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  1.  
  2. You had symptoms in several categories of disorders covered in this test. This suggests that you should probably consult with a mental health professional for further testing or treatment, especially if you are distressed about the symptoms you are experiencing. There is most certainly a treatment out there that will help improve the symptoms you are experiencing.
  3.  
  4. The following are the areas of concern detected by the screening:
  5.  
  6. Substance Abuse
  7. Your answers indicate that you show strong signs and symptoms of substance abuse. According to the DSM-IV, the use of drugs or alcohol is considered abuse when it leads to problems in your life but not to physical addiction or to a compulsion to take the substance.
  8.  
  9. The signs and symptoms of substance abuse listed in the DSM-IV are as follows:
  10.  
  11. Failure to live up to the obligations of work, school or home life as a result of the substance use.
  12. Use of substance in situations that are physically dangerous for you or for others.
  13. Legal problems associated with use of the substance (drunk driving or drug possession arrests; arrests after fights or other altercations while under the influence, etc.).
  14. Use of the drug continues despite negative consequences to relationships or other interpersonal problems.
  15. In order to meet the criteria for substance abuse, you must display at least one of the above signs for at least a 12-month period. It is important to speak to a professional to discuss the severity and frequency of your drug/alcohol use. If you continue with this behavior, you could be putting your own health and well-being at risk, as well as that of others.
  16.  
  17. Panic Disorder
  18. Your responses suggest that you may be suffering from Panic Disorder. This means that you experience repeated periods of intense fear or physical discomfort, which occur without warning or obvious precipitating events. These attacks are disturbing to you or cause you to limit your activities.
  19.  
  20. The DSM-IV criteria for Panic Disorder are as follows:
  21.  
  22. Recurrent attacks of at least four of the following symptoms:
  23. Heart palpitations, feeling like the heart is racing or pounding.
  24. Sweating.
  25. Trembling or shaking.
  26. Shortness of breath, sensation of being smothered or choked.
  27. Chest pain.
  28. Nausea or other forms of stomach upset.
  29. Feeling dizzy, lightheaded, or faint.
  30. Feeling detached from reality or a sensation of being outside of oneself.
  31. Fear of losing control or going "crazy".
  32. Fear of dying.
  33. Numbing or tingling sensations.
  34. Chills or hot flashes.
  35. The attack or attacks have been followed by a minimum of one month in which the person experiences one of more of the following:
  36. Persistent concern and worry about having another panic attack.
  37. Worry about what the attacks mean, what could be causing them, or what could happen as a result of the attacks.
  38. Change of behavior as a result of the attacks.
  39. The person is not suffering from Agoraphobia, which is roughly defined as being anxious about suffering a panic attack in situations where escape is difficult or embarrassing, and limiting behavior as a result of this anxiety.
  40. The panic attacks are not due to another disorder, such as Social Phobia (e.g. if they occurred mostly in social situations), Specific Phobia (e.g. if they had only one type of situation or object that caused them to experience attacks), Obsessive-compulsive Disorder, or Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (in response to things that remind them of the difficult scenario.
  41. Panic Disorder can be debilitating. Untreated, it can be a frightening and limiting disorder. If you feel that you are suffering from this, speak to a mental health professional to prevent it from further disrupting your life and to develop a treatment plan that fits your needs. The treatments used might include Exposure Therapy, which slowly builds up from mildly frightening situations to more frightening ones, or other forms of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. These forms of therapy will usually be used in conjunction with pharmaceutical drugs, including anti-anxiety drugs and some forms of anti-depressants.
  42.  
  43. Relational Difficulties
  44. Your responses indicated that your relationships are at least in some way dysfunctional, and may be causing problems in your life. While not an official diagnosis in the DSM IV, there has been some discussion about adding relationship issues to the next edition. The bottom line is that if you are unhappy with the way you relate with others, or feel that a particular relationship you have with someone is unhealthy, seeking help from a therapist can help you resolve these issues.
  45.  
  46. Pedophilia
  47. Your responses in this section indicate that you have a sexual interest in children. These abnormal sexual impulses towards minors are a major concern. Seek help immediately to prevent yourself from acting on these impulses.
  48.  
  49. Voyeurism
  50. It appears from your responses that you have a strong desire to view other people in the nude or having sexual contact, which is called voyeurism. Your strong desire to view the intimate moments of others is a concern if you actually seek out such experiences. In many cases, you may actually be breaking the law. Seek therapy if this is the case for you.
  51.  
