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  1. ACT III
  2.  
  3. I pray you, good Mercutio,
  4. let's go. The Capulets are out.
  5. You are like the man
  6. who snatches off his sword,
  7. on a tavern's table,
  8. lays it down forthwith
  9. and vows to have
  10. no need of it.
  11. Till, with the second beer,
  12. he takes it up
  13. and runs his host
  14. right through.
  15. Am I like
  16. such a fellow?
  17. You know you are
  18. as hot a Jack today
  19. as any to be found
  20. in Italy.
  21. Your mood as moody
  22. as a bitch on heat.
  23. Is it so?
  24. Why, you'd quarrel with
  25. a man for cracking nuts,
  26. for the insult given
  27. to your hazel eyes.
  28. I've seen you
  29. quarrel with a man
  30. for coughing in the street
  31. because he woke your dog.
  32. And if I did, I'm still less
  33. quick to find a fight than you.
  34. (DISTANT WHISTLING)
  35. By heaven,
  36. here come the Capulets.
  37. And do I care?
  38. Wait over here,
  39. and I will speak with them.
  40. Good morrow, gentlemen.
  41. A word with one of you.
  42. MERCUTIO: A single word
  43. with one of us?
  44. Let's couple it with something.
  45. Maybe a word and a blow?
  46. You'll find me good at that,
  47. Mercutio,
  48. if you'll give me
  49. the chance.
  50. Can you not take the chance,
  51. or must it be given?
  52. I've sent a letter writ
  53. to Romeo, whom you consort with.
  54. Consort with? (LAUGHS)
  55. What? Do you imagine us
  56. a pair of minstrels?
  57. For if you do,
  58. expect the sharpest notes.
  59. Here's my baton that
  60. shall make you dance.
  61. "Consorts," indeed.
  62. Mercutio, Tybalt,
  63. this is a public place.
  64. Either withdraw into
  65. some private place
  66. and there dispute
  67. your grievance,
  68. or else, and better yet,
  69. go home.
  70. Men's eyes were made to look
  71. and let them gaze.
  72. I will not budge
  73. for no man's pleasure, I.
  74. Whoa...
  75. - (GRUNTS)
  76. - Peace be with you, sir.
  77. - Here comes my man.
  78. - MERCUTIO: Your man?
  79. I do not see him
  80. in your livery.
  81. How dare you call
  82. a Montague your man!
  83. Benvolio!
  84. - Is something here amiss?
  85. - TYBALT: Romeo!
  86. The hate I bear thee can afford
  87. no better term than this:
  88. Thou art a villain.
  89. Tybalt, the reason
  90. that I have to love thee
  91. does much excuse
  92. the appertaining rage
  93. to such a greeting.
  94. Villain am I none.
  95. Therefore, farewell.
  96. I see you know me not.
  97. Boy! This will not temper
  98. the injuries you have done me.
  99. Therefore, turn and fight.
  100. I do insist I never
  101. injured you, but loved you
  102. better than you'll understand,
  103. till you do know the reason.
  104. So, good Capulet,
  105. a name I love as dearly
  106. as my own, be satisfied.
  107. A smooth, dishonorable,
  108. vile submission!
  109. Tybalt. (SPITS)
  110. You rat catcher.
  111. Will you walk this way?
  112. What do you want from me?
  113. Good king of cats,
  114. just one of your nine lives.
  115. You have it to spare,
  116. with eight to use hereafter.
  117. What, do you dither now
  118. to draw your sword?
  119. Make haste or I will
  120. pluck you ere it's out.
  121. - I am for you.
  122. - No, Mercutio, I beg you,
  123. - put your sword down.
  124. - MERCUTIO: Come, sir.
  125. Are you ready?
  126. Let's begin.
  127. ROMEO: Mercutio, stop! Benvolio,
  128. help me hold them back!
  129. We must stop! Please!
  130. Mercutio! Tybalt!
  131. (GRUNTING)
  132. Gentlemen, for shame!
  133. Stop this brawl now!
  134. You know the prince
  135. has made his wishes clear:
  136. an end to fighting
  137. in Verona's streets!
  138. Tybalt, good Mercutio, hold!
  139. It is time for peace!
  140. (GROANS)
  141. Let's away.
  142. I am dead.
  143. Is Tybalt gone
  144. with no wound to bear?
  145. ROMEO: You, sir, run to my
  146. father's house! Fetch a surgeon!
  147. Tybalt!
  148. Romeo!
  149. Villain! Dog!
  150. If thou art brave,
  151. come settle with me, boy.
