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OpenAI Whisper Test 2

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  1. [00:00.000 --> 00:19.020] A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle Part 1 Being a reprint from the reminiscences
  2. [00:19.020 --> 00:25.440] of John H. Watson, M.D., late of the Army Medical Department
  3. [00:25.440 --> 00:34.560] Number 1 Mr. Sherlock Holmes In the year 1878, I took my degree of Doctor
  4. [00:34.560 --> 00:39.160] of Medicine of the University of London, and proceeded to Neckley to go through the course
  5. [00:39.160 --> 00:42.680] prescribed for surgeons in the Army.
  6. [00:42.680 --> 00:47.560] Having completed my studies there, I was duly attached to the 5th Northumber and Fusiliers
  7. [00:47.560 --> 00:49.760] as assistant surgeon.
  8. [00:49.760 --> 00:54.240] The regiment was stationed in India at the time, and before I could join it, the Second
  9. [00:54.240 --> 00:56.920] Afghan War had broken out.
  10. [00:56.920 --> 01:01.920] On landing at Bombay, I learned that my corps had advanced through the passes, and was already
  11. [01:01.920 --> 01:04.120] deep in the enemy's country.
  12. [01:04.120 --> 01:09.240] I followed, however, with many other officers who were in the same situation as myself,
  13. [01:09.240 --> 01:14.880] and succeeded in reaching Kandahar in safety, where I found my regiment, and at once entered
  14. [01:14.880 --> 01:17.920] upon my new duties.
  15. [01:17.920 --> 01:23.640] The campaign brought honours and promotion to many, but for me it had nothing but misfortune
  16. [01:23.640 --> 01:25.480] and disaster.
  17. [01:25.480 --> 01:29.920] I was removed from my brigade and attached to the barches with whom I served at the fatal
  18. [01:29.920 --> 01:31.680] battle of my wand.
  19. [01:31.680 --> 01:37.280] There, I was struck on the shoulder by a gesile bullet, which shattered the bone and grazed
  20. [01:37.280 --> 01:39.400] the subclavian artery.
  21. [01:39.400 --> 01:43.380] I should have fallen into the hands of the murderous ghazis had it not been for the devotion
  22. [01:43.380 --> 01:49.080] and courage shown by Murray, my orderly, who threw me across a pack horse, and succeeded
  23. [01:49.080 --> 01:53.400] in bringing me safely to the British lines.
  24. [01:53.400 --> 01:58.640] Starting with pain, and weak from the prolonged hardships which I had undergone, I was removed
  25. [01:58.640 --> 02:04.240] with a great train of wounded sufferers to the base hospital at Peshawar.
  26. [02:04.240 --> 02:09.040] Here I rallied, and had already improved so far as to be able to walk about the wards,
  27. [02:09.040 --> 02:15.680] and even to bask a little upon the veranda, when I was struck down by enteric fever, that
  28. [02:15.680 --> 02:17.800] curse of our Indian possessions.
  29. [02:17.800 --> 02:24.360] For months my life was despaired of, and when at last I came to myself and became convalescent,
  30. [02:24.360 --> 02:29.360] I was so weak and emaciated that a medical board determined that not a day should be
  31. [02:29.360 --> 02:32.120] lost in sending me back to England.
  32. [02:32.120 --> 02:37.240] I was dispatched accordingly in the troopship Orantes, and landed a month later on Portsmouth
  33. [02:37.240 --> 02:43.360] jetty, with my health irretrievably ruined, but with permission from a paternal government
  34. [02:43.360 --> 02:48.440] to spend the next nine months in attempting to improve it.
  35. [02:48.440 --> 02:54.160] I had neither kith nor kin in England, and was therefore as free as air, or as free as
  36. [02:54.160 --> 02:58.840] an income of eleven shillings and sixpence a day will permit a man to be.
  37. [02:58.840 --> 03:04.160] Under such circumstances I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which
  38. [03:04.160 --> 03:09.680] all the loungers and idlers of the empire are irresistibly drained.
  39. [03:09.680 --> 03:15.160] There I stayed for some time at a private hotel in the Strand, leaving a comfortless,
  40. [03:15.160 --> 03:20.120] meaningless existence, and spending such money as I had considerably more freely than I
  41. [03:20.120 --> 03:21.880] ought.
