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Minotaur Hotel - Contracts

MinoAnon Jun 7th, 2019 (edited) 426 Never
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  1. Collection of Notable Contracts Written by Anon
  2. 1. Statute of Mythical Guests
  3. A collection of rules that govern the acceptance of mythical creatures into the Hotel as Guests.
  4. Mythicals were banned from entering, as it was possible they'd snitch about the Hotel to the Gods. But with this Statute that rule was revoked, while at the same time establishing particular procedures.
  5. Mythicals who are taken as Guests must sign a self-enforcing Non-Disclosure Agreement. Breaking this Agreement incurs in harsh penalties.
  6. Mythicals must also sign a self-enforcing Non-Aggression Pact.
  7.  
  8. 2. Reformed Code of Non-Sentient Lifeforms
  9. Lifeforms such as non-sentient animals can spawn randomly in the Labyrinth but are set to attack Asterion. This is a feature of the Labyrinth's design and revoking such provision is unconstitutional.
  10. One can, however, make the clauses around it so labyrinthine that, in essence, it has its effects revoked.
  11. Anon laid out a series of conditional statements that make it so, in essence, the conditions to trigger attacks against Asterion are impossible to be fulfilled.
  12. Having animals ignore Asterion was supposed to be an exception, but careful exploitation of the Labyrinth's coding has turned the exception into the de facto rule.
  13.  
  14. Collection of Contracts Unearthed by Anon
  15. 1.
  16. >> Spontaneous Generation of Life
  17. >>This is a binding, regular contract. Its enforcement is mandatory and it can be amended. It rules over the creation of life in the Labyrinth.
  18. >>This Contract contains a labyrinthine list of lifeforms; perhaps a list of all lifeforms there are in planet Earth. The spontaneous creation of nearly all of them has been manually turned off, as all are set to immediately attack Asterion.
  19. >>It does not stop lifeforms from copulating and generating offspring.
  20. >>One day a Master tired of always having eagles peck away at Asterion's liver, and so the first version of this Contract came to be. That Master preferred crows.
  21. >> Seems like previous Masters, even the most generous ones, found it easier to blacklist animals entirely than to rework how they act towards Asterion.
  22.  
  23. 2.
  24. > This Contract deals with ownership and inheritance of the Hotel. It is a non-binding agreement that the current Master, upon retiring from his duty, usually transfers ownership of the Hotel to a promising long-standing guest of the Hotel.
  25. > There was a provision on what happens if a Master dies before transferring ownership, but it's been crossed out and is unreadable.
  26. > The Contract dates back to about a millenia.
  27. > You make a mental note to search about immortality next time you look over the files; for now however your mind is fried.
  28.  
  29. 3.
  30. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  31. Why would a God offer mercy to a hybrid monstrosity whose meekness brought shame to the land of Crete? One would believe Asterion was abandoned by all.
  32. This fragment of the trial, however, tells a different tale.
  33. Poseidon granted the Cretan Bull to King Minos, who sworn to sacrifice it in the God's honor. He broke his oath and this lead to the birth of Asterion. The Cretan Bull was killed by Theseus and sacrificed to Athena. Theseus would later kill Asterion as well.
  34. Poseidon stood in defense of Asterion, demanding he be returned to the sea -- to his home.
  35. Perhaps the old God had a soft spot in him for the hybrid monstrosity -- a grandfather often coddles his grandchild, after all.
  36. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  37. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Poseidon's favor.
  38.  
  39. 4.
  40. An exceptionally rare text.
  41. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  42. Poseidon did not find victory in his defense of Asterion. Nonetheless he accrued enough favor to influence Asterion's final sentence.
  43. It was Poseidon's demand that Asterion be exiled in a Hub Realm instead of a Low-Level Realm.
  44. The distinction between those two is not made clear in this excerpt.
  45. Poseidon also had it so other people could exiled, like Asterion, to the Labyrinth. But none ever were.
  46. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  47. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Poseidon's incomprehensible choices.
  48.  
  49. 5.
  50. An exceptionally rare text.
  51. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  52. Poseidon did not find victory in his defense of Asterion. Nonetheless he accrued enough favor to influence Asterion's final sentence.
  53. It was not truly understood why Poseidon wanted the Labyrinth to have a Master, much less one who could write and rewrite its laws and inner workings. Some saw it as Poseidon admitting defeat and throwing Asterion to the fires of human cruelty, for a Master could then design a true torture of nightmares. Others, however, saw it as Poseidon's true revenge against Athena.