  152. Have courage, man.
  153. The wound cannot be much.
  154. No.
  155. 'Tis not so deep as a well,
  156. nor so wide as a church door,
  157. but 'tis enough.
  158. 'Twill serve.
  159. Ask for me tomorrow, and you
  160. shall find me a grave man.
  161. I am peppered, I warrant,
  162. for this world.
  163. Why the devil came you
  164. between us?
  165. He stabbed me
  166. under your arm.
  167. I thought all for the best.
  168. Our best intentions
  169. pave the way to hell.
  170. To hell with
  171. the Montagues and Capulets...
  172. ...whose angry war
  173. has stolen all my days.
  174. Plague on both your houses.
  175. (MERCUTIO GASPING)
  176. He's dead.
  177. His gallant spirit
  178. is among the clouds.
  179. Stay here, Benvolio.
  180. Be what help you may.
  181. I have some business
  182. with a new relation.
  183. No! But, Romeo, stay!
  184. ROMEO: Tybalt!
  185. Let him pass.
  186. What, Romeo? Is it cowardice
  187. that holds you back?
  188. (GASPS)
  189. (GROANS)
  190. Many have died
  191. in this place, Montague.
  192. Befriend their spirits
  193. while you still have time.
  194. They wait to welcome you
  195. with open arms.
  196. They wait for one of us.
  197. That much is sure.
  198. (GRUNTS)
  199. (GRUNTING)
  200. Cousin!
  201. - We're here, Tybalt.
  202. - We're here for you, sir.
  203. Leave us!
  204. (GRUNTING)
  205. - (TYBALT GROANS)
  206. - No!
  207. MAN: My Lord! My Lord?
  208. (GASPING)
  209. (WHEEZING EXHALE)
  210. BENVOLIO: Romeo, away!
  211. The gods themselves are angry.
  212. Tybalt's killed!
  213. - MAN: Tybalt is slain!
  214. - Don't stand there dazed. Go!
  215. The prince will have your head
  216. if you are taken. Go!
  217. Oh, I am fortune's fool.
  218. MAN: Romeo, begone.
  219. Away you now!
  220. (CROWD CLAMORING)
  221. (CLAMORING CONTINUES)
  222. LADY CAPULET:
  223. Tybalt, my nephew.
  224. He was my brother's child.
  225. See how the blood is spilled
  226. of my dear kinsmen.
  227. Prince, as you are true,
  228. for blood of ours,
  229. shed blood of Montague.
  230. Benvolio, who began
  231. this bloody fight?
  232. Tybalt, here slain,
  233. and I was witness how.
  234. Romeo did beg him to desist.
  235. Alas, nothing could stay
  236. the rage of angry Tybalt,
  237. whose ears were deaf to peace.
  238. But what of the second act?
  239. Mercutio lies dead,
  240. and in his grief does
  241. blinded Romeo entertain revenge.
  242. He is a cousin
  243. of the Montagues.
  244. Affection makes him false.
  245. Romeo killed Tybalt.
  246. Romeo must not live.
  247. Romeo killed him.
  248. He killed Mercutio.
  249. Who is the guilty man
  250. in all this grief?
  251. MONTAGUE: Not Romeo, Prince.
  252. He was Mercutio's friend,
  253. and killed his murderer.
  254. The very end the law
  255. would have exacted.
  256. (SIGHS)
  257. This offense means we do now,
  258. at once, exile him hence.
  259. I will be deaf to
  260. pleading and excuse.
  261. Therefore, use none.
  262. Let Romeo leave in haste.
  263. For if he's found,
  264. that hour will be his last.
  265. (CRYING)
  266. Did Romeo's hand
  267. shed Tybalt's blood?
  268. It did.
  269. I weep to say it,
  270. but it did.
  271. And now the prince
  272. has exiled Tybalt's murderer.
  273. - No.
  274. - Shame on your Romeo.
  275. Blister your tongue!
  276. Oh, what a beast I've
  277. been to chide him.
  278. Did Tybalt not first
  279. stab Mercutio?
  280. Will you speak well of him
  281. that killed your cousin?
  282. Shall I speak ill of him
  283. that is my husband?
  284. How stupid I have been to rail,
  285. when now your news of him
  286. is worse than Tybalt's death.
  287. Worse than your cousin's death?
  288. Indeed. You told me
  289. Romeo is banished.
  290. And that one word is greater
  291. grief to me than Father, Mother,
  292. Tybalt and myself
  293. all dead and buried.
  294. Stay in your room,
  295. and I'll find Romeo.
