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  1. ## Configuration file for a typical Tor user
  2. ## Last updated 22 December 2017 for Tor 0.3.2.8-rc.
  3. ## (may or may not work for much older or much newer versions of Tor.)
  4. ##
  5. ## Lines that begin with "## " try to explain what's going on. Lines
  6. ## that begin with just "#" are disabled commands: you can enable them
  7. ## by removing the "#" symbol.
  8. ##
  9. ## See 'man tor', or https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-manual.html,
  10. ## for more options you can use in this file.
  11. ##
  12. ## Tor will look for this file in various places based on your platform:
  13. ## https://www.torproject.org/docs/faq#torrc
  14.  
  15. ## Tor opens a SOCKS proxy on port 9050 by default -- even if you don't
  16. ## configure one below. Set "SOCKSPort 0" if you plan to run Tor only
  17. ## as a relay, and not make any local application connections yourself.
  18. #SOCKSPort 9050 # Default: Bind to localhost:9050 for local connections.
  19. #SOCKSPort 192.168.0.1:9100 # Bind to this address:port too.
  20.  
  21. ## Entry policies to allow/deny SOCKS requests based on IP address.
  22. ## First entry that matches wins. If no SOCKSPolicy is set, we accept
  23. ## all (and only) requests that reach a SOCKSPort. Untrusted users who
  24. ## can access your SOCKSPort may be able to learn about the connections
  25. ## you make.
  26. #SOCKSPolicy accept 192.168.0.0/16
  27. #SOCKSPolicy accept6 FC00::/7
  28. #SOCKSPolicy reject *
  29.  
  30. ## Logs go to stdout at level "notice" unless redirected by something
  31. ## else, like one of the below lines. You can have as many Log lines as
  32. ## you want.
  33. ##
  34. ## We advise using "notice" in most cases, since anything more verbose
  35. ## may provide sensitive information to an attacker who obtains the logs.
  36. ##
  37. ## Send all messages of level 'notice' or higher to /var/log/tor/notices.log
  38. #Log notice file /var/log/tor/notices.log
  39. ## Send every possible message to /var/log/tor/debug.log
  40. #Log debug file /var/log/tor/debug.log
  41. ## Use the system log instead of Tor's logfiles
  42. #Log notice syslog
  43. ## To send all messages to stderr:
  44. #Log debug stderr
  45.  
  46. ## Uncomment this to start the process in the background... or use
  47. ## --runasdaemon 1 on the command line. This is ignored on Windows;
  48. ## see the FAQ entry if you want Tor to run as an NT service.
  49. #RunAsDaemon 1
  50.  
  51. ## The directory for keeping all the keys/etc. By default, we store
  52. ## things in $HOME/.tor on Unix, and in Application Data\tor on Windows.
  53. #DataDirectory /var/lib/tor
  54.  
  55. ## The port on which Tor will listen for local connections from Tor
  56. ## controller applications, as documented in control-spec.txt.
  57. #ControlPort 9051
  58. ## If you enable the controlport, be sure to enable one of these
  59. ## authentication methods, to prevent attackers from accessing it.
  60. #HashedControlPassword 16:872860B76453A77D60CA2BB8C1A7042072093276A3D701AD684053EC4C
  61. #CookieAuthentication 1
  62.  
  63. ############### This section is just for location-hidden services ###
  64.  
  65. ## Once you have configured a hidden service, you can look at the
  66. ## contents of the file ".../hidden_service/hostname" for the address
  67. ## to tell people.
  68. ##
  69. ## HiddenServicePort x y:z says to redirect requests on port x to the
  70. ## address y:z.
  71.  
  72. #HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/hidden_service/
  73. #HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:80
  74.  
  75. #HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/other_hidden_service/
  76. #HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:80
  77. #HiddenServicePort 22 127.0.0.1:22
  78.  
  79. ################ This section is just for relays #####################
  80. #
  81. ## See https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-doc-relay for details.
  82.  
  83. ## Required: what port to advertise for incoming Tor connections.
