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  1.  
  2.   Hush-a-bye, baby, on the tree-top,
  3.   When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
  4.   When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,
  5.   Down will come baby, bough, cradle, and all.
  6.  
  7.        *       *       *       *       *
  8.  
  9.   Rock-a-bye, baby, thy cradle is green;
  10.   Father's a nobleman, mother's a Queen;
  11.   Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring;
  12.   And Johnny's a drummer, and drums for the King.
  13.  
  14.        *       *       *       *       *
  15.  
  16.   Bye, baby bunting,
  17.   Daddy's gone a-hunting,
  18.   To get a little rabbit-skin,
  19.   To wrap his baby bunting in.
  20.  
  21.        *       *       *       *       *
  22.  
  23.   Hush thee, my babby,
  24.   Lie still with thy daddy,
  25.   Thy mammy has gone to the mill,
  26.     To grind thee some wheat
  27.     To make thee some meat,
  28.   And so, my dear babby, lie still.
  29.  
  30.        *       *       *       *       *
  31.  
  32.       Sleep, baby, sleep!
  33.     Thy father watches the sheep;
  34.   Thy mother is shaking the dream-land tree,
  35.   And down falls a little dream on thee:
  36.       Sleep, baby, sleep!
  37.  
  38.       Sleep, baby, sleep.
  39.     The large stars are the sheep,
  40.   The wee stars are the lambs, I guess,
  41.   The fair moon is the shepherdess:
  42.       Sleep, baby, sleep!
  43.  
  44.        *       *       *       *       *
  45.  
  46.   This little pig went to market;
  47.   This little pig stayed at home;
  48.   This little pig had roast beef;
  49.   This little pig had none;
  50.   This little pig said, "Wee, wee!
  51.   I can't find my way home."
  52.  
  53.        *       *       *       *       *
  54.  
  55.   Brow bender,
  56.   Eye peeper,
  57.   Nose smeller,
  58.   Mouth eater,
  59.   Chin chopper.
  60.   Knock at the door--peep in
  61.   Lift up the latch--walk in
  62.  
  63.   Eye winker,
  64.   Tom Tinker,
  65.   Nose smeller,
  66.   Mouth eater,
  67.   Chin chopper.
  68.   Chin chopper.
  69.  
  70.        *       *       *       *       *
  71.  
  72.   Here sits the Lord Mayor,
  73.   Here sit his two men,
  74.   Here sits the cock,
  75.   And here sits the hen;
  76.   Here sit the chickens,
  77.   And here they go in,
  78.   Chippety, chippety, chippety chin.
  79.  
  80.        *       *       *       *       *
  81.  
  82.   Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man!
  83.   So I do, master, as fast as I can:
  84.   Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with T,
  85.   Put it in the oven for Tommy and me.
  86.  
  87.        *       *       *       *       *
  88.  
  89.   Pat it, kiss it,
  90.   Stroke it, bless it;
  91.   Three days' sunshine, three days' rain,
  92.   Little hand all well again.
  93.  
  94.        *       *       *       *       *
  95.  
  96.   Baa, baa, black sheep,
  97.     Have you any wool?
  98.   Yes, marry, have I,
  99.     Three bags full:
  100.  
  101.   One for my master,
  102.     One for my dame,
  103.   And one for the little boy
  104.     Who lives in the lane.
  105.  
  106.        *       *       *       *       *
  107.  
  108.   Pussy-cat, pussy-cat,
  109.     Where have you been?
  110.   I've been to London
  111.     To look at the Queen
  112.  
  113.   Pussy-cat, pussy-cat,
  114.     What did you there?
  115.   I frightened a little mouse
  116.     Under her chair.
  117.  
  118.        *       *       *       *       *
  119.  
  120.   Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
  121.   To see an old lady upon a white horse,
  122.   Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes,
  123.   She shall have music wherever she goes.
  124.  
  125.        *       *       *       *       *
  126.  
  127.   Bobby Shaftoe's gone to sea,
  128.   Silver buckles on his knee;
  129.   He'll come back and marry me,
  130.     Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
  131.  
  132.   Bobby Shaftoe's fat and fair,
  133.   Combing down his yellow hair;
  134.   He's my love for evermair,
  135.     Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
  136.  
  137.        *       *       *       *       *
  138.  
  139.   Tom, he was a piper's son,
  140.   He learned to play when he was young,
  141.   And all the tune that he could play
  142.   Was, "Over the hills and far away,"
  143.   Over the hills, and a great way off,
  144.   The wind will blow my top-knot off.
  145.  
