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  1. Afternoon story time
  2.  
  3. Kent, Ruby, and Me: How I test-drove my Career - Davis Frank @dwfrank (pivotal labs, in charge of official open-source efforts)
  4.  
  5.   - Career History
  6.    - Quit in 2006
  7.     - Faced w/ management job decisions (couple of lousy interviews)
  8.     - Took a bit of a break
  9.   - Met Kent Beck (extreme programming white book) nut house in Palo Alto -- did not drink MGD
  10.     - New First Principles
  11.       - Dave suggested Ruby on Rails (summer '06) - Pickaxe, Agile Dev w/ Rails
  12.       - This is why Ruby exists -- to make us happy - and speaker was happy again
  13.     - Spent a lot of time camped out in Pete's next to an Apple store
  14.       - Wrote a lot of docs for the Rails wiki (cygwin -- eclipse and windows for rails dev)
  15.     - [YES WE CAN]
  16.       - avoid not coding... bills called and revenue was needed
  17.     - Now an Associate Director at Pivotal Labs
  18.       - Help pivots w/ projects in an educational role
  19.     - Pivotal wrote Jasmine (RSpec for JavaScript)
  20.       - Speaker hasn't given up on Ruby
  21.     - Wrote Keydown and Anchorman
  22.     - Think about your Career in the same way you think about your code
  23.       - Don't be afraid to throw it all away
  24.   - Thanks [Dave, Kent and Matz]
  25.   - RailsConf '08: an epilogue
  26.     - Kent Beck ( mistook him for another crazy guy but remembered he was cool )
  27.  
  28. Davy Stevenson
  29.  
  30. [No slides]
  31. - Not her legal name -- and no you won't know it
  32. - Team Building
  33.   - 4 years ago.. joined Elemental Technologies. Elemental do video transcoding for comcast, HBO, etc.
  34.     - Most of the Engineers there are working in C/C++
  35.     - Using Rails and a Web Framework to produce a UI and a REST API w/ automation made their products available
  36.       - speaker was a team of one originally (for a few years)
  37.     - Started to hire additional people
  38.       - Speaker moved into a lead position
  39.     - Had to double team size in 6 months
  40.       - diversity in knowledge base w/ a wide variety of skill levels
  41.     - Spent a lot of time on outreach
  42.       - Local User Groups
  43.     - Interviewing
  44.       - combating natural bias toward comparison... if you do not you'll have an homogeneous team
  45.       - a lot of people with a lot of personalities
  46.         - dealing w/ conflicts
  47.         - important for everyone within a team to create an environment for everyone to ask questions
  48.     - After 6 months
  49.       - 33% female, unfortunately within Portland it's a sea of white faces
  50.       - Doughnut Fridays -- other teams expressed envy of the interaction within the team
  51.       - information transfer was greatly increased because people were able to ask questions in a safe environment and perspectives were different so it brought in a lot of unique solutions
  52.     - The Ruby Community is a large team -- we need to be friendly, welcoming and open
  53.  
  54. Jesse Toth
  55.  
  56. [No Slides]
  57. Curiosity
  58. - As developers, curiosity is one of our greatest assets
  59. - Thought College would be a space where one could go and discover -- to keep her curiosity
  60.   - Majored in Computer Science
  61.   - When speaker got there was dissatisfied with the state of courses -- prerequisites and other things
  62. - Class w/ large reading list (everything speaker ever wanted to read)
  63.   - Spent a lot of time in office hours w/ professor
  64.     - advisor says you know that's because you don't belong here you should be at Berkeley
  65. - First semester was terrible (grades tanked)
  66.   - speaker wasn't interested in the things
  67.   - intimidated by classmates -- constantly comparing
  68. - Compilers
  69.   - First lecture, how compilers worked and that we would be building a full compiler
  70.   - Fascinated
  71. - Each semester after that speaker found a course that did the same thing for her
  72. - Went to work as a Rails consultant
  73.   - doing the consulting thing let her see a lot of projects
  74.   - wanted to do a deeper dive after some time
  75. - Tried a few start-ups
  76. - Met some people from Github
  77.   - Hired
  78.   - Did some amazing work in the first few weeks
  79.   - Started comparing herself to co-workers and got unhappy, work quality declined
  80.   - Started a new project
  81.     - got interested
  82.     - coded the whole week and solve a long standing problem
  83.     - got happy again
  84.   - Stopped and reflected
  85.     - curiosity was the root of it
  86.     - fear of showing ignorance or not measuring up replaced curiosity
  87.   - Looked around
  88.     - The reason they did the open source projects they did was because they were curious
  89. - Stay Curious
  90.   - If you weren't curious in the first place, go find something that makes you curious
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