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  1. ------Context------
  2. The gods are they who came to earth |NL|And set the seas ablaze with gold.
  3. -----Generated-----
  4. ain't they cool, ain' cries they?
  5. That men should be contented with what they have? hark, git an answer, as folks holler.
  6. One cry from the savage beast sa's worth a song. one cry from the brave deer an' her darling.
  7. Would ye ask the gods how ye doin' in hell? say, 'cause we're alway sighing for a sign: ye see our sins are many
  8. and blame us if we dare ask 'em any more.'
  9. Then let a man come forth from hell, he's long overdue;
  10. let him come forth, he's nearly at the end of his days.
  11. They promised him a wife, he promised her a home, they promised him a wife
  12. in return, but ye swore you'd get your money back.'
  13. So says the god, nay, but hear him out. here's proof--the lamb: 'twas he, not she, who begged.
  14. Then let the man come forth. say, did ye see his wife? yea, she was hers, an' who is he?
  15. 'Cause he's a god.'
  16. They'll tell you how they did it, ye ha' to hear it from them, ye ha' to see.'
  17. Well, I'll tell you how they did it, ye ha' to hear it from them, ye ha' to see.
  18. They are busy now with their gods, ye know, busy with their gold,
  19. while we sit and grin at them, while they're busy on our backs.
  20. Well, I guess ye'll be back for some more, ye see; ye ha' to wait a while yet.'
  21. 'Well, I'll wait a bit yet.'
  22. 'Poor fellow.'
  23.  
  24.  
  25. ------Context------
  26. "The New York Movie", by William Collins|NL|
  27. -----Generated-----
  28. by E. Tracy Grinnell [Living, The Body, Time & Brevity, Nature, Summer, Arts & Sciences, Photography & Film]
  29. darkness enters me
  30. leaving its traces
  31.  
  32. in my underwear
  33.  
  34. and in my collar
  35.  
  36. I sleep alone
  37. thinking of the few lights left
  38.  
  39. on this block
  40. that could possibly be the last
  41.  
  42. ones to come on tonight
  43.  
  44. and the last lights on
  45.  
  46. the city tonight
  47.  
  48. will be the last ones
  49.  
  50. to go
  51.  
  52. and I will be looking
  53.  
  54. for a cab
  55.  
  56. to take me somewhere
  57.  
  58. and i will be happy
  59.  
  60. and there will be lights
  61.  
  62. on the foodcarts
  63.  
  64. and people will walk
  65.  
  66. in the lights of the city
  67.  
  68. and their eyes
  69.  
  70. will be lit up
  71.  
  72. and they will know
  73.  
  74. that they came
  75.  
  76. to the end of the world
  77.  
  78. and not
  79.  
  80. in the ways
  81.  
  82. that god
  83.  
  84. might have intended
  85.  
  86. that we be loved
  87.  
  88. despite the flaws
  89.  
  90. in our hearts
  91.  
  92. and our mouths
  93.  
  94. with the taste of the word
  95.  
  96. that makes it difficult
  97.  
  98. to waddle
  99.  
  100. and to run
  101.  
  102. i am the man
  103.  
  104. on the bus
  105.  
  106. moving
  107.  
  108. to get off
  109.  
  110. the damn train
  111.  
  112. and to get off
  113.  
  114. the damn smoke
  115.  
  116. that’s coming
  117.  
  118. and i am its hero
  119.  
  120. the real her
  121.  
  122.  
  123. ------Context------
  124. Who alive can say,|NL|‘Thou art no Poet—may’st not tell thy dreams?’”|NL|
  125. -----Generated-----
  126. is one of them
  127. that said (and it is a truth)
  128. I must not tell my dreams.
  129. The stars and the moon and the stars
  130. shall not know my dreams,
  131. those stars and the moon and the stars
  132. shall not know my dreams.
  133. The angels, not I,
  134. shall we not share my dreams?
  135. In the morning when I arise,
  136. I will not tell my dreams.
  137. They are too deep for speech,
  138. that do not reach the light;
  139. and in the night, when I rise,
  140. they will not know my dreams.