  42. [03:21.880 --> 03:26.920] So alarming did the state of my finances become, that I soon realized that I must either leave
  43. [03:26.920 --> 03:31.720] the metropolis and rusticate somewhere in the country, or that I must make a complete
  44. [03:31.720 --> 03:34.720] alteration in my style of living.
  45. [03:34.720 --> 03:39.400] Choosing the latter alternative, I began by making up my mind to leave the hotel, and
  46. [03:39.400 --> 03:45.460] to take up my quarters in some less pretentious and less expensive domicile.
  47. [03:45.460 --> 03:50.960] On the very day that I had come to this conclusion, I was standing at the criterion bar when someone
  48. [03:50.960 --> 03:56.040] tapped me on the shoulder, and turning round, I recognized young Stanford, who had been
  49. [03:56.040 --> 03:58.400] a dresser under me at Bart's.
  50. [03:58.400 --> 04:03.000] The sight of a friendly face in the great wilderness of London is a pleasant thing indeed
  51. [04:03.000 --> 04:05.080] to a lonely man.
  52. [04:05.080 --> 04:10.800] In old days, Stanford had never been a particular crony of mine, but now I hailed him with enthusiasm,
  53. [04:10.800 --> 04:14.840] and he, in his turn, appeared to be delighted to see me.
  54. [04:14.840 --> 04:19.880] In the exuberance of my joy, I asked him to lunch with me at the Holborn, and we started
  55. [04:19.880 --> 04:21.680] off together in a handsome.
  56. [04:21.680 --> 04:27.680] What have you been doing with yourself, Watson? he asked in undisguised wonder as we rattled
  57. [04:27.680 --> 04:29.240] through the crowded London streets.
  58. [04:29.240 --> 04:33.160] You are as thin as a laugh and brown as a nut.
  59. [04:33.160 --> 04:37.640] I gave him a short sketch of my adventures, and had hardly concluded it by the time that
  60. [04:37.640 --> 04:39.240] we reached our destination.
  61. [04:39.240 --> 04:43.640] Poor devil! he said, commiseratingly, after he had listened to my misfortunes.
  62. [04:43.640 --> 04:46.080] What are you up to now?
  63. [04:46.080 --> 04:51.000] Looking for lodgings, I answered, trying to solve the problem as to whether it is possible
  64. [04:51.000 --> 04:53.360] to get comfortable rooms at a reasonable price.
  65. [04:53.360 --> 04:56.400] That is a strange thing, remarked my companion.
  66. [04:56.400 --> 05:00.360] You are the second man today that has used that expression to me.
  67. [05:00.360 --> 05:01.360] And who was the first?
  68. [05:01.360 --> 05:02.360] I asked.
  69. [05:02.360 --> 05:05.600] A fellow who is working at the chemical laboratory up at the hospital.
  70. [05:05.600 --> 05:09.320] He was bemoaning himself this morning, because he could not get someone to go hard with him
  71. [05:09.320 --> 05:13.920] in some nice rooms which he had found, and which were too much for his purse.
  72. [05:13.920 --> 05:16.320] By Jove, I cried.
  73. [05:16.320 --> 05:20.400] If he really wants someone to share the rooms and the expense, I am the very man for him.
  74. [05:20.400 --> 05:23.800] I should prefer having a partner to being alone.
  75. [05:23.800 --> 05:27.240] Young Stanford looked rather strangely at me over his wine glass.
  76. [05:27.240 --> 05:31.800] You don't know Sherlock Holmes yet, he said.
  77. [05:31.800 --> 05:34.600] She would not care for him as a constant companion.
  78. [05:34.600 --> 05:35.600] Why?
  79. [05:35.600 --> 05:36.600] What is there against him?
  80. [05:36.600 --> 05:38.680] Look, I didn't say there was anything against him.
  81. [05:38.680 --> 05:43.760] He is a little queer in his ideas, an enthusiast in some branches of science.
  82. [05:43.760 --> 05:46.640] As far as I know, he is a decent fellow enough.
  83. [05:46.640 --> 05:49.520] A medical student, I suppose, said I?
  84. [05:49.520 --> 05:50.520] No.
  85. [05:50.520 --> 05:52.880] I have no idea what he intends to go in for.