  146.   Now, Tom with his pipe made such a noise
  147.   That he well pleased both the girls and boys,
  148.   And they always stopped to hear him play
  149.     "Over the hills and far away."
  150.  
  151.        *       *       *       *       *
  152.  
  153.   Lady-bird, lady-bird, fly away home,
  154.   Thy house is on fire, thy children all gone:
  155.   All but one whose name is Ann,
  156.   And she crept under the pudding-pan.
  157.  
  158.        *       *       *       *       *
  159.  
  160.   The north wind doth blow,
  161.   And we shall have snow,
  162.   And what will the robin do then,
  163.             Poor thing?
  164.  
  165.   He'll sit in a barn,
  166.   And keep himself warm,
  167.   And hide his head under his wing,
  168.             Poor thing!
  169.  
  170.        *       *       *       *       *
  171.  
  172.   I had a little pony,
  173.   His name was Dapple-gray,
  174.   I lent him to a lady,
  175.     To ride a mile away;
  176.   She whipped him, she lashed him,
  177.     She rode him through the mire;
  178.   I would not lend my pony now
  179.     For all the lady's hire.
  180.  
  181.        *       *       *       *       *
  182.  
  183.   I had a little doggy that used to sit and beg;
  184.   But Doggy tumbled down the stairs and broke his little leg.
  185.   Oh! Doggy, I will nurse you, and try to make you well,
  186.   And you shall have a collar with a little silver bell.
  187.  
  188.        *       *       *       *       *
  189.  
  190.   Simple Simon met a pieman,
  191.     Going to the fair;
  192.   Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
  193.     "Let me taste your ware."
  194.  
  195.   Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
  196.     "Show me first your penny."
  197.   Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
  198.     "Indeed I have not any."
  199.  
  200.   Simple Simon went a-fishing
  201.     For to catch a whale;
  202.   But all the water he could find
  203.     Was in his mother's pail!
  204.  
  205.        *       *       *       *       *
  206.  
  207.   Jack and Jill went up the hill,
  208.     To fetch a pail of water;
  209.   Jack fell down, and broke his crown
  210.     And Jill came tumbling after.
  211.  
  212.   Up Jack got and home did trot
  213.     As fast as he could caper;
  214.   Went to bed to mend his head
  215.     With vinegar and brown paper.
  216.  
  217.   Jill came in and she did grin,
  218.     To see his paper plaster,
  219.   Mother, vexed, did whip her next,
  220.     For causing Jack's disaster.
  221.  
  222.        *       *       *       *       *
  223.  
  224.   Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn,
  225.   The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn,
  226.   Where's the boy that looks after the sheep?
  227.   He's under the haycock, fast asleep.
  228.  
  229.        *       *       *       *       *
  230.  
  231.   Old Mother Goose, when
  232.     She wanted to wander,
  233.   Would ride through the air
  234.     On a very fine gander.
  235.  
  236.   Mother Goose had a house,
  237.     'T was built in a wood,
  238.   Where an owl at the door
  239.     For sentinel stood.
  240.  
  241.   She had a son Jack,
  242.     A plain-looking lad;
  243.   He was not very good,
  244.     Nor yet very bad.
  245.  
  246.   She sent him to market,
  247.    A live goose he bought:
  248.   "Here! mother," says he,
  249.     "It will not go for nought."
  250.  
  251.   Jack's goose and her gander
  252.     Grew very fond;
  253.   They'd both eat together,
  254.     Or swim in one pond.
  255.  
  256.   Jack found one morning,
  257.     As I have been told,
  258.   His goose had laid him
  259.     An egg of pure gold.
  260.  
  261.   Jack rode to his mother,
  262.     The news for to tell.
  263.   She called him a good boy,
  264.     And said it was well.
  265.  
  266.        *       *       *       *       *
  267.  
  268.   Goosey, goosey, gander,
  269.     Where shall I wander?
  270.   Upstairs, downstairs,
  271.     And in my lady's chamber.
  272.   There I met an old man
  273.     Who would not say his prayers;
  274.   I took him by the left leg,
  275.     And threw him downstairs.
  276.  
  277.        *       *       *       *       *
  278.  
  279.   I'll tell you a story
  280.   About Mary Morey,
  281.     And now my story's begun,
  282.     I'll tell you another
  283.   About her brother,
  284.     And now my story's done.
  285.  
  286.        *       *       *       *       *
  287.  
  288.   Three wise men of Gotham,
  289.   Went to sea in a bowl;
  290.   If the bowl had been stronger,
  291.   My song had been longer.
  292.  
  293.        *       *       *       *       *
  294.  
