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  1. Python is a great choice for DCCM precisely because it is an educational language. This means lots of students who need to build their Github portfolios know Python, and will be able to contribute. Students also have lots of free time and like to play games.
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  3. Python is good for data analysis, and DCCM will need more advanced data analytics than any roguelike to date. Python is also strong in AI, which holds promise for those building AIs to navigate DCCM.
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  5. The so-so performance is fine for a roguelike whose system requirements were set in an ancient era. C++ is traditional for games because the assumption is that a game will push the limits of consumer gaming hardware, but this doesn't apply to roguelikes and DCSS in particular. No graphics upgrade is planned.
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  7. https://www.quora.com/Is-Python-good-for-developing-games-Why-or-why-not/answer/Daniel-Super
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  9. A roguelike such as DCSS is basically only the part of a game that Python could be used to simplify, without any of the high-performance stuff. E.g. a level editor is like actual DCSS levels. Python holds great promise in its ability to organize the tangled mess of classes and interactions that comprise e.g. monsters. This makes balance changes far easier to implement, leading to a more compelling competitive scene, curing elite burnout.
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  11. https://www.quora.com/Is-Python-good-for-developing-games-Why-or-why-not/answer/Avanish-Singh-157
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  13. > Pygame is nice for 2D games
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  15. DCSS is 2D.
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  17. Google has 19.1k hits for pygame roguelikes, including YT tutorial series. Nice.
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  19. here's an excellent resource:
  20. https://ask.metafilter.com/192898/Programming-a-roguelike
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  22. I may be on the wrong track and reinventing the wheel. Old 2011 post, tho.
  23.  
  24. here's the mother lode:
  25. http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/index.php?title=Main_Page
  26.  
  27. http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/index.php?title=Roguelike_Dev_FAQ
  28.  
  29. #+begin_quote
  30. Which programming language are roguelikes generally made in?
  31. Traditionally, C, because of its portability and because other programming languages weren't available at the time. Nowadays, a variety: Java, C++, Pascal, scripting languages etc. The best language for your roguelike is the one you know well.
  32. #+end_quote
  33.  
  34. http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/index.php?title=Articles#Programming_languages
  35.  
  36. http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/index.php?title=Python
  37.  
  38. > Python's rapid speed of development and human-readable code makes it an excellent choice for programmers wanting to develop a Roguelike in a limited amount of time, making the language ideal for 7DRL Challenges
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  40. Perfect. I want to maximize maintainability, to bring back the Stone Soup ethos by maximizing the developer talent pool.
  41.  
  42. looks like there's plenty of prior art.
  43.  
  44. after reviewing the other options, Python still looks like the best bet.
  45.  
  46. http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/index.php?title=C
  47.  
  48. > These days it's much more common for a roguelike to be written in Python or C++, however some 21st century roguelikes are still written in C:
  49.  
  50. http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/index.php?title=Cpp
  51.  
  52. The old way. To infuse fresh blood, go Python.
  53.  
  54. So despite mrg's attempts to mock my quick read that Python is the way to go, it turns out to be correct on closer investigation. Just what's needed to break the SJW sinecure.
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