  84. #ORPort 9001
  85. ## If you want to listen on a port other than the one advertised in
  86. ## ORPort (e.g. to advertise 443 but bind to 9090), you can do it as
  87. ## follows. You'll need to do ipchains or other port forwarding
  88. ## yourself to make this work.
  89. #ORPort 443 NoListen
  90. #ORPort 127.0.0.1:9090 NoAdvertise
  91.  
  92. ## The IP address or full DNS name for incoming connections to your
  93. ## relay. Leave commented out and Tor will guess.
  94. #Address noname.example.com
  95.  
  96. ## If you have multiple network interfaces, you can specify one for
  97. ## outgoing traffic to use.
  98. ## OutboundBindAddressExit will be used for all exit traffic, while
  99. ## OutboundBindAddressOR will be used for all OR and Dir connections
  100. ## (DNS connections ignore OutboundBindAddress).
  101. ## If you do not wish to differentiate, use OutboundBindAddress to
  102. ## specify the same address for both in a single line.
  103. #OutboundBindAddressExit 10.0.0.4
  104. #OutboundBindAddressOR 10.0.0.5
  105.  
  106. ## A handle for your relay, so people don't have to refer to it by key.
  107. ## Nicknames must be between 1 and 19 characters inclusive, and must
  108. ## contain only the characters [a-zA-Z0-9].
  109. #Nickname ididnteditheconfig
  110.  
  111. ## Define these to limit how much relayed traffic you will allow. Your
  112. ## own traffic is still unthrottled. Note that RelayBandwidthRate must
  113. ## be at least 75 kilobytes per second.
  114. ## Note that units for these config options are bytes (per second), not
  115. ## bits (per second), and that prefixes are binary prefixes, i.e. 2^10,
  116. ## 2^20, etc.
  117. #RelayBandwidthRate 100 KBytes # Throttle traffic to 100KB/s (800Kbps)
  118. #RelayBandwidthBurst 200 KBytes # But allow bursts up to 200KB (1600Kb)
  119.  
  120. ## Use these to restrict the maximum traffic per day, week, or month.
  121. ## Note that this threshold applies separately to sent and received bytes,
  122. ## not to their sum: setting "40 GB" may allow up to 80 GB total before
  123. ## hibernating.
  124. ##
  125. ## Set a maximum of 40 gigabytes each way per period.
  126. #AccountingMax 40 GBytes
  127. ## Each period starts daily at midnight (AccountingMax is per day)
  128. #AccountingStart day 00:00
  129. ## Each period starts on the 3rd of the month at 15:00 (AccountingMax
  130. ## is per month)
  131. #AccountingStart month 3 15:00
  132.  
  133. ## Administrative contact information for this relay or bridge. This line
  134. ## can be used to contact you if your relay or bridge is misconfigured or
  135. ## something else goes wrong. Note that we archive and publish all
  136. ## descriptors containing these lines and that Google indexes them, so
  137. ## spammers might also collect them. You may want to obscure the fact that
  138. ## it's an email address and/or generate a new address for this purpose.
  139. #ContactInfo Random Person <nobody AT example dot com>
  140. ## You might also include your PGP or GPG fingerprint if you have one:
  141. #ContactInfo 0xFFFFFFFF Random Person <nobody AT example dot com>
  142.  
  143. ## Uncomment this to mirror directory information for others. Please do
  144. ## if you have enough bandwidth.
  145. #DirPort 9030 # what port to advertise for directory connections
  146. ## If you want to listen on a port other than the one advertised in
  147. ## DirPort (e.g. to advertise 80 but bind to 9091), you can do it as
  148. ## follows. below too. You'll need to do ipchains or other port
  149. ## forwarding yourself to make this work.
  150. #DirPort 80 NoListen
  151. #DirPort 127.0.0.1:9091 NoAdvertise
  152. ## Uncomment to return an arbitrary blob of html on your DirPort. Now you
  153. ## can explain what Tor is if anybody wonders why your IP address is
  154. ## contacting them. See contrib/tor-exit-notice.html in Tor's source
  155. ## distribution for a sample.
  156. #DirPortFrontPage /etc/tor/tor-exit-notice.html
  157.  