  295.   There was a crooked man,
  296.     And he went a crooked mile,
  297.   He found a crooked sixpence
  298.     Upon a crooked stile:
  299.   He bought a crooked cat,
  300.     That caught a crooked mouse--
  301.   And they all lived together
  302.     In a little crooked house.
  303.  
  304.        *       *       *       *       *
  305.  
  306.   There was a man in our town,
  307.     And he was wondrous wise,
  308.   He jumped into a bramble bush,
  309.     And scratched out both his eyes;
  310.   But when he saw his eyes were out,
  311.     With all his might and main,
  312.   He jumped into another bush,
  313.     And scratched 'em in again.
  314.  
  315.        *       *       *       *       *
  316.  
  317.     Hey! diddle diddle,
  318.     The cat and the fiddle,
  319.   The cow jumped over the moon;
  320.     The little dog laughed
  321.     To see such sport,
  322.   While the dish ran away with the spoon.
  323.  
  324.        *       *       *       *       *
  325.  
  326.   Hickory, dickory, dock,
  327.   The mouse ran up the clock;
  328.     The clock struck one,
  329.     The mouse ran down,
  330.   Hickory, dickory, dock.
  331.  
  332.        *       *       *       *       *
  333.  
  334.   There was an old woman who lived in a shoe,
  335.   She had so many children she didn't know what to do;
  336.   She gave them some broth without any bread,
  337.   She whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.
  338.  
  339.        *       *       *       *       *
  340.  
  341.     Little Miss Muffet
  342.     Sat on a tuffet,
  343.   Eating her curds and whey;
  344.     There came a great spider,
  345.     And sat down beside her,
  346.   And frightened Miss Muffet away.
  347.  
  348.        *       *       *       *       *
  349.  
  350.   If all the seas were one sea,
  351.   What a _great_ sea that would be!
  352.   And if all the trees were one tree,
  353.   What a _great_ tree that would be!
  354.   And if all the axes were one axe,
  355.   What a _great_ axe that would be!
  356.   And if all the men were one man,
  357.   What a _great_ man he would be!
  358.   And if the _great_ man took the _great_ axe,
  359.   And cut down the _great_ tree,
  360.   And let it fall into the _great_ sea,
  361.   What a splish splash _that_ would be!
  362.  
  363.        *       *       *       *       *
  364.  
  365.   There was an old man,
  366.   And he had a calf,
  367.     And that's half;
  368.  
  369.   He took him out of the stall,
  370.   And tied him to the wall,
  371.     And that's all.
  372.  
  373.        *       *       *       *       *
  374.  
  375.   The man in the wilderness asked me,
  376.   How many strawberries grew in the sea?
  377.   I answered him as I thought good,
  378.   As many as red herrings grew in the wood
  379.  
  380.        *       *       *       *       *
  381.  
  382.   If all the world were apple-pie,
  383.     And all the sea were ink,
  384.   And all the trees were bread and cheese,
  385.     What should we have for drink?
  386.  
  387.        *       *       *       *       *
  388.  
  389.   I saw a ship a-sailing,
  390.   A-sailing on the sea;
  391.   And it was full of pretty things
  392.   For baby and for me.
  393.  
  394.   There were sweetmeats in the cabin,
  395.   And apples in the hold;
  396.   The sails were made of silk,
  397.   And the masts were made of gold.
  398.  
  399.   The four-and-twenty sailors
  400.   That stood between the decks,
  401.   Were four-and-twenty white mice.
  402.   With chains about their necks.
  403.  
  404.   The captain was a duck,
  405.   With a packet on his back;
  406.   And when the ship began to move,
  407.   The captain cried, "Quack, quack!"
  408.  
  409.        *       *       *       *       *
  410.  
  411.     My dear, do you know,
  412.     How a long time ago,
  413.       Two poor little children,
  414.     Whose names I don't know,
  415.   Were stolen away on a fine summer's day,
  416.   And left in a wood, as I've heard people say.
  417.  
  418.     And when it was night,
  419.     So sad was their plight!
  420.       The sun it went down,
  421.     And the moon gave no light!
  422.   They sobbed and they sighed, and they bitterly cried
  423.   And the poor little things, they lay down and died.
  424.  
  425.     And when they were dead,
  426.     The robins so red,
  427.       Brought strawberry-leaves
  428.     And over them spread;
  429.       And all the day long,
  430.       They sung them this song:
  431.   "Poor babes in the wood! Poor babes in the wood!
  432.   Oh don't you remember the babes in the wood?"
  433.  
  434.        *       *       *       *       *
  435.  