  141. I will tell them—but they will not hear,
  142. they will not dream of my dreams.
  143. I have told them, and they will not hear,
  144. that I cannot tell my dreams—
  145. that I live, and love, and sing,
  146. and work, and wait, and look up,
  147. and know them, and believe them,
  148. and be amazed
  149. that I do know my dreams.
  150.  
  151.  
  152. ------Context------
  153.  
  154. -----Generated-----
  155. "Daisies", by Rachel Zucker [Living, Infancy, Arts & Sciences, Language & Linguistics]
  156. I speak to you, who in a minute
  157. will be weaning from a man, the man
  158. said. I speak to you, saying I
  159. feel sorry for you. He laughed and shook
  160. his head. I stand by the window
  161. watching the snow come down
  162. like another story. In another language
  163. I would speak to you, saying you are
  164. a baby, I have lice all over my body.
  165. They are trying to destroy me, you see
  166. the pictures I have made of myself.
  167. I’m trying to lick your lips. You say nothing,
  168. but I know you want to, so I speak.
  169. You are a baby and I am a man,
  170. so you say, Fear not, and I say, No.
  171. I am comforted by your words, these wooden words
  172. you have given me. And I wonder, now,
  173. what country is it that you inhabit? Like the woman
  174. who lives next door. If you could just open the door
  175. and walk right into it. She has a small purse
  176. of coins for you, and when you open it, tiny glittering
  177. change falls out. I will not touch it.
  178.  
  179. ------Context------
  180. The gods are they who came to earth |NL|And set the seas ablaze with gold.
  181. -----Generated-----
  182. And when men cried aloud for fire,
  183. And the great gods bade them strike the earth with those sceptres, then
  184. Then down from heaven ascended in a great hymn they called:
  185. "O world-wide thou shalt not poison our fairest,
  186. Nor our gayest make thy fire to consume our foes:
  187. O mighty god, whose mighty arm has slain all,
  188. Whose mighty mighty soul hath not found a bride,
  189. Yet for thy sake didst thou sacrifice thyself.
  190. Forgive them their trespasses and blot out their sin,
  191. And while they bleed let thy blood be on their bones.
  192. For gods are they who came to set the world on fire,
  193. And trampled the lives of men in their ire,
  194. And scattred the souls of men in their hate.
  195. And now with a flood of golden fire they return,
  196. And to the gates of hell they will convey them;
  197. And the eagles and the vultures are their meal,
  198. And the demons are their lords.
  199.  
  200.  
  201. ------Context------
  202. "The New York Movie", by William Collins|NL|
  203. -----Generated-----
  204. by simone pellar
  205. unadorned by speech,
  206. the new york movie
  207. stars in love with
  208. long island’s night
  209.  
  210. james brown
  211. soap dribbles across
  212. a smooth surface
  213. like melted crayons
  214.  
  215. leaf shadows
  216. blurring text
  217. asleep in a box
  218.  
  219. she’s just blinked
  220. hilariously happy
  221. at the bartender
  222. in the new york movie
  223. she didn’t even know
  224. she was in love
  225.  
  226. as if new york city
  227. were a book
  228. or a woman
  229. as if she could choose
  230. a corner of the earth
  231. to put a cherry
  232. on her tongue
  233.  
  234. she places her hand
  235. on the woman’s
  236. chin, fingers
  237. that cradle
  238. a baby—
  239. or a pillbox hat.
  240. she places her hand
  241. on the woman’s
  242. shoulder, her
  243. arms are pressed to her
  244. shoulder, her
  245. eyes are pressed to her
  246.  
  247. she’s worried about
  248. her husband’s job
  249. that leaves her
  250. unable to sleep
  251. and her lover
  252. has left
  253.  
  254. she is absolutely
  255. in love with her new
  256. furnishings:
  257. a set of blue-
  258. green curtains
  259. that hang
  260. over the bed
  261.  
  262. she hears footsteps
  263. in the next room
  264. & a man
  265. in the next bed
  266.  
  267. she lies about
  268. in a bed
  269. without any
  270. movie lights on
  271.  
  272.  