  52. Exhibitionism
  53. It appears from your responses that you show signs of exhibitionism. Your strong desire to expose yourself to others without consent is a cause for concern, especially if you actually seek out such experiences. By acting out these desires, you would likely be breaking the law. Seek therapy if this is the case with you.
  54.  
  55. Frotteurism
  56. Your answers on this assessment indicate that you appear to have a strong desire to rub yourself against un-consenting strangers. This is a cause for concern if you actually seek out such experiences. By acting out these desires, you are likely breaking the law. Seek therapy if this is the case with you.
  57.  
  58. Anorexia Nervosa
  59. You appear to be suffering from Anorexia Nervosa. This means that you are unwilling or unable to consume enough food to maintain a healthy body weight. This is a devastating disorder if left unchecked, and can lead to serious health problems if too much weight is lost. Visit your doctor to take the first steps to recovery.
  60.  
  61. The following signs and symptoms are listed in the DSM-IV criteria for Anorexia Nervosa:
  62.  
  63. Failure to maintain a body weight of at least 85% of what is normally expected for a person's age, height, and sex as a result of weight loss, or a failure to gain what is expected during a period of growth.
  64. Intense fear about gaining weight or eventually becoming overweight, even when the person is currently underweight.
  65. Person has an inaccurate picture of his or her body shape or weight, feels that his or her self-worth is dependent upon his or her weight, or is in denial regarding the severity of his or her loss of weight.
  66. In females who should be menstruating (i.e. those who have reached puberty, are not pregnant, and who have not reached menopause) there are at least three missed periods.
  67. There are two types of Anorexia Nervosa: the Restricting Type and the Binge-Eating/Purging Type. The Restricting Type of anorexic achieves weight loss due to strictly restricting the amount of food consumed. The Binge-eating/Purging Type of anorexic eats excessively, but this is compensated by behaviors such as vomiting, excessive exercise or laxatives to achieve inordinate weight loss.
  68.  
  69. Your health and well-being depends on you getting help for your disorder. See a medical or mental health professional as soon as possible.
  70.  
  71. Compulsive Gambling
  72. You appear to have trouble controlling your impulse to gamble, in a way that is negatively impacting your life. Since you are in some way unhappy with your gambling habit, you would be well-served to seek help from an organization such as Gamblers Anonymous.
  73.  
  74. Here is a link where you can find contact information for organizations that are out there to help problem gamblers:
  75.  
  76. Gamblers Anonymous
  77.  
  78. Symptoms Detected
  79. You show symptoms of several mental health disorders. While they have not reached the level of full diagnosis, seeking the advice of a therapist is recommended, as the symptoms may become overwhelming, more frequent, and more serious.
  80.  
  81. Major Depressive Disorder
  82. Your responses indicate that you have some symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder, but not enough for a full diagnosis. A person with this disorder feels unhappy, sad or empty most of the time, and these feelings cannot be explained by a recent loss or by a medical condition.
  83.  
  84. The DSM-IV states that the signs and symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder in adults are as follows:
  85.  
  86. At least one of the first two symptoms and at least five in total from the following:
  87.  
  88. An abnormally sad, low, or empty mood that spans most of every day, for at least two weeks.
  89. Loss of interest and pleasure in activities that are normally found to be enjoyable.
  90. Changes in appetite or abnormal weight loss or weight gain.
  91. Sleep difficulty - either sleeping too much or suffering from insomnia or early waking.
  92. Appearance of being abnormally energetic or agitated or, conversely, being unusually sluggish.
  93. Extreme fatigue and lowered energy level.
  94. Feelings of guilt and regret of personal decisions.
  95. Lack of concentration and inability to make decisions.
  96. Thoughts of death and suicide.
  97. There are many treatments available for depression - many different medications, along with various forms of psychotherapy. One method that many people find particularly helpful is Cognitive Therapy, during which you can learn methods to address the depressive thoughts and negative self-talk that are common in this disorder.
  98.  
  99. Suicide Prevention Hotlines and Resources:
  100.  
  101. If you are thinking of suicide, please do reach out to get the help you need. Here are some links and phone numbers that can get you started:
  102.  
  103. In the United States:
  104.  
  105. 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433)
  106.  
  107. In Canada, the United States and Internationally, click here and follow the links to your country or area:
  108.  
  109. If you are unable to find resources on your own, see a physician or go to an emergency room - someone there should be able to help you. Do not suffer in silence.
  110.  