  436.   The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts
  437.     All on a summer's day;
  438.   The Knave of Hearts, he stole the tarts,
  439.     And took them clean away.
  440.  
  441.   The King of Hearts called for the tarts,
  442.     And beat the Knave full sore;
  443.   The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts,
  444.     And vowed he'd steal no more.
  445.  
  446.        *       *       *       *       *
  447.  
  448.   I had a little husband,
  449.     No bigger than my thumb;
  450.   I put him in a pint-pot,
  451.     And there I bade him drum.
  452.  
  453.   I bought a little horse,
  454.     That galloped up and down;
  455.   I bridled him, and saddled
  456.     And sent him out of town.
  457.  
  458.   I gave him little garters,
  459.     To garter up his hose,
  460.   And a little handkerchief,
  461.     To wipe his little nose.
  462.  
  463.        *       *       *       *       *
  464.  
  465.   Sing a song of sixpence,
  466.     A pocket full of rye;
  467.   Four-and-twenty blackbirds
  468.     Baked in a pie;
  469.  
  470.   When the pie was opened
  471.     The birds began to sing;
  472.   Was not that a dainty dish
  473.     To set before the King?
  474.  
  475.   The King was in his counting-house,
  476.     Counting out his money;
  477.   The Queen was in the parlor,
  478.     Eating bread and honey;
  479.  
  480.   The maid was in the garden
  481.     Hanging out the clothes;
  482.   When up came a blackbird,
  483.     And nipped off her nose.
  484.  
  485.        *       *       *       *       *
  486.  
  487.   Little Bo-peep, she lost her sheep,
  488.     And can't tell where to find them;
  489.   Leave them alone, and they'll come home,
  490.     And bring their tails behind them.
  491.  
  492.   Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
  493.     And dreamed she heard them bleating;
  494.   When she awoke she found it a joke,
  495.     For they still were all fleeting.
  496.  
  497.   Then up she took her little crook,
  498.     Determined for to find them;
  499.   She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
  500.     For they'd left their tails behind them!
  501.  
  502.   It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray,
  503.     Unto a meadow hard by--
  504.   There she espied their tails side by side,
  505.     All hung on a tree to dry.
  506.  
  507.   She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
  508.     And over the hillocks she raced;
  509.   And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should,
  510.     That each tail should be properly placed.
  511.  
  512.        *       *       *       *       *
  513.  
  514.   What are little boys made of, made of?
  515.   What are little boys made of?
  516.   Snips and snails, and puppy-dogs' tails;
  517.   And that's what little boys are made of, made of.
  518.  
  519.   What are little girls made of, made of?
  520.   What are little girls made of?
  521.   Sugar and spice, and all that's nice;
  522.   And that's what little girls are made of, made of.
  523.  
  524.        *       *       *       *       *
  525.  
  526.   A farmer went trotting
  527.     Upon his gray mare;
  528.   Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
  529.   With his daughter behind him,
  530.     So rosy and fair;
  531.   Lumpety, lumpety, lump!
  532.  
  533.   A raven cried "Croak";
  534.     And they all tumbled down;
  535.   Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
  536.   The mare broke her knees,
  537.     And the farmer his crown;
  538.   Lumpety, lumpety, lump.
  539.  
  540.   The mischievous raven
  541.     Flew laughing away;
  542.   Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
  543.   And vowed he would serve them
  544.     The same the next day;
  545.   Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
  546.  
  547.        *       *       *       *       *
  548.  
  549.   This is the way the ladies ride--
  550.   Saddle-a-side, saddle-a-side!
  551.  
  552.   This is the way the gentlemen ride--
  553.   Sitting astride, sitting astride!
  554.  
  555.   This is the way the grandmothers ride--
  556.   Bundled and tied, bundled and tied!
  557.  
  558.   This is the way the babykins ride--
  559.   Snuggled inside, snuggled inside!
  560.  
  561.        *       *       *       *       *
  562.  
  563.  
  564. WHAT DOES LITTLE BIRDIE SAY?
  565.  
  566.   What does little birdie say,
  567.   In her nest at peep of day?
  568.     "Let me fly," says little birdie,
  569.   "Mother, let me fly away."
  570.  
  571.   Birdie, rest a little longer,
  572.   Till the little wings are stronger.
  573.   So she rests a little longer,
  574.     Then she flies away.
  575.  
  576.   What does little baby say,
  577.   In her bed at peep of day?
  578.     Baby says, like little birdie,
  579.   "Let me rise and fly away."
  580.  
  581.   Baby, sleep a little longer,
  582.   Till the little limbs are stronger.
  583.   If she sleeps a little longer,
  584.     Baby, too, shall fly away.
  585.  