  86. [05:52.880 --> 05:56.920] I believe he is well up in anatomy, and he is a first class chemist.
  87. [05:56.920 --> 06:02.080] But as far as I know, he has never taken out any systematic medical classes.
  88. [06:02.080 --> 06:06.520] His studies are very desultory and eccentric, but he has amassed a lot of out of the way
  89. [06:06.520 --> 06:09.520] knowledge which would astonish his professors.
  90. [06:09.520 --> 06:11.640] Did you never ask him what he was going in for?
  91. [06:11.640 --> 06:12.640] I asked.
  92. [06:12.640 --> 06:13.640] No.
  93. [06:13.640 --> 06:17.960] He is not a man that is easy to draw out, though he can be communicative enough when
  94. [06:17.960 --> 06:19.120] the fancy seizes him.
  95. [06:19.120 --> 06:21.600] I should like to meet him, I said.
  96. [06:21.600 --> 06:25.920] If I am to lodge with anyone, I should prefer a man of studious and quiet habits.
  97. [06:25.920 --> 06:29.360] I am not strong enough yet to stand much noise or excitement.
  98. [06:29.360 --> 06:34.880] I had enough of both in Afghanistan to last me for the remainder of my natural existence.
  99. [06:34.880 --> 06:36.440] How could I meet this friend of yours?
  100. [06:36.440 --> 06:39.800] He is sure to be at the laboratory, returned my companion.
  101. [06:39.800 --> 06:43.880] He either avoids the place for weeks, or else he works there from morning till night.
  102. [06:43.880 --> 06:46.960] If you like, we will drive round together after luncheon.
  103. [06:46.960 --> 06:52.920] Certainly, I answered, and the conversation drifted away into other channels.
  104. [06:52.920 --> 06:57.920] As we made our way to the hospital after leaving the Holborn, Stanford gave me a few more particulars
  105. [06:57.920 --> 07:01.280] about the gentleman whom I propose to take as a fellow lodger.
  106. [07:01.280 --> 07:04.640] You mustn't blame me if you don't get on with him, he said.
  107. [07:04.640 --> 07:09.160] I know nothing more of him than I have learned from meeting him occasionally in the laboratory.
  108. [07:09.160 --> 07:13.520] You propose this arrangement, so you must not hold me responsible.
  109. [07:13.520 --> 07:17.520] If we don't get on, it will be easy to part company, I answered.
  110. [07:17.520 --> 07:21.880] It seems to me, Stanford, I added, looking hard at my companion, that you have some reason
  111. [07:21.880 --> 07:23.840] for washing your hands of the matter.
  112. [07:23.840 --> 07:27.840] Is this fellow's temper so formidable, or what is it?
  113. [07:27.840 --> 07:29.400] Don't be mealy mouthed about it.
  114. [07:29.400 --> 07:34.840] It is not easy to express the inexpressible, he answered with a laugh.
  115. [07:34.840 --> 07:38.360] Holmes is a little too scientific for my tastes.
  116. [07:38.360 --> 07:40.320] It approaches to cold bloodedness.
  117. [07:40.320 --> 07:44.600] I could imagine his giving a friend a little pinch of the latest vegetable alkaloid, not
  118. [07:44.600 --> 07:49.120] out of malevolence, you understand, but simply out of the spirit of inquiry, in order to
  119. [07:49.120 --> 07:51.600] have an accurate idea of the effects.
  120. [07:51.600 --> 07:55.560] To do him justice, I think that he would pig it himself with the same readiness.
  121. [07:55.560 --> 07:59.960] He appears to have a passion for definite and exact knowledge.
  122. [07:59.960 --> 08:00.960] Very right, too.
  123. [08:00.960 --> 08:04.400] Yes, but it may be pushed to excess.
  124. [08:04.400 --> 08:08.480] When it comes to beating the subjects in the dissecting rooms with a stick, it is certainly
  125. [08:08.480 --> 08:11.200] taking rather a bizarre shape.
  126. [08:11.200 --> 08:12.480] Beating the subjects?
  127. [08:12.480 --> 08:17.240] Yes, to verify how far bruises may be produced after death.
  128. [08:17.240 --> 08:19.680] I saw him at it with my own eyes.
  129. [08:19.680 --> 08:22.400] And yet you say he is not a medical student?