  111. Manic Episodes
  112. You appear to have showed some signs of experiencing a manic episode. People who experience manic episodes have times when they feel extreme emotional "highs" accompanied by a variety of other symptoms, such as racing thoughts, extreme talkativeness, and reduced need for sleep, among others.
  113.  
  114. According to the DSM-IV, a manic episode consists of the following:
  115.  
  116. A discrete period of time when there is an extremely elevated or expansive mood, or high levels of irritability.
  117. As well as three or more of the following symptoms:
  118.  
  119. Exaggerated sense of self-esteem or grandiosity.
  120. Greatly reduced need for sleep.
  121. Excessive talkativeness and feeling of internal pressure to keep talking.
  122. Thoughts race quickly and change rapidly from topic to topic.
  123. More easily distracted than usual.
  124. Increase in goal-setting activity or in unproductive physical activity, such as fidgeting, pacing, or finger-tapping.
  125. Risky, impulsive, and unconsidered behavior, with the potential for serious and long-term consequences (e.g. reckless spending, sex with strangers, foolish business decisions).
  126. The symptoms must be severe enough to disrupt functioning in important life areas, such as the ability to function at work, to have healthy relationships, and to take care of oneself. If hospitalization is required, this criterion is considered to have been met.
  127.  
  128. If you feel that your symptoms are a problem for you, speaking with a professional therapist or psychiatrist, or a medical professional is your first step towards obtaining help. The most effective treatment for Bipolar Disorder appears to be pharmaceutical drugs, in particular lithium, anticonvulsant mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Cognitive Therapy might also be useful for Bipolar patients, mostly to assist in understanding the illness, dealing with its consequences, preventing relapse (monitoring symptoms and adjusting medications before a full-blown relapse occurs), and ensuring adherence to the drug regime.
  129.  
  130. Bipolar Disorder
  131. You appear to have some symptoms of Bipolar Disorder, but not enough to meet all the criteria for a diagnosis. A person is considered to have this disorder if they have experienced one or more Manic episodes or Mixed episodes (a Mixed episode refers to manic episodes interspersed with depressive episodes in quick succession).
  132.  
  133. According to the DSM-IV, these are the criteria for a Manic episode, the main requirement for Bipolar disorder:
  134.  
  135. A discrete period of time where there is an extremely elevated or expansive mood, or high levels of irritability.
  136. As well as three or more of the following symptoms:
  137.  
  138. Exaggerated sense of self-esteem or grandiosity.
  139. Need for sleep is greatly reduced.
  140. Excessive talkativeness and feeling of pressure to keep talking.
  141. Thoughts race quickly and change rapidly from topic to topic.
  142. The individual is more easily distracted than usual.
  143. Increase in goal-setting activity or in unproductive physical activity, such as fidgeting, pacing, or finger-tapping.
  144. Taking part in risky, impulsive, and unconsidered behavior, with the potential for serious and long-term consequences (reckless spending, sex with strangers, foolish business decisions).
  145. The symptoms must be severe enough to disrupt functioning in important life areas, such as the ability to function at work, to have healthy relationships, and to take care of oneself. If hospitalization is required, this criterion is considered to have been met.
  146.  
  147. There are a number of similar disorders in the Bipolar spectrum. If you are concerned about the symptoms you might be experiencing related to this disorder, speaking with a professional therapist, psychiatrist, or a medical professional is your first step towards obtaining a definite diagnosis. The most effective treatment for Bipolar Disorder appears to be pharmaceutical drugs, in particular lithium, anticonvulsant mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Cognitive Therapy might also be useful for Bipolar patients, mostly to assist in understanding the illness, dealing with its consequences, preventing relapse (monitoring symptoms and adjusting medications before a full-blown relapse occurs), and ensuring adherence to the drug regime.
  148.  
  149. Suicide Prevention Hotlines and Resources:
  150.  
  151. If you are thinking of suicide, please do reach out to get the help you need. Here are some links and phone numbers that can get you started.
  152.  
  153. In the United States:
  154.  
  155. 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433)
  156.  
  157. In Canada, the United States and Internationally, click here and follow the links to your country or area:
  158.  
  159. If you are unable to find resources on your own, see a physician or go to an emergency room - someone there should be able to help you. Do not suffer in silence.
  160.  
  161. Specific Phobia
  162. You show some signs of suffering from a Specific Phobia, but not enough for a definitive diagnosis. People with a Specific Phobia have a strong, unreasonable fear of a particular object or situation.
  163.  
  164. The DSM-IV describes the signs and symptoms of Specific Phobia as follows:
  165.  
  166. Excessive fear of an object of situation that is cued either by the presence or anticipation of being exposed to that stimulus.