  586. ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON
  587.  
  588.        *       *       *       *       *
  589.  
  590.  
  591. GOOD NIGHT
  592.  
  593.   Little baby, lay your head
  594.   On your pretty cradle-bed;
  595.   Shut your eye-peeps, now the day
  596.   And the light are gone away;
  597.   All the clothes are tucked in tight;
  598.   Little baby dear, good night.
  599.  
  600.   Yes, my darling, well I know
  601.   How the bitter wind doth blow;
  602.   And the winter's snow and rain
  603.   Patter on the window-pane:
  604.   But they cannot come in here,
  605.   To my little baby dear;
  606.  
  607.   For the window shutteth fast,
  608.   Till the stormy night is past;
  609.   And the curtains warm are spread
  610.   Round about her cradle-bed:
  611.   So till morning shineth bright,
  612.   Little baby dear, good night.
  613.  
  614. JANE TAYLOR
  615.  
  616.        *       *       *       *       *
  617.  
  618.  
  619. SWEET AND LOW
  620.  
  621.   Sweet and low, sweet and low,
  622.     Wind of the western sea,
  623.   Low, low, breathe and blow,
  624.     Wind of the western sea!
  625.   Over the rolling waters go,
  626.   Come from the dying moon, and blow,
  627.     Blow him again to me:
  628.   While my little one, while my pretty one, sleeps.
  629.  
  630.   Sleep and rest, sleep and rest,
  631.     Father will come to thee soon;
  632.   Rest, rest, on mother's breast,
  633.     Father will come to thee soon;
  634.   Father will come to his babe in the nest,
  635.   Silver sails all out of the west
  636.     Under the silver moon:
  637.   Sleep, my little one, sleep, my pretty one, sleep.
  638.  
  639. ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON
  640.  
  641.        *       *       *       *       *
  642.  
  643.  
  644. BABY-LAND
  645.  
  646.   Which is the way to Baby-Land?
  647.     Any one can tell;
  648.       Up one flight,
  649.       To your right;
  650.     Please to ring the bell.
  651.  
  652.   What can you see in Baby-Land?
  653.     Little folks in white,
  654.       Downy heads,
  655.       Cradle-beds,
  656.     Faces pure and bright.
  657.  
  658.   What do they do in Baby-Land?
  659.     Dream and wake and play,
  660.       Laugh and crow,
  661.       Shout and grow,
  662.     Jolly times have they.
  663.  
  664.   What do they say in Baby-Land?
  665.     Why, the oddest things;
  666.       Might as well
  667.       Try to tell
  668.     What a birdie sings.
  669.  
  670.   Who is the Queen of Baby-Land?
  671.     Mother kind and sweet;
  672.       And her love,
  673.       Born above,
  674.     Guides the little feet.
  675.  
  676. GEORGE COOPER
  677.  
  678.        *       *       *       *       *
  679.  
  680.   Old Mother Hubbard, she went to the cupboard,
  681.     To get her poor dog a bone.
  682.   When she got there, the cupboard was bare,
  683.     And so the poor dog had none.
  684.  
  685.   She went to the baker's to buy him some bread,
  686.   But when she came back the poor dog was dead.
  687.  
  688.   She went to the undertaker's to buy him a coffin,
  689.   And when she came back the dog was laughing.
  690.  
  691.   She went to the draper's to buy him some linen,
  692.   And when she came back the good dog was spinning.
  693.  
  694.   She went to the hosier's to buy him some hose,
  695.   And when she came back he was dressed in his clothes.
  696.  
  697.   The dame made a curtsy, the dog made a bow,
  698.   The dame said "your servant," the dog said "Bow-wow."
  699.  
  700.   She went to the hatter's to buy him a hat,
  701.   And when she came back he was feeding the cat.
  702.  
  703.   She went to the tailor's to buy him a coat,
  704.   And when she came back he was riding the goat.
  705.  
  706.   She went to the barber's to buy him a wig,
  707.   And when she came back he was dancing a jig.
  708.  
  709.   She went to the butcher's to get him some tripe,
  710.   And when she came back he was smoking a pipe.
  711.  
  712.   She went to the fish-shop to buy him some fish,
  713.   And when she came back he was washing the dish.
  714.  
  715.   She went to the tavern for white wine and red,
  716.   And when she came back the dog stood on his head.
  717.  
  718.        *       *       *       *       *
  719.  
  720.   As I was going to St. Ives
  721.   I met a man with seven wives;
  722.   Every wife had seven sacks,
  723.   Every sack had seven cats,
  724.   Every cat had seven kits.
  725.   Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
  726.   How many were going to St. Ives?
  727.  