  130. [08:22.400 --> 08:23.400] No.
  131. [08:23.400 --> 08:25.840] Heaven knows what the objects of his studies are.
  132. [08:25.840 --> 08:30.200] But here we are, and you must form your own impressions about him.
  133. [08:30.200 --> 08:34.880] As he spoke, we turned down a narrow lane and passed to a small side door which opened
  134. [08:34.880 --> 08:37.120] into a wing of the great hospital.
  135. [08:37.120 --> 08:41.760] It was familiar ground to me, and I needed no guiding as we ascended the bleak stone
  136. [08:41.760 --> 08:47.120] staircase and made our way down the long corridor with its vista of whitewashed wall and dunn
  137. [08:47.120 --> 08:49.200] coloured doors.
  138. [08:49.200 --> 08:54.760] Here the farther end a low arched passage branched away from it and led to the chemical
  139. [08:54.760 --> 08:56.360] laboratory.
  140. [08:56.360 --> 09:01.920] This was a lofty chamber, lined and littered with countless bottles.
  141. [09:01.920 --> 09:06.560] Broad low tables were scattered about which bristled with retorts, test tubes, and little
  142. [09:06.560 --> 09:09.920] Bunsen lamps with their blue flickering flames.
  143. [09:09.920 --> 09:14.520] There was only one student in the room who was bending over a distant table absorbed
  144. [09:14.520 --> 09:15.520] in his work.
  145. [09:15.520 --> 09:20.560] At the sound of our steps he glanced round and sprang to his feet with a cry of pleasure.
  146. [09:20.560 --> 09:22.160] I found it!
  147. [09:22.160 --> 09:23.440] I found it!
  148. [09:23.440 --> 09:27.400] he shouted to my companion, running towards us with a test tube in his hand.
  149. [09:27.400 --> 09:33.000] I have found a reagent which is precipitated by hemoglobin and by nothing else!
  150. [09:33.000 --> 09:37.120] Had he discovered a gold mine, greater delight could not have shone upon his features.
  151. [09:37.120 --> 09:39.120] Dr. Watson?
  152. [09:39.120 --> 09:42.480] Mr. Sherlock Holmes, said Stanford, introducing us.
  153. [09:42.480 --> 09:43.480] How are you?
  154. [09:43.480 --> 09:47.120] He said cordially, gripping my hand with a strength for which I should hardly have given
  155. [09:47.120 --> 09:48.120] him credit.
  156. [09:48.120 --> 09:50.920] You have been in Afghanistan, I perceive.
  157. [09:50.920 --> 09:53.920] How on earth did you know that, I ask in astonishment.
  158. [09:53.920 --> 09:56.760] Never mind! said he, chuckling to himself.
  159. [09:56.760 --> 09:59.320] The question now is about hemoglobin.
  160. [09:59.320 --> 10:02.320] No doubt you see the significance of this discovery of mine.
  161. [10:02.320 --> 10:05.960] It is interesting chemically, no doubt, I answered.
  162. [10:05.960 --> 10:06.960] But practically?
  163. [10:06.960 --> 10:07.960] Why, man?
  164. [10:07.960 --> 10:11.640] It is the most practical, medical legal discovery for years.
  165. [10:11.640 --> 10:15.680] Don't you see that it gives us an infallible test for bloodstains?
  166. [10:15.680 --> 10:17.480] Come over here now.
  167. [10:17.480 --> 10:22.120] He seized me by the coat sleeve in his eagerness and drew me over to the table at which he
  168. [10:22.120 --> 10:23.120] had been working.
  169. [10:23.120 --> 10:28.560] Let us have some fresh blood, he said, digging a long bodkin into his finger and drawing
  170. [10:28.560 --> 10:31.800] off the resulting drop of blood into a chemical pipette.
  171. [10:31.800 --> 10:35.680] Now I add this small quantity of blood to a litre of water.
  172. [10:35.680 --> 10:40.080] You perceive that the resulting mixture has the appearance of pure water?
  173. [10:40.080 --> 10:43.240] The proportion of blood cannot be more than one in a million.
  174. [10:43.240 --> 10:47.840] I have no doubt, however, that we shall be able to obtain the characteristic reaction.
