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dhamma of the buddha--unconditional equanimity & benevolence

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  1.  
  2. First, the buddha Gotama did not call himself the buddha, but the Tathagata.
  3. >"one who has thus gone" (tathā-gata) or "one who has thus come" (tathā-āgata).
  4. Second, the buddha did not teach buddhism, but the dhamma [or dharma] of the Tathagata.
  5. [the general word dhamma means nature or proper nature of a phenomenon or something or somebody, but since the dhamma of the Tathagata applies to everything, it is the nature everything and thus just ''dhamma'']
  6.  
  7. What matters in buddhism is to understand the message of the Tathagata, that is to say the dhamma.
  8.  
  9. >When one has freed the mind, the gods cannot trace him, even though they think: ‘This is the consciousness attached to the Tathagata.’ And why? It is because the Tathagata is untraceable. Although I say this, there are some monks and brahmins who misrepresent me falsely, contrary to fact, saying: ‘The monk Gotama is an annihilationist because he teaches the cutting off, the destruction, the disappearance of the existing entity.’ But this is exactly what I do not teach. Both now and in the past, I simply teach suffering and the overcoming of suffering.
  10. -- M.I,140
  11.  
  12.  
  13. >In what way could one say: ‘The monk Gotama is an annihilationist, he teaches the doctrine of annihilation,’ and be speaking correctly? I teach the annihilation of greed, hatred and delusion. I proclaim the annihilation of evil unskilled states. It is in this way that one could say: ‘The monk Gotama is an annihilationist, he teaches the doctrine of annihilation,’ and be speaking correctly.
  14. -- A.IV,183
  15.  
  16.  
  17.  
  18. >There are two things that burn the conscience. What two? Say a person has done immoral acts of body, speech or mind, or has failed to do virtuous acts of the body, speech or mind. When he thinks of this he burns with remorse.
  19. -- A.I,49
  20.  
  21.  
  22.  
  23. To understand the dhamma is nothing else than to understand the dependant origination of conditioned phenomena that we perceive through our six senses [touch, sight, hearing, smell, mind, taste] from which we are led to believe in a self, but this self is nothing but a bundle of five aggregates present in every perception of a conditioned phenomenon, aggregates whose ignorance brings us nothing but dukkha, that is to say, discomfort, unsatisfaction, uncertainty, suffering.
  24. The state of nibbana [or nirvana] nor making good or bad kamma are not the goal of a student of the dhamma.
  25. The state of nibbana and making good kamma follows instantly from the comprehension of the dhamma.
  26. What matters is the understanding of five aggregates.
  27. How to understand them ?
  28.  
  29.  
  30. >When walking, he is aware: ‘I am walking,’ or when he is standing still, he is aware: ‘I am standing still,’ or when he is sitting down, he is aware: ‘I am sitting down,’ or when he is lying down, he is aware: ‘I am lying down.’ So however his body is disposed, he is aware that it is like that. Again, when he is going or coming, he acts in a clearly conscious way; when he is looking in front or behind, when he has bent or stretched out his arm, when he is carrying his cloak, robe and bowl, he is one who acts in a clearly conscious way. When he is eating, drinking, chewing and tasting, when he is going to the toilet, when he is walking, standing, sitting, asleep or awake, talking or silent, he is one who acts in a clearly conscious way. While he is in this way, diligent, ardent, self-resolute, those memories and plans that are worldly are got rid of, and so by itself the mind is inwardly settled, calmed, focused and concentrated. In this way does one develop mindfulness of the body.
  31. >--- M.III,89
  32.  
  33.  
  34. >The Lord said to the monks: “Body is not self. If it were, it would not be liable to affliction, and one could say: ‘Let my body be like this. Let not my body be like that.’ But since the body is not the self, it is liable to affliction, and one cannot say: ‘Let my body be like this. Let not my body be like that.’ And it is the same with feeling, perception, mental constructs and consciousness. What do you think? Is body permanent or impermanent?”
  35. >“Impermanent, sir.”
  36. >“Now, is what is impermanent painful or pleasant?”
  37. >“Painful, sir.”
  38. >“Now, is it fit to regard what is impermanent and painful like this: ‘This is mine, this is I, this is my self?’ ”
  39. >“No, sir.”
  40. >“And it is the same with feeling, perception, mental constructs and consciousness. So, any kind of body, feeling, perception, mental constructs or consciousness, whether past, present or future, whether gross or subtle, whether internal or external, whether inferior or superior, whether far or near, must with right understanding be regarded thus: ‘This is not mine, this is not I, this is not my self.’ When a noble disciple has heard this and sees this, he becomes detached from body, feeling, perception, mental constructs and consciousness. Being detached, passions fade, with the fading of passions he is free, and when he is free he knows he is free. He knows: ‘Birth is ended, the holy life has been lived, what has had to be done is done, there is no more of this.’ ”
  41. -- S.III,66
  42.  
  43.  
  44. ============direct detailed explanation on vipassana and the jhanas==============
  45. >/!\ SWIFT vipassana WITH A VIDEO/!\
  46. These instructions are drawn from the vipassana traditions of Mahasi Sayadaw and Chao Khun Bhavanapirama Thera.
  47. http://vipassanadhura.com/howto.htm
  48. with video of a duration of 50 minutes
  49. http://vipassanadhura.com/mindfulness.html
  50.  
  51.  
  52. >are the jhanas required for stream-entry ?
  53. The Jhānas and the Lay Disciple According to the Pāli Suttas, Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi
  54. http://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha267.htm
  55. ==================================================================================
  56.  
  57.  
  58. There are two aspects of the study
  59. >meditation on our selves [for beginners]
  60. >meditation on the (external) world [for beginners]
  61. >meditation on suttas [almost mandatory]: in order to know what to do, when to do it
  62. the following two are the most important things to do to be called a student of the dharma:
  63. >moral behaviours towards others and ourselves [crucial] : benevolence plus equanimity [no avidity, nor aversion] towards everything that happens to us and others.
  64. Both towards ourself and others, both every time, both every where.
  65. /!\Equanimity is not apathy /!\.
  66. >the morality is the crucial part.
  67. If you manage to make it intuitive, so that you behave only through equanimity as well as through benevolence [benevolence which turns into the action that is the charity], you will make it easier for the last step:
  68. >contemplation [crucial]: tranquillity and insight bringing serenity
  69. Of course, most people do not come from a moral doctrine which the dhammic one; this is why they struggle once they attempt to contemplate.
  70.  
  71.  