  296. I promise you
  297. a husband for tonight.
  298. Give this ring
  299. to my true knight
  300. and bid him come
  301. to take his last farewell.
  302. I will.
  303. (SOBBING)
  304. What have I done
  305. but murdered my tomorrow?
  306. In killing him
  307. whom she most truly loved,
  308. I have tried and sentenced
  309. my own heart to death.
  310. But if she can pity me
  311. my suffering,
  312. then were it worth
  313. a thousand torments more.
  314. Disasters follow you
  315. like trusty dogs.
  316. You must be married to calamity.
  317. Tell me the prince's verdict.
  318. Am I to die so young?
  319. Not yet at least.
  320. His judgment has more pity
  321. than you dread.
  322. He seeks to have you
  323. banished and not dead.
  324. Not banishment.
  325. Be merciful, say "death,"
  326. for exile has more terror in its
  327. look, much more than death.
  328. Do not say "banishment."
  329. All he asks is that
  330. you leave Verona.
  331. It's not so much.
  332. The world is broad and wide.
  333. There is no world
  334. beyond the city's walls.
  335. Just purgatory, torture,
  336. hell itself.
  337. And exile is
  338. another word for "death."
  339. The prince's kindness
  340. is a golden axe
  341. that cuts my head off.
  342. Rude, unthankful boy.
  343. The prince, in gentleness,
  344. overturns the law!
  345. This is sweet mercy,
  346. and you see it not!
  347. 'Tis torture and not mercy.
  348. Heaven is here,
  349. where Juliet lives,
  350. and every cat and dog
  351. and little mouse,
  352. every unworthy thing,
  353. live here in heaven and may look
  354. on her, but Romeo may not.
  355. More validity,
  356. more honorable state,
  357. more courtship lives
  358. in carrion flies than Romeo.
  359. And they may seize on the white
  360. wonder of dear Juliet's hand.
  361. I mean, flies may do this,
  362. but I from this must fly.
  363. They are free men,
  364. but I am banished.
  365. Cease, Romeo,
  366. in your ingratitude.
  367. You cannot talk
  368. of what you do not feel.
  369. If you were young like me
  370. and full of love,
  371. married an hour,
  372. red with Tybalt's blood,
  373. hungry for Juliet
  374. but banished from her side,
  375. then you could speak
  376. and I would listen.
  377. NURSE: Where is my lady's lord?
  378. Where is Romeo?
  379. Behold him now,
  380. with his own tears made drunk.
  381. So is my lady Juliet
  382. just the same,
  383. blubbering and weeping,
  384. weeping and blubbering.
  385. Good nurse, you speak
  386. of Juliet?
  387. Say quick: Does she now
  388. think I am a murderer?
  389. She weeps and weeps.
  390. And lies upon her bed, and...
  391. and then jumps up and cries out,
  392. "Tybalt," and then, "Romeo."
  393. My name was fatal to her
  394. from the start.
  395. It kills her, as it killed
  396. her noble kinsman.
  397. Oh, tell me in what part of
  398. my anatomy does lodge my name,
  399. - and I will hack it off!
  400. - What?
  401. Wouldst kill yourself
  402. and all the lady's hopes?
  403. Look to your wits!
  404. Your Juliet is alive.
  405. There you are happy.
  406. Tybalt would kill you,
  407. but you instead killed Tybalt.
  408. Take heart.
  409. The prince has altered death
  410. to simple exile.
  411. Another stroke of luck
  412. to make you smile.
  413. Have done with pouting.
  414. Go to your love.
  415. Climb to her chamber,
  416. kiss and comfort her!
  417. But leave before the watch
  418. begins to walk,
  419. to make the journey
  420. safe to Mantua,
  421. where you will live
  422. till we can find a way
  423. to blaze your marriage,
  424. reconcile your friends,
  425. beg pardon of the prince
  426. and call you back.
  427. Oh, what it is
  428. to hear good counsel.
  429. You must return
  430. to my lady Juliet.
  431. Say Romeo is coming.
  432. My Lord, I'll tell
  433. my lady you will come.
  434. Say I am prepared
  435. to be chastised.
  436. Here, sir, a ring
  437. she did bid me give you.
  438. How well my comfort
  439. is revived by this.
  440. FRIAR LAURENCE: Be sure
  441. you leave before the dawn.
  442. Then make your home
  443. in Mantua and wait.
  444. I will send you messages
  445. with all our news.
  446. ROMEO: If I were not to gain
  447. a joy past joy,
  448. I would be sad to leave you.
  449. So farewell.
  450. LADY CAPULET: Why the race
  451. to drag her to the church?