  175. [10:47.840 --> 10:53.520] As he spoke, he threw into the vessel a few white crystals and then added some drops of
  176. [10:53.520 --> 10:55.360] a transparent fluid.
  177. [10:55.360 --> 11:01.160] In an instant the contents assumed a dull mahogany colour and a brownish dust was precipitated
  178. [11:01.160 --> 11:03.080] to the bottom of the glass jar.
  179. [11:03.080 --> 11:08.520] Ha ha! he cried, clapping his hands and looking as delighted as a child with a new toy.
  180. [11:08.520 --> 11:10.280] What do you think of that?
  181. [11:10.280 --> 11:14.520] It seems to be a very delicate test, I remarked.
  182. [11:14.520 --> 11:15.520] Beautiful!
  183. [11:15.520 --> 11:16.520] Beautiful!
  184. [11:16.520 --> 11:19.800] The old guacam test was very clumsy and uncertain.
  185. [11:19.800 --> 11:22.800] So is the microscopic examination for blood corpuscles.
  186. [11:22.800 --> 11:25.800] The latter is valueless if the stains are a few hours old.
  187. [11:25.800 --> 11:30.360] Now this appears to act as well whether the blood is old or new.
  188. [11:30.360 --> 11:34.760] Had this test been invented, there are hundreds of men now walking the earth who would long
  189. [11:34.760 --> 11:37.120] ago have paid the penalty of their crimes.
  190. [11:37.120 --> 11:39.360] Indeed, I murmured.
  191. [11:39.360 --> 11:42.560] Criminal cases are continually hinging upon that one point.
  192. [11:42.560 --> 11:48.200] A man is suspected of a crime, months perhaps, after it has been committed.
  193. [11:48.200 --> 11:51.960] His linen or clothes are examined and brownish stains discovered upon them.
  194. [11:51.960 --> 11:58.120] Are they blood stains or mud stains or rust stains or fruit stains or what are they?
  195. [11:58.120 --> 12:00.840] That is a question which has puzzled many an expert.
  196. [12:00.840 --> 12:02.400] And why?
  197. [12:02.400 --> 12:05.280] Because there was no reliable test.
  198. [12:05.280 --> 12:11.440] Now we have the Sherlock Holmes test, and there will no longer be any difficulty.
  199. [12:11.440 --> 12:16.080] His eyes fairly glittered as he spoke, and he put his hand over his heart and bowed
  200. [12:16.080 --> 12:21.320] as if to some applauding crowd conjured up by his imagination.
  201. [12:21.320 --> 12:27.200] You are to be congratulated, I remarked, considerably surprised at his enthusiasm.
  202. [12:27.200 --> 12:30.540] There was the case of von Bischoff at Frankfurt last year.
  203. [12:30.540 --> 12:34.760] He would certainly have been hung had this test been in existence.
  204. [12:34.760 --> 12:40.640] Then there was Mason at Bradford and the notorious Muller, and Lefebvre of Montpellier, and Samson
  205. [12:40.640 --> 12:41.640] of New Orleans.
  206. [12:41.640 --> 12:44.920] I could name a score of cases in which it would have been decisive.
  207. [12:44.920 --> 12:49.920] You seem to be a walking calendar of crime, said Stanford with a laugh.
  208. [12:49.920 --> 12:52.480] You might start a paper on those lines.
  209. [12:52.480 --> 12:55.480] Call it the police news of the past.
  210. [12:55.480 --> 13:00.080] Very interesting reading it might be made, too, remarked Sherlock Holmes, sticking a
  211. [13:00.080 --> 13:02.680] small piece of plaster over the prick on his finger.
  212. [13:02.680 --> 13:07.320] I have to be careful, he continued, turning to me with a smile, for I double with poisons
  213. [13:07.320 --> 13:08.680] a good deal.
  214. [13:08.680 --> 13:13.000] He held out his hand as he spoke, and I noticed that it was mottled over with similar pieces
  215. [13:13.000 --> 13:16.480] of plaster, and discoloured with strong acids.
  216. [13:16.480 --> 13:23.120] We came here on business, said Stanford, sitting down on a high three legged stool, and pushing
  217. [13:23.120 --> 13:25.960] another one in my direction with his foot.