  72. The humanity is the worst species in terms of hedonism: our pleasures stem from hard work whereas our jouissances are nothing but fleeting.
  73. Even worse, the more we satisfy our desires, the more we see them diminishing, making us understand that they are phony, the less we need to satisfy them for a while.
  74. Even worse than the hard work, even worse than the evanescence is the lassitude from our pleasures.
  75. The more we enjoy an activity, the less it remains to enjoy: we become jaded and, even with all the wealth in the world to fight this lassitude thanks to a diversity of entertainment, we do not escape the boredom, in other words, dukkha persists.
  76. The tragedy of the pleasure is that we do not know when we experience it WHEN WE EXPERIENCE IT, since it seems that the intensity of the pleasure is inversely proportional to its duration.
  77. If, by some miracle, we are aware of our (mild) pleasure, we may then worry of its disappearance.
  78.  
  79.  
  80.  
  81. The happiness is very simply turned into an equation:
  82. >our pleasing perceptions + knowledge that they are pleasing sensations DURING the pleasing sensations + identification of we with these pleasing perceptions = happiness = to be happy + to know that we are happy WHEN WE ARE HAPPY [instead of knowing that we WERE happy]
  83. There are then two options to establish firmly the happiness:
  84. -to continue to identify ourself with the senses, from which we must pursue the pleasures, the most lasting and intense as we can, given our means; and to find a method to enjoy the sensations WHILE we experience pleasure
  85. -to stop identifying, through our senses, with our perceptions, with the pains but equally with the pleasures since they lead to pains just as pain itself
  86.  
  87.  
  88. the logic is thus : once we experience superficially dukkha, inwards and outwards with respect to our being in the form of body/mind, we understand that dukkha is not to be sought IF we want a robust happiness [more robust than the pleasures from the hedonism].
  89. This leads us to hear about the dhamma, then to read a bit of suttas.
  90. Once we learn the dhamma superficially, we want to put an end to dukkha.
  91. To put an end to dukkha is to understand the five aggregates.
  92. This superficial right view, this superficial insight [vipassana] at the beginning brings tranquillity [samatha] then, samatha permits the concentration [samadhi] which permits an observation pertaining to the development of the full insight [vipassana].
  93. the Vipassana permits to understand what goes on inside of us and furthers the tranquillity [samatha], tranquillity [samatha] which betters the concentration [samadhi], and the virtuous cycle is formed.
  94. The samadhi, samatha, vipassana will make the dhammic morality intuitive, natural.
  95. We cannot have samadhi without vipassana, we cannot have vipassana without samadhi [beginning with samatha].
  96.  
  97.  
  98.  
  99. >===ASIDE ON CONTEMPLATION===
  100. There is not a right posture to contemplate.
  101. The goal is to be equanim and benevolent irrespective of our posture, irrespective of the environment.
  102. >AFTER EACH CESSION OF CONTEMPLATION, WE MUST BE ABLE TO UNDERSTAND WHAT HAPPENED: THAT SUCH PERCEPTIONS WERE PRESENT, THAT SUCH PERCEPTIONS WERE NOT PRESENT; THAT WE LIKED THIS, THAT DID NOT LIKE THAT; THAT WE THINK SUCH PERCEPTIONS ARE GROSS AND CAN BE DITCHED TO REACH, NEXT TIME, A MORE PROFOUND APPEASEMENT.
  103. >/!\IF A PLEASING SENSATION APPEARS IN WATCHING THE BREATH FOR INSTANCE, THIS PLEASING SENSATION MUST BECOME THE OBJECT OF Meditation./!\
  104. There are four main postures in our daily life: the lying, the sitting, the standing up, the walking.
  105. >CONTEMPLATION MUST BE DONE IN EVERY POSITION.
  106. Many teachers and practitioners believe that we must not move during a session of contemplation: they are right and wrong.
  107. Since the goal of the contemplation is to establish the ''mindfulness'' [SATI], that is to say the equanimity+benevolence towards our perceptions typically through the analysis of the perceptions which permits the dissolution of the self, we can naturally move in every session of contemplation AS LONG AS WE ESTABLISH SATI DURING THE DISPLACEMENT.
  108.  
  109. The sitting posture, especially the lotus position is the most stable but it is not necessary; A relax position is not necessary for any buddha, but for the beginner, in order for him to study his perceptions through the six senses, he must be at ease to clear his mind as much as possible.
  110.  
  111.  
  112. Indeed, let us discuss a bit about the pain as well as the suffering: the pain is sensation, whereas the suffering is the identification, by our mind, of ourself at the pain.
  113. The pain is the best gift that we have: the pain is present constantly, we are strongly averse too it, to the point of a few people managing to turn a few of their pains into pleasures, and the pain is acute.
  114. There exist two genres of pains: the contemplative pain from sitting more than a few dozens of minutes; the chronic pain from our daily life.
  115. The purpose of the dhamma being the analysis of EVERY perception without aversion nor avidity, we understand that the dhamma does not focus on pain per se.
  116. Rather, our life being far more about pain than pleasure, our pain being far more present and lasting than our pleasures, we must analyse the pain far more often than the pleasures.
  117. It is as if we try to escape ourself (in believing what is) outwards in seeking something to complete us.
  118. If we were good hedonists, none of these dissatisfactions would occur and we could carry the analysis of our perceptions through the pleasures.
  119.  
  120.  
  121. The contemplative pains appear after a long sessions of contemplations and are probably contingent since the contemplation must be performed in every posture of our daily life.
  122. At the end, We must not attach ourself to one posture in order to contemplate; therefore, the best manner to avoid attaching ourself remains to do:
  123. -lying contemplation, typically for one hour, in a position different from the one which enjoy to drift into sleep
  124. -sitting contemplation, typically for one hour
  125. -standing contemplation, typically for one hour
  126. -walking contemplation, typically for one hour, in the position zhan zhuang where the Knees are slightly bent [NEVER LOCK THE BODY]
  127.  
  128. >IN EVERY POSTURE THE BACK MUST BE STRAIGHT. NEVER EVER MUST WE BENT OUR BACK. NEVER EVER HURT THE BACK.
  129.  
  130. The best manner to begin the contemplation is the standing and walking postures, then to sit and lay, then to stand or walk again and to repeat this as a cycle.
  131. For beginners, the standing contemplation is suited in the static position of the zhan zhuang and to analyse the sensations, typically from the contact of feet with the ground.
  132.  
  133.  