  167. Exposure of the object or situation almost always provokes a strong and immediate anxious response, or results in panic attacks related to the phobia.
  168. The fear is recognized by the individual as being unreasonable and out of proportion.
  169. Contact with the object or situation is avoided if at all possible, or endured only with great anxiety and/or distress.
  170. The issues surrounding the phobia, such as distress, panic attacks, and avoidance of the phobia interfere with the individual's life.
  171. The symptoms of Specific Phobia cannot be better explained by another disorder, such as Panic Disorder, Social Phobia, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.
  172. This type of phobia can often be easily treated with Cognitive or Behavioral Therapy techniques. Exposure Therapy, for example, slowly builds up from mildly frightening situations to more frightening ones in order to reduce the phobic reaction. Flooding, which entails placing the individual into the situation they find frightening and then teaching them how to relax in that scenario, can also help. Drug therapies might also be used.
  173.  
  174. Social Phobia
  175. Your responses suggest that you show some signs of suffering from a Social Phobia, but not enough to meet the criteria for this disorder. People diagnosed with this disorder have a strong, irrational fear related to social situations or public speaking.
  176.  
  177. The DSM-IV specifies the following signs and symptoms as being necessary for the diagnosis of Social Phobia:
  178.  
  179. Extreme and persistent fear regarding social interactions or situations where the person must appear in front of others; the individual worries about embarrassing him or herself as well as showing his or her anxiety to others.
  180. Being exposed to social or performance situations invokes a great deal of anxiety and/or leads to panic attacks in response to the anxiety.
  181. The person realizes that his or her reaction to these situations is above and beyond what is reasonable.
  182. Contact with unfamiliar others and performance situations is avoided if at all possible, or endured only with great deal of anxiety and/or distress.
  183. The issues surrounding the phobia, such as distress, panic attacks, and avoidance of the phobia interfere with the individual's life.
  184. The symptoms of Simple Phobia cannot be better explained by another disorder, such as Panic Disorder with or without Agoraphobia, a Developmental Disorder, Schizoid Personality Disorder or Body Dysmorphic Disorder.
  185. Social skills training can be of great help for people with this disorder, as can Exposure Therapy, which slowly builds up from mildly frightening situations to more frightening ones. Flooding, which entails placing the individual directly into the situation they find frightening and then teaching them how to relax in that scenario, can also help. Drug therapies might also be used to quell some of the anxiety experienced in social situations. Speak to a professional to confirm the diagnosis and determine a treatment plan for you.
  186.  
  187. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
  188. You appear to suffer from a few of the symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder; however, you do not meet all the criteria. This disorder entails recurrent obsessions (excessive and uncontrollable thoughts) and/or compulsions (uncontrollable, repetitive behaviors) that are disruptive to the individual's functioning, are distressing to him or her, are time consuming and recognized by him or her as being excessive.
  189.  
  190. The DSM-IV lists the following signs and symptoms that point to Obsessive Compulsive Disorder:
  191.  
  192. Obsessions and/or compulsions must occur.
  193. Obsessions consist of all of the following:
  194.  
  195. Recurrent thoughts, impulses or images that keep popping up uncontrollably, are recognized as not being appropriate, and that cause distress and concern in the individual.
  196. These thoughts and worries experienced are not simply extreme examples of worry about real-life problems.
  197. The individual tries to repress these thoughts, images, or impulses or prevent them from occurring by performing another action or thought.
  198. The individual recognizes that these thoughts, images, and impulses are a product of his or her own mind.
  199. Compulsions consist of both of the following:
  200.  
  201. The person performs repetitive behaviors (washing his or her hands, checking that the doors in his or house are locked over and over, or repetitively straightening objects in his or her house, and similar behaviors) or mental acts (counting to the same number over and over, praying, repeating words or phrases internally) in response to an obsession.
  202. These behaviors are either meant to calm the individual, or are aimed at preventing something bad from happening; however, these actions cannot logically stop these things from occurring or are clearly excessive.
  203. In addtion...
  204.  
  205. The obsessions and/or compulsions are seen as unreasonable and/or excessive.
  206. They are also disturbing to the individual, take up unreasonable amounts of his or her time, or interfere with his or her life.
  207. These obsessions or compulsions are not solely related to another disorder, or a result of a drug or medication, or a medical condition.
  208. Treatment for OCD can be very effective. They include medications, or behavioral and cognitive therapy, among others. A mental health professional can assist you in developing a treatment plan to help you.
  209.  