  54. The Labyrinth was designed to torture Asterion but human ingenuity turned it into a haven of the forlorn.
  55. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  56. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Poseidon's influence.
  57.  
  58. 6.
  59. An exceptionally rare text.
  60. This is an old Contract, binding, constitutional and exuding honor.
  61. It was written by Asterion himself and signed by that age's Master, after the Hotel itself was established.
  62. It establishes that the Master channels his powers to Asterion, and sets the duties, rights and responsibilities of the Keeper. Before this Contract Asterion was a prisoner through and through, with no control over the Labyrinth.
  63. The trappings of servitude often take on drab, unpleasant colors. But for those destitute, cold and hopeless, drab clothes are better than being exposed to the elements.
  64. One ought to keep in mind that Asterion was the designer of his role as Keeper. Perhaps he knows how well he has it, compared to the Labyrinth's original intention.
  65.  
  66. 7.
  67. This is a binding contract. It can be amended.
  68. It deals, quite directly, with Asterion.
  69. He may not copulate with guests of the Hotel, neither may he maintain a relationship with them.
  70. The Contract's contents are quite direct, but its size is gargantuan. All but one of its 30 pages are a treatise on the benefits of celibacy and chastity. What a pious and ascetic Master!
  71. This Master, unknowingly, left out a case undefined -- and by omission, allowed. Asterion may not have a relationship with the guests, but what about one with the Master?
  72.  
  73. 8.
  74. This is not a Contract per se but certainly has the trappings of it.
  75. It is a collection of lullabies. A father once sung those to his children, but they'd all laugh together as Asterion was always the first to fall asleep.
  76. That father, once a Master to the Hotel, saw it fit to immortalize those songs in the form of an everlasting Contract. Perhaps he believed one day another Master could benefit from the art of softly leading Asterion to slumber.
  77. [Your spirit is emboldened by this knowledge.]
  78.  
  79. 9.
  80. This exceptionally venerable document is the oldest Contract in the Labyrinth.
  81. Some Contracts seem to carry a will of their own, as if they were alive, and often display a playful nature. They seldom reveal themselves, and do so only in special circumstances.
  82. This Contract is super-constitutional. It cannot be amended. Its powers are above yours.
  83. It details Asterion's sentence to the Labyrinth, and in doing so creates it in the first place.
  84. The Labyrinth is described as a Hub Realm. It is neither above nor below other Realms.
  85. Divine beings often sentence individuals individuals to the lower realms, where they are isolated from nearly all exits. The choice of exiling Asterion to a hub realm goes against the grain for seemingly no reason, but is precisely what makes it so guests can so easily reach it.
  86. It would seem that, once, some Gods entertained the idea of exiling other souls to the Labyrinth for eternity. But none ever were.
  87.  
  88. 10.
  89. This tenebrous Contract ranks among the oldest of the Labyrinths.
  90. Asterion's torment was meant to be wretched and eternal, but it would seem that someone deemed certain tortures excessive even for him. His body can be repaired, but should his mind snap completely then it would be as if his torment had come to an end.
  91. This Contract contains a list of tenebrous entities which were meant to spawn in the Labyrinth, and immediately afterwards sets -- most of them -- them to not spawn. Their names are mostly incomprehensible but ominous -- Athena's Sprawling Madness, Zeus' Recursive Violation, Ariadne's Wail...
  92. But there are three entities which are still allowed to spawn and were never, ever, disallowed.
  93. Dionysus' Wine;
  94. Hephaestus' Crafting Tools, and
  95. Poseidon's Parting Gift.
  96.  
  97. 11.
  98. This venerable document ranks among the oldest Contracts in the Labyrinth.
  99. The Labyrinth categorizes all entities in it.
  100. The first category to be created is The Prisoner, which encompasses Asterion and only him.
  101. The second category is The Master, which at this moment encompasses you and only you.
  102. The third category is Guest.
  103. There is a fourth; Lower Prisoner, which encompasses no one. A Lower Prisoner would only suffer a fraction of Asterion's torture. It would seem the Gods once entertained the idea of exiling others for eternity to the Labyrinth, but this idea never came to fruition.
  104. All sentences of exile to the Labyrinth are eternal and have no chance of appeal. When one is sentenced, the sentencing God chooses which category will be imposed on the soul.
  105. Asterion cannot be amended into another category. His status as Prisoner is permanent.
  106.  
  107. 12.
  108. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed with the Contracts.
  109. A handful of witnesses were denied by the court; the mythical children of Poseidon attempted a defense of their distant, land-dwelling sibling, Asterion.