  134. A warning: many people now do either samatha or vipassana, and not the other one.
  135. >===WE CAN DO TWO THINGS WHEN WE CONTEMPLATE AN OBJECT: WE CAN SEEK A UNIFICATION OF THE OBJECT WITH YOUR MIND, OR WE CAN TRY TO DISSOCIATE OURSELF FROM THE OBJECT.===
  136. Each one fo the two possibility can be done purely [without the other], but the dissociation DURING the unifaction brings the tranquillity [samatha] and the concentration [samadhi] which will allow you to contemplate the three characteristics of every conditioned phenomenon, through the analysis of them by us, which will be the understanding by us of the five aggregates: the impersonality, the impermanence and the dissatisfaction.
  137.  
  138. In occident, people want to ''meditate'' that is to say to contemplate as much as possible, without the morality, since they come from a hedonist doctrine that they love and have much difficulty to abandon.
  139. They prefer the vipassana meditation because they think that it is quicker.
  140. In orient, people want to be moral, and the westerners claim that the oriental is a sheep loving to be told what to do.
  141. Now with the spread of hedonist through the atom that is the individual, the oriental begins to refuse to follow blindly the morality, which makes the westerners happy.
  142. Too few orientals go into contemplation.
  143.  
  144.  
  145. The access to the contemplation can be hindered by at least one of the five hindrances below:
  146. >The five hindrances are:
  147. >Sensory desire (kāmacchanda): the particular type of wanting that seeks for happiness through the five senses of sight, sound, smell, taste and physical feeling.
  148. >Ill-will (vyāpāda; also spelled byāpāda): all kinds of thought related to wanting to reject, feelings of hostility, resentment, hatred and bitterness.
  149. >Sloth-torpor (thīna-middha): heaviness of body and dullness of mind which drag one down into disabling inertia and thick depression.
  150. >Restlessness-worry (uddhacca-kukkucca): the inability to calm the mind.
  151. >Doubt (vicikicchā): lack of conviction or trust.
  152.  
  153.  
  154. >===The Five Hindrances (Nivarana) Ajahn Brahmavamso===
  155. http://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebmed051.htm
  156. >The major obstacles to successful meditation and liberating insight take the form of one or more of the Five Hindrances. The whole practice leading to Enlightenment can be well expressed as the effort to overcome the Five Hindrances, at first suppressing them temporarily in order to experience Jhana and Insight, and then overcoming them permanently through the full development of the Noble Eightfold Path.
  157. >Any problem which arises in meditation will be one of these Five Hindrances, or a combination. So, if one experiences any difficulty, use the scheme of the Five Hindrances as a 'check list' to identify the main problem. Then you will know the appropriate remedy, apply it carefully, and go beyond the obstacle into deeper meditation.
  158. >When the Five Hindrances are fully overcome, there is no barrier between the meditator and the bliss of Jhana. Therefore, the certain test that these Five Hindrances are really overcome is the ability to access Jhana.
  159.  
  160.  
  161. ===what are the jhanas ?===
  162. >There are the four "lower" jhanas ("absorptions") associated with the World of Form (ruupaloka), and the four "higher" jhaanas associated with the Formless World (aruupaloka). They are referred to in similar terms in the first eight sections of Sa.myutta 40 (not included in this Anthology) thus: 1. "With Thought-Conception" (savitakka); 2. "Without Thought-Conception" (avitakka); 3. "By Happiness" (sukhena); 4. "Balanced" (upekkhako); 5. "[Infinity of] Space" (aakaasa); 6. "[Infinity of] Consciousness" (viññaana); 7. "Nothingness" (akiñcañña); 8. "Neither-perception [nor-non-perception]" (nevasaññii). For further details of these absorptions, which are pre-Buddhist and not essential to the attainment of enlightenment, see BD [Buddhist Dictionary (2nd ed.), by Ven. Nyaa.natiloka, Ven. Nyaa.naponika (ed.), Colombo 1972].
  163.  
  164.  
  165.  
  166. the occidental has access to many contemplations bringing a unification of the mind with the object of contemplation: the study of the breath in the monotheist religions can lead to profound calm.
  167. The Tathagata claims nonetheless that the best samadhi will not lead to nibbana.
  168. Only the right view, through the analysis of the five aggregates to notice the three characteristics of the conditioned phenomenon leads to nibbana.
  169. >The tranquillity lessens drastically the desires to sensual pleasures, but do not eradicate them.
  170. >Only the understanding of the five aggregates leads, through the dissociation, to the nibbana.
  171.  
  172.  
  173. ===what are the five aggregates ?===
  174. >The five skandhas[edit]
  175. >The sutras describe five aggregates:[d]
  176. >"form" or "matter"[e] (Skt., Pāli rūpa; Tib. gzugs): external and internal matter. Externally, rupa is the physical world. Internally, rupa includes the material >body and the physical sense organs.[f]
  177. >"sensation" or "feeling" (Skt., Pāli vedanā; Tib. tshor-ba): sensing an object[g] as either pleasant, unpleasant or neutral.[h][i]
  178. >"perception", "conception", "apperception", "cognition", or "discrimination" (Skt. samjñā, Pāli saññā, Tib. 'du-shes): registers whether an object is recognized or >not (for instance, the sound of a bell or the shape of a tree).
  179. >"mental formations", "impulses", "volition", "fabrications" or "compositional factors" (Skt. samskāra, Pāli saṅkhāra, Tib. 'du-byed): all types of mental habits, >thoughts, ideas, opinions, prejudices, compulsions, and decisions triggered by an object.[j]
  180. >"consciousness" or "discernment"[k] (Skt. vijñāna, Pāli viññāṇa,[l] Tib. rnam-par-shes-pa):
  181. >In the Nikayas/Āgamas: cognizance,[7][m] that which discerns[8][n]
  182. >In the Abhidhamma: a series of rapidly changing interconnected discrete acts of cognizance.[o]
  183. >In some Mahayana sources: the base that supports all experience.[p]
  184. >The Buddhist literature describes the aggregates as arising in a linear or progressive fashion, from form to feeling to perception to mental formations to >consciousness.[q] In the early texts, the scheme of the five aggregates is not meant to be an exhaustive classification of the sentient being. Rather it describes various aspects of the way an individual manifests.[9]
  185.  
  186.  
  187.  
  188.  
  189.  
  190.  
  191.  
  192.  