  210. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  211. You show some of the signs of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) but do not fulfill all the diagnostic criteria. This disorder, which can occur after a traumatic experience, involves intense feelings of anxiety and even flashbacks of the experience.
  212.  
  213. The DSM-IV describes the following signs and symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder:
  214.  
  215. The person witnessed, experienced, or was otherwise confronted with a traumatic event or series of events that involved threat of death or injury to him or herself or others.
  216. The person's response to this event involved intense fear, feelings of helplessness, or horror.
  217. The person repeatedly re-experiences the event in at least one of the following forms:
  218. Repetitive, intrusive recollections of the event, including images, thoughts or perceptions (visions, hearing or smelling the same smell or sounds that occurred that day, etc.).
  219. Recurrent dreams or nightmares about the event in question.
  220. Feeling as if he or she is reliving the traumatic experience (i.e., experiencing flashbacks, hallucinations or other vivid sense of experiencing the event again).
  221. The person experiences extreme psychological distress upon being reminded of or thinking about the traumatic experience.
  222. The person has an actual physical reaction upon being reminded of or thinking about the traumatic experience.
  223. The individual avoids experiencing stimuli associated with the traumatic event or shows signs of general numbing of feelings and interest in everyday life, in the form of three or more of the following:
  224. Avoiding thinking about or discussing the traumatic event.
  225. Avoiding the place, people, or activities that are associated with the traumatic event.
  226. Blocking out (experiencing amnesia about) important memories associated with the precipitating event.
  227. Diminished interest in or participation in formerly enjoyed activities.
  228. Feelings of emotional detachment or estrangement from others.
  229. Dampening of emotions -- feeling that emotions have a restricted range, i.e. unable to feel love towards others.
  230. Expectations about future are foreshortened; that is, the person believes that his or her life will be cut short, or that he or she will never reach normal milestones, such as marriage, birth of children, career, etc.
  231. The person experiences frequent and persistent symptoms of increased physiological arousal (his or her body appears ready to react rapidly in case of another stressful event), in the form of two or more of the following:
  232. The person has difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.
  233. He or she appears irritable or has emotional or angry outbursts.
  234. He or she experiences difficulty concentrating.
  235. His or her senses are hypervigilant and she or he appears to be constantly on the lookout for threats.
  236. He or she startles easily.
  237. The symptoms related to this experience went on for more than one month and caused distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.
  238. You've experienced a traumatic event in your life, and are obviously suffering. A mental health professional can help guide you in the healing process and can help you learn to live with the memories of this difficult experience. The treatments for PTSD include Exposure Therapy, which slowly builds up from mildly frightening situations to more frightening ones, as well as relaxation techniques for handling anxiety and group therapy, among others.
  239.  
  240. Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  241. Your answers indicate that you show some of the signs of Generalized Anxiety Disorder, but not enough of them to meet all the criteria. People suffering with this disorder are on edge most of the time, with no obvious precipitating event. This is a very common disorder and there are many effective treatments available.
  242.  
  243. The DSM-IV states that the following signs and symptoms must be apparent for a diagnosis of Generalized Anxiety Disorder to be made:
  244.  
  245. The individual must experience excessive anxiety and worry more days than not for a minimum of six months. The concern must be about a number of different events or areas of life, not focused on one or two specific issues.
  246. The person must have a difficult time controlling his or her worry.
  247. The anxiety and worry must be associated with at least three of the following physical or emotional symptoms:
  248. Feelings of restlessness, edginess, or unease.
  249. Feeling easily fatigued.
  250. Difficulty maintaining concentration or a feeling of his or her mind going blank.
  251. Irritability.
  252. Tense muscles.
  253. Sleep disturbance in the form of insomnia or difficulty staying asleep, or feeling unsatisfied with his or her sleep.
  254. The anxiety and worry must not occur solely as a result of another disorder, such as Social Phobia, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Anorexia or Bulimia, Post-Traumatic Disorder, Panic Disorder, Somatization Disorder, or Hypochondriasis.
  255. The anxiety, worry and accompanying physical and emotional symptoms must cause the person distress or lead to impairment of his or her functioning at work, in his or her personal life, or in other life areas.
  256. The anxiety is not due to a physical condition or drug use (illegal or medical), and does not occur only during a mood disorder such as Depression, in the course of a Psychotic Disorder, or due to a Pervasive Developmental Disorder (such as Autism).
  257. Treatments for Generalized Anxiety Disorder include anti-anxiety medications, relaxation therapy, and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.
  258.  
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