  110. It is unwise to let into the Hotel beings who might inform the Gods of Asterion's safety. But if the bonds of family are still to be appreciated the distant offspring of Poseidon might harbor still favor towards the minotaur.
  111. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  112. Unless he's read this document he would not know of his distant kin's favor.
  113.  
  114. 13.
  115. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  116. Athena was the mastermind behind Asterion's demise; she convinced Ariadne to lobby in favor of Asterion's exile, she granted boons upon Theseus, Asterion's killer, and ultimately used her wit to seal the minotaur's eternal damnation.
  117. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  118. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Athena's poison.
  119.  
  120. 14.
  121. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed with the Contracts.
  122. Poseidon summoned a witness to testify in Asterion's favor; his mother, Pasiphae.
  123. She allowed Asterion's exile to the labyrinth where Theseus took his life. But upon his untimely death she fell into grief for the loss of her son, blaming herself, and could not care less that his meekness could bring disgrace to Crete.
  124. How can a mother's love compare against the Gods' iron fists? Pasiphae's love came too late to save her child. Still, she tried and was willing to face the Gods for it.
  125. When speaking about Asterion's kindness she challenged the gods themselves, alleging that meekness ought not be a flaw deserving of the greatest punishment.
  126. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  127. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Pasiphae's love -- it would seem that, even during his life, Pasiphae seldom showed her son affection.
  128.  
  129. 15.
  130. Your R&D team unearthed a document most tenebrous -- it bubbled into existence shortly after the Reformed Code of Non-Sentient Lifeforms took effect. It would seem it pertains to a creature that is kept entirely apart from the list of lifeforms -- so it remains disabled even now.
  131. This Contract displays traces of life; it shrieks, squirms, twists and is perpetually stunned into a state of horror.
  132. It would seem that there are torments so vile and grotesque that even the harsher Masters could not allow to continue. This Contract holds the knowledge for this gruesome act, and its state of everlasting horror stands as a warning to any heartless, monstruous Master who would allow it manifest in the Labyrinth.
  133. The Labyrinth can spawn a specific type of shapeless entity at the Master's command that will seek Asterion and defile his body. This entity will grow as a parasite inside him, like maggots under a man's skin, eventually bursting out as child-like, corrupted minotaur monstrosities.
  134. This gruesome entity was designed by a Master but was kept outlawed by all those who followed. He made it so this entity would generate spawn made halfway of Asterion's lineage, and halfway of another entity's lineage -- he chose to assign it to
  135. Asterion could withstand the pain and discomfort, but seeing the mindless, violent creatures that sprung from him nearly destroyed his mind.
  136.  
  137. "With this Contract I bring into existence an entity of my own creation. I dub it 'The Maggot.'
  138. It spawns upon the Master's command and burrows itself under Asterion's skin. It feeds off the prisoner and grows into childhood, until it bursts from the Prisoner's body.
  139. The resulting creature is halfway made of the Prisoner's lineage.
  140. It is halfway fashioned off 'Athena's Sprawling Madness.'
  141. The resulting creatures, in turn, can reinfect the Prisoner with yet more Maggots.
  142. May the spawn of the Prisoner be imbued with the greatest malice and joy for torture. Whatever soul they could have had, let it be corrupted from inception.
  143. This is my act of worship to Athena."
  144.  
  145. The Contract forbidding The Maggot from spawning is amendable. So is the Contract setting the parameters for The Maggot itself.
  146.  
  147. 16.
  148. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  149. There were those who defended Asterion but their voices were brought low.
  150. Among the Gods of Greece meekness was among the greatest flaws and no favor of Poseidon could save Asterion. This was not aided by Athena's growing influence.
  151. Asterion's sentence of damnation is for eternity.
  152.  
  153. 17.
  154. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  155. There was a mythical creature -- not a God -- who on his own lobbied in favor of Asterion.
  156. Geryon was a red monster living in a red land tending to his red cattle. Herakles, the mythical hero, had the killing of Geryon and the stealing of his cattle as one of his labors.
  157. With an arrow dipped in hydra poison the warrior parted Geryon's skull. The monster's neck leaned at an odd, like a poppy when it shames itself in a whip of nude breeze.
  158. It would seem Asterion and Geryon were housed around each other during Asterion's trial and found themselves kindred spirits -- both murdered by those greek heroes, both gifted with a kind disposition.
  159. Perhaps Asterion knew of Geryon's friendship. But Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right. He wouldn't know that Geryon's friendship made him challenge the gods.
  160.  