  193. >Suffering and release[edit]
  194. >Bhikkhu Bodhi (2000b, p. 840) states that an examination of the aggregates has a "critical role" in the Buddha's teaching for several reasons, including:[r]
  195. >Understanding suffering: the five aggregates are the "ultimate referent" in the Buddha's elaboration on dukkha (suffering) in his First Noble Truth: "Since all four truths revolve around suffering, understanding the aggregates is essential for understanding the Four Noble Truths as a whole."
  196. >Clinging causes future suffering: the five aggregates are the substrata for clinging and thus "contribute to the causal origination of future suffering".
  197. Release from samsara: clinging to the five aggregates must be removed in order to achieve release from samsara.
  198.  
  199.  
  200.  
  201. >some secular teacher for those who enjoy them
  202. The Experience of Samadhi: An In-depth Exploration of Buddhist Meditation by Richard Shankman
  203. https://www.youtube.com/user/MettaDharma/playlists
  204. http://audiodharma.org/teacher/135/
  205.  
  206.  
  207. >begin with a youtube video:
  208. ven rakkhita Foundations of Buddhist Culture Modules Playlist
  209. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS8CNXvOOJGgz64i07kaYIOxdBYNvqcUZ
  210.  
  211.  
  212. >Entire collections of the suttas in pali and english, and the comparisons with other famous sources
  213. Index to Sutta Indexes
  214. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/sutta_toc.htm
  215.  
  216.  
  217. Various suttas in Pali, english, chinese, french and more
  218. https://suttacentral.net/
  219.  
  220.  
  221. >resources for explanations of the suttas
  222. Piya Tan, a former Theravada monk
  223. http://dharmafarer.org/wordpress/
  224.  
  225.  
  226. >A Comprehensive Course in Buddhism
  227. http://obo.genaud.net/dhammatalk/the_pali_line/course/table_of_contents.htm
  228.  
  229.  
  230. >One Dhamma Talk, in order to have the general exposition of the observation of lack of self
  231. Anatta = "Not-Self" not "No-Self"
  232. http://obo.genaud.net/dhammatalk/bd_dhammatalk/dhamma_talk/not_self.htm#alagada
  233.  
  234.  
  235.  
  236. >===MINIMAL LIST OF THE MOST IMPORTANT SUTTAS===
  237.  
  238. >===THE GOALS===
  239. >To understand the difference from the common person, the person under training, the aharant, the buddha
  240. Mulapariyaya Sutta from the Suttas of the Majjhima Nikaya Book I The Mulapannasa — The Root 50
  241. 1. Mulapariyaya Sutta (Muulapariyaaya, Mūlapariyāya), I.1
  242. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/mn/idx_majjhima_nikaya_1.htm#p1
  243.  
  244.  
  245. >===THE DETAILS OF WHY DUKKHA===
  246. >to understand dependent co-arising (paticca samuppada) and not-self (anatta) [not no-self]
  247. Maha NIdana Sutta for Paticca Samuppada from the Suttas of the Digha Nikaya
  248. 15. Maha nidana Sutta, (Mahaanidaana, Mahā-Nidāna), II.55
  249. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/dn/idx_digha_nikaya.htm#p15
  250.  
  251.  
  252. >The Water-Snake Simile
  253. Suttas of the Majjhima Nikaya, Book I, The Mulapannasa — The Root 50
  254. 22. Alagaddupama Sutta (Alagadduupama, Alagaddūpama), I.130
  255. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/mn/idx_majjhima_nikaya_1.htm#p22
  256.  
  257.  
  258.  
  259.  
  260. >===MORALITY===
  261. >BEHAVIOR TOWARDS OTHERS AS WELL AS OURSELVES
  262. >to understand how to behave towards ourselves, that is to say the contemplation, the establishment of ''mindfulness''
  263. Satipatthana Sutta from the Suttas of the Majjhima Nikaya Book I The Mulapannasa — The Root 50
  264. 10. Satipatthana Sutta (Satipa.t.thaana, Satipatthāna), I.55
  265. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/mn/idx_majjhima_nikaya_1.htm#p10
  266.  
  267.  
  268. Mahasatipatthana Sutta from the Suttas of the Digha Nikaya
  269. 22. Mahasatipatthana Sutta (Mahaasatipa.t.thaana, Mahā-Satipatthāna), II.290
  270. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/dn/idx_digha_nikaya.htm#p22
  271.  
  272.  
  273. >What is concern? From taking its stand on non-attachment (alobha), non-hatred (adveDa), and non-deludedness (amoha) coupled with diligence (vīrya), it considers whatever is positive and protects the mind against things which cannot satisfy. Its function is to make complete and to realize all worldly and transworldly excellences.
  274.  
  275. Appamāda Carefulness, Earnestness, Diligence
  276. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/glossology/glossology/appamada.htm
  277. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/apradama
  278.  
  279.  
  280. Nekkamma Dumping, Giving Up, Renunciation
  281. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/glossology/glossology/nekkamma.htm
  282. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nekkamma
  283.  
  284.  
  285. Upekkha Objective Detachment, Equanimity
  286. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/glossology/glossology/upekkha.htm
  287. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upekkha
  288.  
  289.  
  290. four immeasurables/Brahmavihara/apramāna/appamaññā
  291. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmavihara
  292. >The four immeasurables are:
  293. >Loving-kindness/benevolence (Pāli: mettā, Sanskrit: maitrī) towards all: the hope that a person will be well; "the wish that all sentient beings, without any exception, be happy."[11]
  294. >Compassion/charity (Pāli and Sanskrit: karunā): the hope that a person's sufferings will diminish; "the wish for all sentient beings to be free from suffering."[11]
  295. >Empathetic joy (Pāli and Sanskrit: muditā): joy in the accomplishments of a person—oneself or another; sympathetic joy; "the wholesome attitude of rejoicing in the happiness and virtues of all sentient beings."[11]
  296. >Equanimity (Pāli: upekkhā, Sanskrit: upekkā): learning to accept loss and gain, good-repute and ill-repute, praise and censure, sorrow and happiness (Attha Loka Dhamma),[12] all with detachment, equally, for oneself and for others. Equanimity is "not to distinguish between friend, enemy or stranger, but regard every sentient being as equal. It is a clear-minded tranquil state of mind—not being overpowered by delusions, mental dullness or agitation."[13]
  297.  
  298.  
  299. Metta Sutta: Good Will from the Samyutta Nikaya SN 46.54 translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
  300. http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn46/sn46.054.than.html
  301.  
  302.  
  303. Brahmavihara Sutta: The Sublime Attitudes from the Anguttara Nikaya AN 10.208 translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
  304. http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an10/an10.208.than.html
  305.  