  728.        *       *       *       *       *
  729.  
  730.  
  731. POLLY
  732.  
  733.   Brown eyes, straight nose;
  734.   Dirt pies, rumpled clothes.
  735.  
  736.   Torn books, spoilt toys:
  737.   Arch looks, unlike a boy's;
  738.  
  739.   Little rages, obvious arts;
  740.   (Three her age is), cakes, tarts;
  741.  
  742.   Falling down off chairs;
  743.   Breaking crown down stairs;
  744.  
  745.   Catching flies on the pane;
  746.   Deep sighs--cause not plain;
  747.  
  748.   Bribing you with kisses
  749.   For a few farthing blisses.
  750.  
  751.   Wide-a-wake; as you hear,
  752.   "Mercy's sake, quiet, dear!"
  753.  
  754.   New shoes, new frock;
  755.   Vague views of what's o'clock
  756.  
  757.   When it's time to go to bed,
  758.   And scorn sublime for what is said
  759.  
  760.   Folded hands, saying prayers,
  761.   Understands not nor cares--
  762.  
  763.   Thinks it odd, smiles away;
  764.   Yet may God hear her pray!
  765.  
  766.   Bed gown white, kiss Dolly;
  767.   Good night!--that's Polly,
  768.  
  769.   Fast asleep, as you see,
  770.   Heaven keep my girl for me!
  771.  
  772. WILLIAM BRIGHTY RANDS
  773.  
  774.        *       *       *       *       *
  775.  
  776.  
  777. CRADLE HYMN
  778.  
  779.   Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber;
  780.     Holy angels guard thy bed;
  781.   Heavenly blessings without number
  782.     Gently falling on thy head.
  783.  
  784.   Sleep, my babe, thy food and raiment,
  785.     House and home, thy friends provide;
  786.   All without thy care, or payment,
  787.     All thy wants are well supplied.
  788.  
  789.   How much better thou'rt attended
  790.     Than the Son of God could be,
  791.   When from heaven He descended,
  792.     And became a child like thee!
  793.  
  794.   Soft and easy is thy cradle;
  795.     Coarse and hard thy Saviour lay,
  796.   When His birthplace was a stable,
  797.     And His softest bed was hay.
  798.  
  799.   See the kindly shepherds round him,
  800.     Telling wonders from the sky!
  801.   When they sought Him, there they found Him,
  802.     With his Virgin-Mother by.
  803.  
  804.   See the lovely babe a-dressing;
  805.     Lovely infant, how He smiled!
  806.   When He wept, the mother's blessing
  807.     Soothed and hushed the holy child.
  808.  
  809.   Lo, He slumbers in His manger,
  810.     Where the honest oxen fed;
  811.   --Peace, my darling! here's no danger!
  812.     Here's no ox a-near thy bed!
  813.  
  814.   Mayst thou live to know and fear Him,
  815.     Trust and love Him all thy days;
  816.   Then go dwell forever near Him,
  817.     See His face, and sing His praise!
  818.  
  819.   I could give thee thousand kisses,
  820.     Hoping what I most desire;
  821.   Not a mother's fondest wishes
  822.     Can to greater joys aspire.
  823.  
  824. ISAAC WATTS
  825.  
  826.        *       *       *       *       *
  827.  
  828.  
  829. I LIKE LITTLE PUSSY
  830.  
  831.   I like little Pussy,
  832.     Her coat is so warm;
  833.   And if I don't hurt her
  834.     She'll do me no harm.
  835.   So I'll not pull her tail,
  836.     Nor drive her away,
  837.   But Pussy and I
  838.     Very gently will play;
  839.   She shall sit by my side,
  840.     And I'll give her some food;
  841.   And she'll love me because
  842.     I am gentle and good.
  843.  
  844.   I'll pat little Pussy,
  845.     And then she will purr,
  846.   And thus show her thanks
  847.     For my kindness to her;
  848.   I'll not pinch her ears,
  849.     Nor tread on her paw,
  850.   Lest I should provoke her
  851.     To use her sharp claw;
  852.   I never will vex her,
  853.     Nor make her displeased,
  854.   For Pussy can't bear
  855.     To be worried or teased.
  856.  
  857. JANE TAYLOR
  858.  
  859.        *       *       *       *       *
  860.  
  861.  
  862. THE GRAVEL PATH
  863.  
  864.     Baby mustn't frown,
  865.     When she tumbles down;
  866.   If the wind should change--Ah me,
  867.   What a face her face would be!
  868.  