  161.  
  162.  
  163. TRIAL TRANSCRIPTS
  164.  
  165.  
  166. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  167. Why would a God offer mercy to a hybrid monstrosity whose meekness brought shame to the land of Crete? One would believe Asterion was abandoned by all.
  168. This fragment of the trial, however, tells a different tale.
  169. Poseidon granted the Cretan Bull to King Minos, who sworn to sacrifice it in the God's honor. He broke his oath and this lead to the birth of Asterion. The Cretan Bull was killed by Theseus and sacrificed to Athena. Theseus would later kill Asterion as well.
  170. Poseidon stood in defense of Asterion, demanding he be returned to the sea -- to his home.
  171. Perhaps the old God had a soft spot in him for the hybrid monstrosity -- a grandfather often coddles his grandchild, after all.
  172. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  173. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Poseidon's favor.
  174. ..
  175. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  176. Athena was the mastermind behind Asterion's demise; she convinced Ariadne to lobby in favor of Asterion's exile, she granted boons upon Theseus, Asterion's killer, and ultimately used her wit to seal the minotaur's eternal damnation.
  177. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  178. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Athena's poison.
  179. ..
  180. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  181. Poseidon did not find victory in his defense of Asterion. Nonetheless he accrued enough favor to influence Asterion's final sentence.
  182. It was not truly understood why Poseidon wanted the Labyrinth to have a Master, much less one who could write and rewrite its laws and inner workings. Some saw it as Poseidon admitting defeat and throwing Asterion to the fires of human cruelty, for a Master could then design a true torture of nightmares. Others, however, saw it as Poseidon's true revenge against Athena.
  183. The Labyrinth was designed to torture Asterion but human ingenuity turned it into a haven of the forlorn.
  184. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  185. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Poseidon's influence.
  186. ..
  187. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed with the Contracts.
  188. Poseidon summoned a witness to testify in Asterion's favor; his mother, Pasiphae.
  189. She allowed Asterion's exile to the labyrinth where Theseus took his life. But upon his untimely death she fell into grief for the loss of her son, blaming herself, and could not care less that his meekness could bring disgrace to Crete.
  190. How can a mother's love compare against the Gods' iron fists? Pasiphae's love came too late to save her child. Still, she tried and was willing to face the Gods for it.
  191. When speaking about Asterion's kindness she challenged the gods themselves, alleging that meekness ought not be a flaw deserving of the greatest punishment.
  192. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  193. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Pasiphae's love.
  194. ..
  195. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed with the Contracts.
  196. Theseus, the man who killed Asterion, descended distantly from Poseidon himself.
  197. Killings were commonplace in Ancient Greece, it was a time of intense bloodshed.
  198. Poseidon could not fault Theseus for spilling blood, but would not stand for Asterion's eternal damnation.
  199. Theseus was brought as a witness. He held no ill word for Asterion, but had much to say about his traitorous sister Ariadne.
  200. One could speculate that Theseus grew to regret his actions.
  201. When asked why Asterion chose to give his life he said that "The hybrid had no reason to live for, abandoned by his family and exiled for life to the labyrinth. I would grant him mercy, an end to his loneliness. Were I in his place perhaps I would have asked him to behead me."
  202. The Gods could not fathom or accept the human mind, the frailties of the heart, the sorrow of an abandoned child.
  203. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  204. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Theseus' testimony.
  205. ..
  206. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed with the Contracts.
  207. Hades had no appreciation for Theseus and no qualms with housing a hybrid monstrosity. During Asterion's trial -- after his death, of course -- he was housed in Hades.
  208. It would seem that Hades had no ill word towards Asterion and could not fathom why he he could not be left in his realm for eternity. Surely it was a more merciful fate than the Labyrinth.
  209. As a curiosity; it seems that Hades and Asterion, during their brief time together, became sparring partners -- and the minotaur, in this regard, was a match with a true god.
  210. It is not that case that Asterion could not fight the man who took his life; it is simply that the minotaur had no reason to live in the first place.
  211. It is ironic that Asterion found reason after death.
  212. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  213. One would expect him not to be aware of Hades' words about him. But they were friends, at least, so it is hard to tell.
  214. ..
  215. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed with the Contracts.
  216. A handful of witnesses were denied by the court; the mythical children of Poseidon attempted a defense of their distant, land-dwelling sibling, Asterion.
  217. It is unwise to let into the Hotel beings who might inform the Gods of Asterion's safety. But if the bonds of family are still to be appreciated the distant offspring of Poseidon might harbor still favor towards the minotaur.