  452. Give her time
  453. to mourn her cousin.
  454. No. We have no time
  455. to waste in sterile tears,
  456. with Paris restive in the slips
  457. and soon to be rid of her
  458. if he be not persuaded
  459. she is his.
  460. I do not think
  461. he is so changeable.
  462. Let us not take a chance
  463. with lovers' vows
  464. when Jove does laugh
  465. at their fragility.
  466. Do you want legal offspring
  467. from our loins?
  468. With Tybalt dead
  469. and all our line at risk,
  470. young Juliet
  471. is the only living course
  472. through which our blood
  473. can flow.
  474. You know I do.
  475. Well, then we shall
  476. take action when we may
  477. and strike while
  478. the iron is hot.
  479. MAN: This way, sir.
  480. Paris, welcome.
  481. How does my lady
  482. in this sorrowful hour?
  483. I would that I might be
  484. some comfort to her.
  485. Tonight, she is imprisoned
  486. in her grief,
  487. but in the morning,
  488. I will know her mind.
  489. Wife... when dawn breaks,
  490. bid her make ready
  491. for her wedding day.
  492. You will tell her on Thursday
  493. she will wed the noble count.
  494. What say you to Thursday?
  495. My Lord, I wish Thursday
  496. were tomorrow.
  497. Thursday it is, then.
  498. JULIET: Come, gentle night.
  499. Come loving,
  500. black-browed night.
  501. Give me my Romeo,
  502. and when he shall die,
  503. take him and cut him out
  504. in little stars.
  505. He will make the face
  506. of Heaven so fine
  507. that all the world will be
  508. in love with night
  509. and pay no worship
  510. to the garish sun.
  511. (SIGHS)
  512. My husband.
  513. My wife.
  514. (BIRDS CHIRPING)
  515. (BIRDS CONTINUE CHIRPING)
  516. Must you be gone?
  517. It's nowhere near the dawn.
  518. You heard the nightingale
  519. and not a lark, I promise.
  520. She sings each night
  521. sitting in yonder tree.
  522. Believe me, love,
  523. it was the nightingale.
  524. It was the lark,
  525. the herald of the morn.
  526. No nightingale.
  527. Look, love,
  528. what envious streaks do lace
  529. the severing clouds
  530. in yonder east.
  531. Night's candles are burnt out,
  532. and jocund day stands tiptoe
  533. on the misty mountain tops.
  534. I must be gone and live,
  535. or stay and die.
  536. I do not think the light
  537. is daylight yet.
  538. I am content
  539. if you would have it so.
  540. I have more heart to stay
  541. than will to go.
  542. Come, death, and welcome.
  543. Juliet wills it so.
  544. I will lie with you
  545. and say it is not day.
  546. (BIRDS CHIRPING)
  547. It is. It is. Go now.
  548. Begone. Away!
  549. Oh, it is the lark
  550. that sings so out of tune
  551. with horrid discords
  552. and unpleasant sharps.
  553. Oh, hurry now.
  554. More light and light it grows!
  555. More light and light,
  556. more dark and dark our woes.
  557. (RUNNING FOOTSTEPS)
  558. - Madam!
  559. - What is it?
  560. Your mother is soon coming
  561. to your chamber.
  562. The day is here.
  563. Be careful and make haste.
  564. I shall be gone.
  565. Your parents cannot know
  566. that I have been part
  567. of this deceit.
  568. Farewell, my love.
  569. One more kiss,
  570. and I'll descend.
  571. No. Come this way.
  572. I'll teach Benvolio to learn
  573. your news each day.
  574. No, more than that.
  575. Each hour in each day.
  576. Each minute in each hour
  577. is a day for pining lovers.
  578. And amen to that.
  579. Do you believe
  580. we'll ever meet again?
  581. I do not doubt it.
  582. Nor that we shall smile
  583. to think
  584. of all these troubles
  585. in the past.
  586. If God would only
  587. free me of foreboding.
  588. I think I see you,
  589. now you are below,
  590. as dim and pale
  591. as dead men in their tombs.
  592. So are you dim, love,
  593. in dawn's drab light.
  594. Our worries make us pale.
  595. So adieu.
  596. Oh, fortune, fortune,
  597. all men call you fickle because
  598. no fortune ever constant be.
  599. If that is so,
  600. then change again, oh, fortune.
  601. Be fickle now
  602. and send him back to me.
  603.  
  604. Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/movie_script.php?movie=romeo-and-juliet
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