  869.     Rub away the dirt,
  870.     Say she wasn't hurt;
  871.   What a world 'twould be--O my,
  872.   If all who fell began to cry!
  873.  
  874. LAURENCE ALMA TADEMA
  875.  
  876.        *       *       *       *       *
  877.  
  878.   Little Robin Redbreast sat upon a tree,
  879.   Up went pussy-cat, and down went he;
  880.   Down came pussy-cat, and away Robin ran;
  881.   Said little Robin Redbreast, "Catch me if you can."
  882.  
  883.   Little Robin Redbreast jumped upon a wall,
  884.   Pussy-cat jumped after him, and almost got a fall;
  885.   Little Robin chirped and sang, and what did pussy say?
  886.   Pussy-cat said naught but "Mew," and Robin flew away.
  887.  
  888.        *       *       *       *       *
  889.  
  890.  
  891. SLEEP, MY TREASURE
  892.  
  893.     Sleep, sleep, my treasure,
  894.     The long day's pleasure
  895.   Has tired the birds, to their nests they creep;
  896.     The garden still is
  897.     Alight with lilies,
  898.   But all the daisies are fast asleep.
  899.  
  900.     Sleep, sleep, my darling,
  901.     Dawn wakes the starling,
  902.   The sparrow stirs when he sees day break;
  903.     But all the meadow
  904.     Is wrapped in shadow,
  905.   And you must sleep till the daisies wake!
  906.  
  907. E. NESBIT
  908.  
  909.        *       *       *       *       *
  910.  
  911.  
  912. LULLABY OF AN INFANT CHIEF
  913.  
  914.   Oh, hush thee, my babie, thy sire was a knight,
  915.   Thy mother a lady, both lovely and bright;
  916.   The woods and the glens from the tower which we see,
  917.   They all are belonging, dear babie, to thee.
  918.  
  919.   Oh, fear not the bugle, though loudly it blows,
  920.   It calls but the warders that guard thy repose;
  921.   Their bows would be bended, their blades would be red,
  922.   Ere the step of a foeman draws near to thy bed.
  923.  
  924.   Oh, hush thee, my babie, the time will soon come,
  925.   When thy sleep shall be broken by trumpet and drum;
  926.   Then hush thee, my darling, take rest while you may,
  927.   For strife comes with manhood, and waking with day.
  928.  
  929. SIR WALTER SCOTT
  930.  
  931.        *       *       *       *       *
  932.  
  933.  
  934. THE ORPHAN'S SONG
  935.  
  936.   I had a little bird,
  937.     I took it from the nest;
  938.   I prest it and blest it,
  939.     And nurst it in my breast.
  940.  
  941.   I set it on the ground,
  942.   Danced round and round,
  943.   And sang about it so cheerly,
  944.     With "Hey, my little bird,
  945.     And ho! my little bird,
  946.   And oh! but I love thee dearly!"
  947.  
  948.   I make a little feast
  949.     Of food soft and sweet,
  950.   I hold it in my breast,
  951.     And coax it to eat;
  952.  
  953.   I pit, and I pat,
  954.   I call this and that,
  955.   And I sing about so cheerly,
  956.     With "Hey, my little bird,
  957.     And ho! my little bird,
  958.   And oh! but I love thee dearly!"
  959.  
  960. SYDNEY DOBELL
  961.  
  962.        *       *       *       *       *
  963.  
  964.  
  965. THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF COCK ROBIN
  966.  
  967.   Who killed Cock Robin?
  968.     "I," said the Sparrow,
  969.     "With my bow and arrow,
  970.   I killed Cock Robin."
  971.  
  972.   Who saw him die?
  973.     "I," said the Fly,
  974.     "With my little eye,
  975.   I saw him die."
  976.  
  977.   Who caught his blood?
  978.     "I," said the Fish,
  979.     "With my little dish,
  980.   I caught his blood."
  981.  
  982.   Who'll make his shroud?
  983.     "I," said the Beetle,
  984.     "With my thread and needle,
  985.   I'll make his shroud."
  986.  
  987.   Who'll bear the torch?
  988.     "I," said the Linnet,
  989.     "I'll come in a minute,
  990.   I'll bear the torch."
  991.  
  992.   Who'll be the clerk?
  993.     "I," said the Lark,
  994.     "I'll say Amen in the dark;
  995.   I'll be the clerk."
  996.  
  997.   Who'll dig his grave?
  998.     "I," said the Owl,
  999.     "With my spade and trowel,
  1000.   I'll dig his grave."
  1001.  