  218. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  219. Unless he's read this document he would not know of his distant kin's favor.
  220. ..
  221. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  222. Poseidon did not find victory in his defense of Asterion. Nonetheless he accrued enough favor to influence Asterion's final sentence.
  223. It was Poseidon's demand that Asterion be exiled in a Hub Realm instead of a Low-Level Realm.
  224. The distinction between those two is not made clear in this excerpt.
  225. Poseidon also had it so other people could exiled, like Asterion, to the Labyrinth. But none ever were.
  226. Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right.
  227. Unless he's read this document he would not know of Poseidon's incomprehensible choices.
  228. ..
  229. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  230. Dyonisus provides the wine of the Labyrinth. It was his hope it would bring Asterion some mercy from his torments, but it was repurposed into a tool of torture. Should Asterion's body be so thoroughly mangled he could no longer feel pain, the wine would reshape him back to order.
  231. Dyonisus is no stranger to the plight of hybrid monstrosities and had sympathy for the minotaur.
  232. It is said a satyr once was allowed into the Hotel and swore he'd snitch of the Labyrinth's corruption. But the Gods never came, nor did the satyr return to the Labyrinth.
  233. Perhaps Dyonisus' touch lingers in Asterion's favor.
  234. ..
  235. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  236. There were those who defended Asterion but their voices were brought low.
  237. Among the Gods of Greece meekness was among the greatest flaws and no favor of Poseidon could save Asterion. This was not aided by Athena's growing influence.
  238. Asterion's sentence of damnation is for eternity.
  239. ..
  240. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  241. There was a mythical creature -- not a God -- who on his own lobbied in favor of Asterion.
  242. Geryon was a red monster living in a red land tending to his red cattle. Herakles, the mythical hero, had the killing of Geryon and the stealing of his cattle as one of his labors.
  243. With an arrow dipped in hydra poison the warrior parted Geryon's skull. The monster's neck leaned at an odd, like a poppy when it shames itself in a whip of nude breeze.
  244. It would seem Asterion and Geryon were housed around each other during Asterion's trial and found themselves kindred spirits -- both murdered by those greek heroes, both gifted with a kind disposition.
  245. Perhaps Asterion knew of Geryon's friendship. But Asterion was not present during his trial; the Gods offer no such right. He wouldn't know that Geryon's friendship made him challenge the gods.
  246. ..
  247. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  248. The god Hermes is known to favor mankind over his own divine kin.
  249. Asterion was a hybrid, distantly related to Poseidon but mostly fashioned out of mortal blood. When the minotaur was beheaded it was not the god's ichor that burst forth.
  250. Defending Asterion came naturally for Hermes, even if he had no stake in the matter. Some would say, however, that he took pity on the half-breed for he was much like Hermes' son, Pan.
  251. Athena won the trial and picked Asterion's sentence. Poseidon with his stand set the terms that would allow for the Labyrinth's exploitation. Hermes and Hephaestus crafted the Labyrinth's workings.
  252. The ease with which the Contracts can be exploited is Hermes' design.
  253. ..
  254. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  255. Athena's vendetta against Asterion was purely political.
  256. The minotaur stood officially as a symbol of Crete's might. He had no trace of bloodlust in him, despite his extensive skill in combat and gargantuan strength.
  257. Butchering Crete's holy symbol was a strategic move in securing the future of Athens' glory.
  258. Sending the hybrid into eternal damnation was the final twist of the knife.
  259. Athena's strategic talent is, after all, famous. She never settled for anything other than total victory.
  260. ..
  261. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  262. Hephaestus did not care for the gods' ceremonies and pompous rituals, neither did he attend them. As such he had no involvement whatsoever with Asterion's trial.
  263. Nonetheless Hermes asked for his assistance, and he complied.
  264. Hephaestus left a tool box in the Labyrinth and built its Mathematical foundation himself. It says here he enjoyed this effort; he added an element of playfulness to his creation.
  265. ..
  266. A fragment of the transcript of Asterion's trial; eaten away by time, largely unreadable, somehow mixed within the Contracts.
  267. Theseus was the man who slayed the minotaur of Crete. Asterion and his executioner, however, bore no ill will towards each other.
  268. Theseus was called to add an element of his own to the Labyrinth, alongside Hermes and Hephaestus. With Hephaestus' guidance he chose to bless it with human ingenuity, and so it became possible for the Labyrinth to incorporate human advancements into itself.
  269. God made man, fated to die, and man crafted mechanisms which would outlive him.
  270. ..
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