  306.  
  307.  
  308.  
  309.  
  310. >===EXPOSITION OF THE CONTEMPLATION===
  311.  
  312. >Dialogues of the Buddha
  313. Digha Nikaya, Sutta 34, XXXIV. Dasuttara Suttanta
  314. 34. Dasuttara Sutta, III 272
  315. http://obo.genaud.net/a/backmatter/indexes/sutta/dn/idx_digha_nikaya.htm#p34
  316.  
  317.  
  318. The Anapanasati Sutta --A Practical Guide to Mindfulness of Breathing and Tranquil Wisdom Meditation by Ven. U Vimalaramsi
  319. http://www.ic.sunysb.edu/clubs/buddhism/vimalaramsi/main.html
  320. >MN 118 Mindfulness of Breathing - Ānāpānasati Sutta (Anapanasati Sutta)
  321. Majjhima Nikaya 118 Mindfulness of Breathing - Ānāpānasati Sutta, A very important discourse explaining mindfulness of breathing and how it relates to the four foundations of mindfulness, to the seven enlightenment factors, and to true knowledge and deliverance.
  322. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIGZcoKeeWI
  323.  
  324.  
  325. >Sutta Study Class with Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi series:
  326. Majjhima Nikaya (MN 118: part 1-1, 2014.7.19) Bhikkhu Bodhi
  327. Chapter 118: Ānāpānasati Sutta - Mindfulness of Breathing. "The Majjhima Nikaya, the Middle Length Discourses", An exposition of sixteen steps in mindfulness of breathing and of the relation of this meditation to the four foundations of mindfulness and the seven enlightenment factors.
  328. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HS0BaNYSv8U
  329. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNAp1yQM1PE
  330. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZCbxb1mk-o
  331. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxblItC8q3Y
  332. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLadYTdMy20
  333.  
  334.  
  335. >Transcendental Dependent Arising
  336. Suttas of the Samyutta Nikaya Nidanaavagga
  337. III. Dasabala (Dasabalaa, Dasabalā), II.27
  338. 23. Upanisa (Upanisaa, Upanisā), II.29
  339. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/sn/02_nv/idx_12_nidanasamyutta.htm#p23
  340.  
  341.  
  342. >How to establish an awareness of the being[=mind+body]
  343. Majjhima Nikaya Sutta 119 Kayagata-sati Sutta
  344. 119. Kayagatasati Sutta, (Kaayagataasati, Kāyagatāsati), III.88
  345. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/mn/idx_majjhima_nikaya_3.htm#p119
  346. Middle Length Sayings, Final Fifty Discourses, Discourse on mindfulness of body
  347. https://suttacentral.net/en/mn119
  348. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayagatasati_Sutta
  349.  
  350.  
  351. >Sutta Study Class with Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi series:
  352. Chapter 119: Kāyagatāsati Sutta - Mindfulness of the body, "The Majjhima Nikaya, the Middle Length Discourses", The Buddha explains how mindfulness of the body should be developed and cultivated and the benefits to which it leads.
  353. Majjhima Nikaya (MN 119: part 1-1, 2014.8.23) Bhikkhu Bodhi
  354. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU2u_kwSrj8
  355. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVPxqG5okQk
  356. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpEZV3KeaSA
  357. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvOHYVAn-sk
  358.  
  359.  
  360. >The animitta-ceto-samadhi is the contemplation that people call ''pure hindsight (vipassana)'' when they think in terms of the dichotomy ''samatha-vipassana''...
  361. Samyutta Nikāya, IV. Salāyatana Vagga, 40. Moggalāna Samyutta, 9. Animitta Suttam, IV.268
  362. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/sn/04_salv/idx_40_moggallanasamyutta.htm#p9
  363.  
  364. >The Greater Discourse on Emptiness
  365. Majjhima Nikaya, Sutta 122, Mahāsuññata suttam
  366. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/mn/idx_majjhima_nikaya_3.htm#p122
  367.  
  368. Sutta Study Class with Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi series:
  369. Mahāsuññata Sutta: The Greater Discourse on Voidness. Upon finding that the bhikkhus have grown fond of socialising, the Buddha stresses the need for seclusion in order to abide in voidness. Majjhima Nikaya (MN 122: part 1, 2014.11.16) Bhikkhu Bodhi.
  370. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvpTp_soGTs
  371. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbRFQ5btfHo
  372. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=919pQmum4yo
  373. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUna331UGlI
  374.  
  375.  
  376.  
  377.  
  378. >questions and answers
  379. Majjhimnanikāyo, Mūlapannāsako, V. Cūlayamakavaggo, Sutta 43, Mahāvedalla sutta
  380. 43. Mahavedalla Sutta, (Mahaavedalla, Mahāvedalla), I.292
  381. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/mn/idx_majjhima_nikaya_1.htm#p43
  382.  
  383.  
  384. >Moggalāna states what is the signless contemplation
  385. Samyutta Nikāya, IV. Salāyatana Vagga, 40. Moggalāna Samyutta, 9. Animitta Suttam, IV.268
  386. http://obo.genaud.net/backmatter/indexes/sutta/sn/04_salv/idx_40_moggallanasamyutta.htm#p9
  387.  
  388.  
  389. “Signless” Meditations in Pāli Buddhism P Harvey - ‎1986 8674-8482-1-PB.pdf
  390. https://journals.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php/jiabs/article/viewFile/8674/2581
  391.  
  392.  
  393. Living Word of the Buddha, SD vol 24 no 19 S 40.9, On the Question of the Signless Concentration of Mind, Animitta Ceto,samādhi Pañha Sutta, The Discourse on the Question of the Signless Concentration of Mind, [How to progress in the signless concentration], (Samyutta Nikaya 40.9/4:268 f), Translated by Piya Tan ©2008
  394. Animitta Ceto,samādhi Pañha Sutta.
  395. http://dharmafarer.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/24.19-Animitta-Cetosamadhi-Panha-S-s40.9-piya.pdf
  396.  
  397.  
  398. Samyutta Nikāya 12, Connected Discourses on Causation
  399. https://suttacentral.net/sn12
  400. 1. Dependent Origination
  401. https://suttacentral.net/en/sn12.1
  402. 2. Analysis of Dependent Origination
  403. https://suttacentral.net/en/sn12.2
  404.  
  405.  