  1002.   Who'll be the parson?
  1003.     "I," said the Rook,
  1004.     "With my little book,
  1005.   I'll be the parson."
  1006.  
  1007.   Who'll be chief mourner?
  1008.     "I," said the Dove,
  1009.     "I mourn for my love;
  1010.   I'll be chief mourner."
  1011.  
  1012.   Who'll sing his dirge?
  1013.     "I," said the Thrush,
  1014.     "As I sing in a bush,
  1015.   I'll sing his dirge."
  1016.  
  1017.        *       *       *       *       *
  1018.  
  1019.  
  1020. DO YOU KNOW HOW MANY STARS?
  1021.  
  1022.   Do you know how many stars
  1023.   There are shining in the skies?
  1024.   Do you know how many clouds
  1025.   Ev'ry day go floating by?
  1026.   God in heaven has counted all,
  1027.   He would miss one should it fall.
  1028.  
  1029.   Do you know how many children
  1030.   Go to little beds at night,
  1031.   And without a care or sorrow,
  1032.   Wake up in the morning light?
  1033.   God in heaven each name can tell,
  1034.   Loves you, too, and loves you well.
  1035.  
  1036.        *       *       *       *       *
  1037.  
  1038.  
  1039. WHERE DO ALL THE DAISIES GO?
  1040.  
  1041.   Where do all the daisies go?
  1042.       I know, I know!
  1043.   Underneath the snow they creep,
  1044.   Nod their little heads and sleep,
  1045.   In the springtime out they peep;
  1046.       That is where they go!
  1047.  
  1048.   Where do all the birdies go?
  1049.       I know, I know!
  1050.   Far away from winter snow
  1051.   To the fair, warm South they go;
  1052.   There they stay till daisies blow,
  1053.       That is where they go!
  1054.  
  1055.   Where do all the babies go?
  1056.       I know, I know!
  1057.   In the glancing firelight warm,
  1058.   Safely sheltered from all harm,
  1059.   Soft they lie on mother's arm,
  1060.       That is where they go!
  1061.  
  1062. UNKNOWN
  1063.  
  1064.        *       *       *       *       *
  1065.  
  1066.   Cock crows in the morn,
  1067.     To tell us to rise,
  1068.   And he who lies late
  1069.     Will never be wise.
  1070.   For early to bed,
  1071.     And early to rise,
  1072.   Is the way to be healthy
  1073.     And wealthy and wise.
  1074.  
  1075.        *       *       *       *       *
  1076.  
  1077.  
  1078. THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT
  1079.  
  1080.   This is the house that Jack built.
  1081.  
  1082.   This is the malt
  1083.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1084.  
  1085.   This is the rat
  1086.   That ate the malt
  1087.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1088.  
  1089.   This is the cat,
  1090.   That killed the rat,
  1091.   That ate the malt
  1092.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1093.  
  1094.   This is the dog,
  1095.   That worried the cat,
  1096.   That killed the rat,
  1097.   That ate the malt
  1098.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1099.  
  1100.   This is the cow with the crumpled horn
  1101.   That tossed the dog,
  1102.   That worried the cat,
  1103.   That killed the rat,
  1104.   That ate the malt
  1105.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1106.  
  1107.   This is the maiden all forlorn,
  1108.   That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
  1109.   That tossed the dog,
  1110.   That worried the cat,
  1111.   That killed the rat,
  1112.   That ate the malt
  1113.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1114.  
  1115.   This is the man all tattered and torn,
  1116.   That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
  1117.   That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
  1118.   That tossed the dog,
  1119.   That worried the cat,
  1120.   That killed the rat,
  1121.   That ate the malt
  1122.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1123.  
  1124.   This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
  1125.   That married the man all tattered and torn,
  1126.   That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
  1127.   That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
  1128.   That tossed the dog,
  1129.   That worried the cat,
  1130.   That killed the rat,
  1131.   That ate the malt
  1132.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1133.  
  1134.   This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
  1135.   That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
  1136.   That married the man all tattered and torn,
  1137.   That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
  1138.   That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
  1139.   That tossed the dog,
  1140.   That worried the cat,
  1141.   That killed the rat,
  1142.   That ate the malt
  1143.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
  1144.  
  1145.   This is the farmer sowing his corn,
  1146.   That kept the cock that crowed in the morn,
  1147.   That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
  1148.   That married the man all tattered and torn,
  1149.   That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
  1150.   That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
  1151.   That tossed the dog,
  1152.   That worried the cat,
  1153.   That killed the rat,
  1154.   That ate the malt
  1155.   That lay in the house that Jack built.
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