  158. ## Uncomment this if you run more than one Tor relay, and add the identity
  159. ## key fingerprint of each Tor relay you control, even if they're on
  160. ## different networks. You declare it here so Tor clients can avoid
  161. ## using more than one of your relays in a single circuit. See
  162. ## https://www.torproject.org/docs/faq#MultipleRelays
  163. ## However, you should never include a bridge's fingerprint here, as it would
  164. ## break its concealability and potentially reveal its IP/TCP address.
  165. #MyFamily $keyid,$keyid,...
  166.  
  167. ## Uncomment this if you do *not* want your relay to allow any exit traffic.
  168. ## (Relays allow exit traffic by default.)
  169. #ExitRelay 0
  170.  
  171. ## Uncomment this if you want your relay to allow IPv6 exit traffic.
  172. ## (Relays only allow IPv4 exit traffic by default.)
  173. #IPv6Exit 1
  174.  
  175. ## A comma-separated list of exit policies. They're considered first
  176. ## to last, and the first match wins.
  177. ##
  178. ## If you want to allow the same ports on IPv4 and IPv6, write your rules
  179. ## using accept/reject *. If you want to allow different ports on IPv4 and
  180. ## IPv6, write your IPv6 rules using accept6/reject6 *6, and your IPv4 rules
  181. ## using accept/reject *4.
  182. ##
  183. ## If you want to _replace_ the default exit policy, end this with either a
  184. ## reject *:* or an accept *:*. Otherwise, you're _augmenting_ (prepending to)
  185. ## the default exit policy. Leave commented to just use the default, which is
  186. ## described in the man page or at
  187. ## https://www.torproject.org/documentation.html
  188. ##
  189. ## Look at https://www.torproject.org/faq-abuse.html#TypicalAbuses
  190. ## for issues you might encounter if you use the default exit policy.
  191. ##
  192. ## If certain IPs and ports are blocked externally, e.g. by your firewall,
  193. ## you should update your exit policy to reflect this -- otherwise Tor
  194. ## users will be told that those destinations are down.
  195. ##
  196. ## For security, by default Tor rejects connections to private (local)
  197. ## networks, including to the configured primary public IPv4 and IPv6 addresses,
  198. ## and any public IPv4 and IPv6 addresses on any interface on the relay.
  199. ## See the man page entry for ExitPolicyRejectPrivate if you want to allow
  200. ## "exit enclaving".
  201. ##
  202. #ExitPolicy accept *:6660-6667,reject *:* # allow irc ports on IPv4 and IPv6 but no more
  203. #ExitPolicy accept *:119 # accept nntp ports on IPv4 and IPv6 as well as default exit policy
  204. #ExitPolicy accept *4:119 # accept nntp ports on IPv4 only as well as default exit policy
  205. #ExitPolicy accept6 *6:119 # accept nntp ports on IPv6 only as well as default exit policy
  206. #ExitPolicy reject *:* # no exits allowed
  207.  
  208. ## Bridge relays (or "bridges") are Tor relays that aren't listed in the
  209. ## main directory. Since there is no complete public list of them, even an
  210. ## ISP that filters connections to all the known Tor relays probably
  211. ## won't be able to block all the bridges. Also, websites won't treat you
  212. ## differently because they won't know you're running Tor. If you can
  213. ## be a real relay, please do; but if not, be a bridge!
  214. #BridgeRelay 1
  215. ## By default, Tor will advertise your bridge to users through various
  216. ## mechanisms like https://bridges.torproject.org/. If you want to run
  217. ## a private bridge, for example because you'll give out your bridge
  218. ## address manually to your friends, uncomment this line:
  219. #PublishServerDescriptor 0
  220.  
  221. ## Configuration options can be imported from files or folders using the %include
  222. ## option with the value being a path. If the path is a file, the options from the
  223. ## file will be parsed as if they were written where the %include option is. If
  224. ## the path is a folder, all files on that folder will be parsed following lexical
  225. ## order. Files starting with a dot are ignored. Files on subfolders are ignored.
  226. ## The %include option can be used recursively.
  227. #%include /etc/torrc.d/
  228. #%include /etc/torrc.custom
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