  406. Upanisa Sutta: Prerequisites translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu © 1997
  407. http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn12/sn12.023.than.html
  408. Transcendental Dependent Arising, A Translation and Exposition of the Upanisa Sutta, by Bhikkhu Bodhi © 1995
  409. http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/bodhi/wheel277.html
  410.  
  411.  
  412. The Doctrine of Paticcasamuppada by U Than Daing
  413. http://wisdomlib.org/buddhism/book/the-doctrine-of-paticcasamuppada/index.html
  414.  
  415.  
  416. A Discourse on Paticcasamuppada or The Doctrine of Dependent Origination by U Aye Maung
  417. http://wisdomlib.org/buddhism/book/a-discourse-on-paticcasamuppada/index.html
  418.  
  419.  
  420.  
  421.  
  422. >===RESSOURCES on the CONTEMPLATION===
  423. ===IMPORTANT BOOKS===
  424. >insisting on the setting the samatha first, this book recast the use of the mindfulness through the three angas
  425. [swift introduction to the various sources PLUS good introduction to ''mindfulness'']
  426. A History of Mindfulness Bhikkhu Sujato.pdf
  427. http://santifm.org/santipada/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/A_History_of_Mindfulness_Bhikkhu_Sujato.pdf
  428.  
  429.  
  430. >the direct path to nirvana via the famous satipatthana sutta exposed by a theravadan
  431. Anãlayo satipatthana direct path analayo free-distribution-copy2.pdf
  432. https://ahandfulofleaves.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/satipatthana_direct-path_analayo_free-distribution-copy2.pdf
  433.  
  434.  
  435.  
  436. >This site is dedicated to the teachings of Venerable Ayya Khema (1923-1997), a Theravada Buddhist nun ordained in Sri Lanka . Her teachings (which were prolific) describe simple and effective meditation methods for development of calm and insight, for expanding feelings of loving-kindness, compassion, joy and equanimity towards others, and for overcoming obstacles to practice. She also gives detailed and lucid instructions for the meditative absorptions (jhanas) which provide access to higher states of consciousness, the way the Buddha himself practiced.
  437. http://ayyakhematalks.org/
  438.  
  439.  
  440. >an approach focused more on vipassana
  441. In This Very Life, The Liberation Teachings of the Buddha, Sayādaw U Pandita (1992), (Serialised with the Sayādaw’s Express Permission)
  442. http://homepage.ntlworld.com/pesala/Pandita/index.htm
  443.  
  444.  
  445.  
  446. >are the jhanas required for strem-entry ?
  447. The Jhānas and the Lay Disciple According to the Pāli Suttas, Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi
  448. http://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha267.htm
  449.  
  450.  
  451.  
  452. >a book to become a yogi in vipassana
  453. Pa Auk Sayadaw Knowing and Seeing 4th Ed 2010.pdf
  454. http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books13/Pa-Auk-Sayadaw_Knowing-and-Seeing-4th-Ed-2010.pdf
  455. >This Burmese method puts forth the quality that is SATI [translated as mindfulness generally]: alertness/attention to whatever we perceive, plus a constant effort to recognize the five aggregates, learnt from the dhamma and remembering it, into every phenomenon. There are other qualities to have, such as effort [in walking or standing up], tranquillity, faith in the dhamma, wisdom [little insight, not the one of the five aggregates, but wisdom on being able to make headways], but the Burmese bet that the more SATI we have, the closer we are to nibanna. SATI does not need to be done a little, to be compensated by another quality if done too much, contrary to, for instance, samadhi [=concentration, generally gotten after samatha-tranquility of the mind and body] which needs to be balanced with effort. We can never ever do enough sati.
  456. a general pdf more about overview on buddhism through this technique
  457. http://www.paaukforestmonastery.org/books/teaching_training.pdf
  458.  
  459.  
  460. Explanation of the meditation on the spheres [kilesas], relevant for the most imginative contemplators, as well as the contemplation without signs (animitta-ceto-samadhi) which is the samadhi wherein the Tathagata enterred when he was ill. The animitta-ceto-samadhi is the contemplation that people call ''pure hindsight (vipassana)'' when they think in terms of the dichotomy ''samatha-vipassana''...
  461.  
  462.  
  463. ===A GOOD WEBSITE INSTRUCTING ON THE ''VIPASSANA MEDITATION'' WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND VIDEOS OF EACH STEP.===
  464. >What is Vipassana or Insight Meditation?
  465. http://www.vipassanadhura.com/whatis.htm
  466. http://vipassanadhura.com/howto.htm
  467. with video of a duration of 50 minutes
  468. http://vipassanadhura.com/mindfulness.html
  469. >Vipassana (insight meditation) is the ultimate expression of Socrates' dictum, "know thyself." The Buddha discovered that the cause of suffering can actually be erased when we see our true nature. This is a radical insight. It means that our happiness does not depend on manipulating the external world. We only have to see ourselves clearly— a much easier proposition (but in the ultimate sense, knowing oneself with clarity reveals there is no permanent self, as the Buddha taught).
  470. >Vipassana meditation is a rational method for purifying the mind of the mental factors that cause distress and pain. This simple technique does not invoke the help of a god, spirit or any other external power, but relies on our own efforts.
  471. >Vipassana is an insight that cuts through conventional perception to perceive mind and matter as they actually are: impermanent, unsatisfactory, and impersonal. Insight meditation gradually purifies the mind, eliminating all forms of attachment. As attachment is cut away, desire and delusion are gradually diluted. The Buddha identified these two factors— desire and ignorance— as the roots of suffering. When they are finally removed, the mind will touch something permanent beyond the changing world. That "something" is the deathless, supramundane happiness, called "Nibbana" in Pali.
  472. >Insight meditation is concerned with the present moment— with staying in the now to the most extreme degree possible. It consists of observing body (rupa) and mind (nama) with bare attention.
  473. >The word "vipassana" has two parts. "Passana" means seeing, i.e., perceiving. The prefix "vi" has several meanings, one of which is "through." Vipassana-insight literally cuts through the curtain of delusion in the mind. "Vi" can also function as the English prefix "dis," suggesting discernment— a kind of seeing that perceives individual components separately. The idea of separation is relevant here, for insight works like a mental scalpel, differentiating conventional truth from ultimate reality. Lastly, "vi" can function as an intensive, in which case "vipassana" means intense, deep or powerful seeing. It is an immediate insight experienced before one's eyes, having nothing to do with reasoning or thinking.
  474.  
  475.  
  476. Moment to Moment Mindfulness, A PICTORIAL MANUAL FOR MEDITATORS, Achan Sobin S. Namto
  477. http://vipassanadhura.com/momenttomoment.htm
  478.  