  218. [13:25.960 --> 13:30.440] My friend here wants to take diggings, and as you were complaining that you could get
  219. [13:30.440 --> 13:34.840] no one to go house with you, I thought that I had better bring you together.
  220. [13:34.840 --> 13:39.320] Sherlock Holmes seemed delighted at the idea of sharing his rooms with me.
  221. [13:39.320 --> 13:45.000] I have my eye on a suite in Baker Street, he said, which would suit us down to the ground.
  222. [13:45.000 --> 13:47.640] We don't mind the smell of strong tobacco, I hope.
  223. [13:47.640 --> 13:50.840] I always smoke ships myself, I answered.
  224. [13:50.840 --> 13:51.840] That's good enough.
  225. [13:51.840 --> 13:55.640] I generally have chemicals about, and occasionally do experiments.
  226. [13:55.640 --> 13:57.200] Would that annoy you?
  227. [13:57.200 --> 13:58.200] By no means.
  228. [13:58.200 --> 14:02.200] Let me see, what are my other short comings?
  229. [14:02.200 --> 14:05.720] I get in the dumps at times, and don't open my mouth for days on end.
  230. [14:05.720 --> 14:11.080] You must not think I am sulky when I do that, just let me alone, and I'll soon be right.
  231. [14:11.080 --> 14:12.080] What have you to confess now?
  232. [14:12.080 --> 14:15.240] It's just as well for two fellows to know the worst of one another before they begin
  233. [14:15.240 --> 14:16.800] to live together.
  234. [14:16.800 --> 14:19.040] I laughed at this cross examination.
  235. [14:19.040 --> 14:24.760] I keep a bullpup, I said, and I object to rouse because my nerves are shaken, and I
  236. [14:24.760 --> 14:28.920] get up at all sorts of ungodly hours, and I am extremely lazy.
  237. [14:28.920 --> 14:34.320] I have another set of vices when I am well, but those are the principal ones at present.
  238. [14:34.320 --> 14:38.720] Do you include violin playing in your category of rouse?
  239. [14:38.720 --> 14:39.720] he asked anxiously.
  240. [14:39.720 --> 14:42.760] It depends on the player, I answered.
  241. [14:42.760 --> 14:46.960] A well played violin is a treat for the gods, a badly played one.
  242. [14:46.960 --> 14:49.560] Ah, that's all right, he cried with a merry laugh.
  243. [14:49.560 --> 14:54.720] I think we may consider the thing is settled, that is, if the rooms are agreeable to you.
  244. [14:54.720 --> 14:55.720] When shall we see them?
  245. [14:55.720 --> 15:00.160] Call for me here at noon tomorrow, and we'll go together and settle everything, he answered.
  246. [15:00.160 --> 15:03.480] All right, noon exactly, said I, shaking his hand.
  247. [15:03.480 --> 15:08.000] We left him working among his chemicals, and we walked together towards my hotel.
  248. [15:08.000 --> 15:14.160] By the way, I asked suddenly, stopping and turning upon Stanford, how the deuce did he
  249. [15:14.160 --> 15:17.440] know that I'd come from Afghanistan?
  250. [15:17.440 --> 15:20.200] My companion smiled an enigmetical smile.
  251. [15:20.200 --> 15:25.080] That's just his little peculiarity, he said, a good many people have wanted to know how
  252. [15:25.080 --> 15:26.400] he finds things out.
  253. [15:26.400 --> 15:28.240] Oh, a mystery, is it?
  254. [15:28.240 --> 15:30.560] I cried, rubbing my hands.
  255. [15:30.560 --> 15:31.560] This is very pecan't.
  256. [15:31.560 --> 15:34.440] I'm much obliged to you for bringing us together.
  257. [15:34.440 --> 15:38.400] The proper study of mankind is man, you know.
  258. [15:38.400 --> 15:41.840] You must study him, then, Stanford said, as he bade me goodbye.
  259. [15:41.840 --> 15:43.360] You'll find him a knotty problem, though.
  260. [15:43.360 --> 15:46.880] I'll wager he learns more about you than you about him.
  261. [15:46.880 --> 15:47.880] Goodbye.
  262. [15:47.880 --> 15:50.160] Goodbye, I answered, and strolled onto my bed.
  263. [15:50.160 --> 15:53.560] Goodbye, hotel, considerably interested in my new acquaintance.
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