  479.  
  480. ===HOW TO CONDUCT OURSELVEF DURING THE INTERVIEW AFTER A CONTEMPLATIVE CESSION===
  481. Wayfaring: A Manual for Insight Meditation, by Bhikkhu Sobin S. Namto, Wheels No: 266 / 267
  482. http://vipassanadhura.com/WayfaringGuideMeditators.html
  483.  
  484.  
  485.  
  486. >the journal of a contemplator in a retreat about ''pure vipassana''
  487. http://www.updevelopment.org/pa-auk-tawya/
  488.  
  489.  
  490.  
  491. >an exposition of the flaws of ''pure vipassana meditation'' which focuses more on loving-kindness meditation
  492. The Anapanasati Sutta --A Practical Guide to Midfulness of Breathing and Tranquil Wisdom Meditation by Ven. U Vimalaramsi
  493. http://www.ic.sunysb.edu/clubs/buddhism/vimalaramsi/main.html
  494.  
  495.  
  496.  
  497. >exposition of the path by one of the monk from the monastery of the forest
  498. Ajahn Maha Bua
  499. http://www.luangta.eu/site/downloads.php
  500.  
  501.  
  502. >collection of sermons on Nibbana
  503. >This penetrative study[5] shed new light on the early Buddhist views on the psychology of perception,[6] the conceptualizing process and its transcending.[7]
  504. Katukurunde Nanananda Thera, Nibbana - the mind stilled
  505. http://www.seeingthroughthenet.net/eng/gen.php?gp=books&cat=ms&p=1
  506. http://www.seeingthroughthenet.net/eng/gen.php?gp=sermons&cat=nn&p=1
  507.  
  508.  
  509. >talks on Vipassana meditation
  510. Sayadaw U Pandita
  511. http://www.panditarama.net/#ui-tabs-9
  512.  
  513.  
  514. Burmese forest tradition
  515. The Essential Practice Part I Dhamma Discourses of Venerable Webu Sayādaw
  516. http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh375-u.html
  517. The Essential Practice Part II Dhamma Discourses of Venerable Webu Sayādaw
  518. http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh384-u.html
  519. The Essence of Buddha Dhamma
  520. http://host.pariyatti.org/treasures/The_Essence_Buddha_Dhamma-Ven_Webu_Sayadaw.pdf
  521.  
  522.  
  523. >===SWIFT EXPOSITION of SUCHNESS===
  524. The dhamma is the beginning of our lives by a reflection on the end of our lives.
  525. To understand buddha is to recognize these five points in each phenomenon perceived through the 6 senses [there are 6 senses in the dhamma].
  526. to understand the Tathagata is to perceive reality as reality.
  527. reminder that the basic equation from the dhamma is to perceive without an ''I''.
  528. The non-buddhist thinks thus:
  529. >perception of reality + [belief in an] I = identification of the ''I'' with the perceptions of reality = suffering or jouissance
  530. which leads, as stated, to pain and joy, desire of pain [for a few] and joy [for the hedonist], aversion towards pain and avidity towards pleasures, raving on the memories of the past, calculating the future.
  531. Whereas a buddha thinks thus:
  532. >perception of reality + destruction of I = perception of reality
  533.  
  534. a buddha experiences pure reality.
  535. a buddha experiences pure thusness.
  536. a buddha experiences pure suchness.
  537. A buddha destroys every filter that the common people call me/affinities/preferences between him and the reality [or rather, perception of reality, to speak as a realist].
  538. A buddha does not think in terms of object-medium-subject, a budhha is pure being.
  539. how to reach the state of purely being ?
  540.  
  541. We use reflexivity, reflexivity until we understand that there is no ''I'', some proper essence which control something [this something should be uncontionned, without some conditions, since to control means really to do whatever you want, regardless of the exterior world]
  542. we separate ourselves, as much as possible, from whatever we perceive, then whatever we believe to be the ''I'''[=what would what we can control, at the very least].
  543. We acknowledge only the present and try to see what goes on in the present.
  544. We do not think of the past nor of the future.
  545.  
  546. We try to detach ourselves from the direct perception in noting/labelling what we perceive.
  547. The goal is to experience what we feel when a film ends, or the TV is shut down.
  548. We suddenly get back to reality, after being absorbed into the entertainment that was the film.
  549. In noting, we take control of us and yank out of perceptions.
  550. The labelling via some short words of our perceptions will permit do un-sew us from our perceptions.
  551.  
  552.  
  553. >the first step in the path of the dhamma is to apply the morality: equanimity inwards [ of what we think as us], outwards [of what we think as us], every where, every time.
  554. To act morally will clear our mind, as opposed to our state of mind if you keep lying, stealing etc.
  555. we worry too often if we do not act morally, whereas it is already difficult to calm the mind when we act morally.
  556. morality here is how we must behave [think, speak, do] towards others and ourselves.
  557. The traditional term ''morality'' applies really to ''behaviour towards others'' especially in liberal societies having faith in the dichotomy public-private, but I take the view that meditation is part of ''how to behave towards ourself'' and since it touches the subject of ''how to behave in life'', the contemplation is part of the morality.
  558.  
  559. Many people find these rules to be constrains, to be rules.
  560. They fail to understand that this rules appear natural once we become enlightened.
  561. The Tathagata did not apply the dhammic morality before he was enlightened.
  562. the wager of the Tathagata is that the consequences of the awakening about how to behave can be causes of the reach of nibbana.
  563. [it is always the same question, the one of the education: how to make something intuitive, according to us, understood by somebody else ? the best bet is to tell people to behave as they would behave if they were already behaving appropriately.]
  564.  
  565. Once that we are enlightened, you do not find the rules to be rules; they are not constrains.
  566. An enlightened being do not even think of doing something else than what the Tathagata said was right.
  567. When it comes to the kamma, the aharant does not produce any, not bad nor good fruits of kamma will be produced.
  568. >reaching nibbana => dhammic morality
  569. the Tathagata bets that dhammic morality associated to the study of the dhamma leads to nibbana:
  570. >[dhammic morality + study of the dhamma] <=> [wisdom + automatic reaching of nibbana]
  571.  
  572. Samatha/samadhi is not buddhist per se.
  573. What the buddha discovered is the breath as the object of meditation [which can lead to samatha alone and the state of concentration that are the jhanas alone] as an object to get wisdom, since the breath has the three characteristics of every conditioned phenomenon..
  574. To study the breath is called anapassati.
  575. The Tathagata said that the anapassati is the quickest method to get wisdom.
  576.  
  577. in the first four states of jhanas, in order to gain a tranquillity leading to higher concentration [unification of the mind with the object], we study an object, contrary to the contemplation of pure insight [vipassana] where we no longer focus on one object, but see all phenomenon occurring throughout your 6 senses [there are 6 senses in the dhamma] in order to discover the characteristics : the impersonality, the impermanence and the dissatisfaction.
  578. the method of pure insight is to quickly switch to all the namas [mental formation] and rupas [material formations] without privileging one senses, even less one phenomenon.
  579.  
  580. In pure insight, we follow what happens in us; whereas, in samatha, we concentrate on one thing [such as the breath, the death etc.] and even if you are disturbed, you go back to the initial object of meditation.
  581. so:
  582. -insight is necessary for everybody to reach nibbana
  583. -insight [as a beginning method] is sufficient only for a minority of people
  584. -even if we favour vipassana, we will grow old of it to better switch to the calm meditation for a while, just to do something else in your life, before returning to vipassana.
  585. -it is easier for most people to develop samatha first [in watching the breath typically]
  586. -we have other object than the breath to get into jhanas; for instance, we can do the metta contemplation, or reflect on death, equanimity and dozens of other subjects.
  587.  
  588.  
  589. The Metta contemplation is shared by many religions, jainism, buddhism, even christians and the others since it leads to equanimity.
  590. the equanimity does not depend on religion.
  591. Many enjoy the objects which is compassion for Christians, metta for buddhism and all this.
  592. We recite a little prayers [for Christians] or suttra for asians where we wish happiness for people:
  593. -first that we love beforehand
  594. -second towards whom we are neutral
  595. -third, that we dislike
  596. of course, as in the other religions, too few people apply the morality of their doctrine and even less meditate and even contemplate.
  597.  
  598.  
  599. we have other objects whereon to focus.
  600. The objects, the methods and the results are more or less focused on, depending on each schools.
  601. Not every body agrees on what is necessary and sufficient to gain wisdom through jhanas.
  602. some monks say that jhanas are necessary, some say that a light version of jahnas are necessary, some say that jhanas are not necessary. Some monks say that a true awaken through vipassana only will master the samatha-jhanas as well later on.
  603. -once pure samatha is developed, we get concentration [samadhi] which is crucial
  604. -after we have pure samadhi [throughout the eight jhanas or even form the first jhana] we develop widsom
  605. -amongst those who begin with pure samatha and continue up to the 8 jahnas, a few people will manage to develop wisdom INSIDE the higher mundane jhanas, but most people will need to leave the pure samadhi meditation and switch to pure vipassana
  606.  
  607.  
  608. The jhanas are said to be dangerous, because the hedonists love them too much [since they reject the dhammic morality which is supposed to come beforehand]
  609. The first 4 jhanas are said to be very pleasant, and people may not wish to detach themselves from this pleasures.
  610. Even the people preferring the equanimity over the pleasures may not want to leave their fourth jhanas.
  611. Once more, the jhanas alone will not lead to nibbana, and even worse, only a few people will reflect on wisdom inside their jhanas.
  612. >The jahnas lessen drastically the desires to sensual pleasures, but do not eradicate them.
  613. >Only the understanding of the five aggregates leads to the nibbana.
  614.  
  615.  
  616. a short video on the jhanas
  617. >[YouTube] What is Jhana? By Ven. Henepola Gunaratana Nayaka Maha Thera(Bhante G) (embed)
  618. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Lv0PFLZ12o
  619.  
  620.  
  621. >[YouTube] Bhante Gunaratana (1) What is samatha-vipassana? Part 1: samatha (embed)
  622. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaFOjJtEd2g
  623. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESQOi9djyaA
  624. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41NpmB2le3I
  625. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=div3NnAIoYU
  626. and all the others videos from this series
  627.  
  628.  
  629. >The Jhanas in Theravada Buddhist Meditation by Henepola Gunaratana
  630. http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/gunaratana/wheel351.html#ch1.3
  631.  
  632. >Mindfulness in plain English, Bhante Henepola Gunaratana.
  633. http://www.urbandharma.org/pdf2/Mindfulness%20in%20Plain%20English%20Book%20Preview.pdf
  634.  
  635.  
  636. Finally, we must understand that the Tathagata through his dhamma does not tell us how to fill up our days.
  637. That the dhamma does not save anybody.
  638. That the dhamma sets us straight, but we still continue to live once nibbana attained.
  639. We continue to eat, to sleep and to fill up our days, day after day.
  640. The typical activity of the Tathagata was to teach intermittently with a few weeks of pure contemplation.
  641. The typical activities of the aharant were to teach intermittently and to engage intermittently, with the other aharants, in what we call today the philosophy, with a few weeks of pure contemplation.
  642. Since the Tathagata claimed that his dhamma is the only manner to eradicate the longing for sensual pleasures, it is expected that the ataraxia throughout the necessary and natural desires à la Epicurus become the sole desires only for the aharant.
  643. The typical life of an aharant is thus epicurean= teaching, contemplation, philosophy (which includes what we call science today).
  644.  
  645.  
  646. The dhamma sets us straight to live in society, not in the forest nor to spend our life isolated from the others, far away from the cities.
  647. If there is an isolation advocated in the dhamma, it is the isolation of the sensual pleasures, but for most people, the physical reclusion is necessary to reach such a sensual reclusion.
  648. At the end of the process, we still experience, until the death, pleasures and pains, but those do not turn into a suffering nor a joy.
  649. The sole joy is the one of the equanimity+benevolence.
  650.  
  651.  
  652. we still continue to live once nibbana attained.
  653.  
  654.  
  655.  
  656. At that time, a certain monk named Thera was living alone and commending such a life. He entered the village alone, he returned alone, he sat alone and walked alone. So a number of other monks went and told the Lord this, and he asked them to call Thera into his presence. When he came, the Lord asked him: “Is it true as they say that you are living quite alone and that you commend such a life?”
  657.  
  658. “That is so, Lord.”
  659.  
  660. “In what way do you live and commend?”
  661.  
  662. “I enter the village alone, I return alone, I sit alone and walk alone.”
  663.  
  664. “That is living alone, it is true, Thera. But I will tell you a way of bringing to perfection the solitary life. When the past is put away, when the future is given up and when there is no craving and desire in the present, then the solitary life has been perfected in full.”
  665.  
  666. -- S.II,283
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