  273. ------Context------
  274. Who alive can say,|NL|‘Thou art no Poet—may’st not tell thy dreams?’”|NL|
  275. -----Generated-----
  276. "I know not of an end,” I said to him,
  277. “But see here what has become of them:
  278. the merry winds blow sweet to the weary,
  279. the birds sit singing, the shadows fall.
  280. I have heard them in the silence speak,
  281. murmuring by the cypress, ’tis day, indeed;
  282. but thou canst not—shall I give the field,
  283. or leave my child asleep?’
  284. —I brought him to his mother, on a sabbath-day,
  285. and told him to bring up his children,
  286. and he must not be afraid; for in the Bible,
  287. so far as he lives, it is said, that he,
  288. if he eats the manna, it is said he
  289. does as the parable of the wise.
  290. “Of man’s delights what hath he now to give?
  291. In the night, in the time of trouble,
  292. he rests; nor knows he wakes again.”
  293. She left the child and mother, and went to bed,
  294. and threw the blanket round her head. Then
  295. she bade him rise. The next morning she did arise,
  296. and sat up with a smile on her lips. ‘Why,
  297. Art thou no poet?’ said she, ‘we dream
  298. and dream.’ Then he awoke; yet we dreamed again,
  299. and still the same dream.
  300. I told the dream to no one, but they could not hear,
  301. because they were asleep.’
  302. When she arose, the shadows had all gone,
  303. and she arose, but could not speak or hear;
  304. it seemed that she had not been there.
  305. Her mother was singing in the next room,
  306. and listening there, she saw a form,
  307. a form she had not seen before,
  308. a form that was not in a room;
  309. but the woman saw him. When she
  310.  
  311.  
  312. ------Context------
  313.  
  314. -----Generated-----
  315. "Over My Head", by Sophie Cabot Black [Living, Life Choices, Nature, Animals, Weather]
  316. It is just as well. I can make do with the fact that the
  317. ground is so much more enclosed
  318. than my surrounding senses would suggest.
  319. The wind is only a nuisance;
  320. I don't live in a vacuum.
  321. The cockroaches are a nuisance;
  322. so am I.
  323. There is a way to reduce
  324. the number of incidents
  325. to a manageable number,
  326. and yet, with the wind,
  327. I'd like to experience,
  328. with the least inconvenience,
  329. life as it is for me.
  330.  
  331. ------Context------
  332. The gods are they who came to earth |NL|And set the seas ablaze with gold.
  333. -----Generated-----
  334.  
  335. They smil'd to see a swarm of flies
  336. in the evening sky.
  337. And a vulture, swift in its flight,
  338. who crept before the dawn.
  339. The gods are those who came to earth
  340. and set the world a-flying.
  341. They smil'd to see a man in his fresh array,
  342. and a lamb on his shoulder.
  343. The gods are they who came to earth
  344. and set the world a-flying.
  345. They smil'd to see a man in his fresh array
  346. and a lamb on his shoulder.
  347. The gods are they who came to earth, they who came,
  348. and a vulture crept before the dawn.
  349. They smil'd to see a man in his fresh array
  350. and a lamb on his shoulder.
  351. And a bird flew before the dawn
  352. and a vulture alighted on his head.
  353. The gods are they who came to earth
  354. and set the world a-flying.
  355.  
  356.  
  357. ------Context------
  358. "The New York Movie", by William Collins|NL|
  359. -----Generated-----
  360. [
  361. ]
  362. 1
  363.  
  364. i will not
  365.  
  366. talk about the
  367.  
  368. pigeons
  369.  
  370. because they
  371.  
  372. are not
  373.  
  374. white
  375.  
  376. 2
  377.  
  378. i will not
  379.  
  380. talk
  381.  
  382. about the pigeons
  383.  
  384. because they
  385.  
  386. are not
  387.  
  388. white
  389.  
  390. 3
  391.  
  392. i will not
  393.  
  394. think about the pigeons
  395.  
  396. because i am
  397.  
  398. not
  399.  
  400. thinking about
  401.  
  402. anything
  403.  
  404. 4
  405.  
  406. the new york movie
  407.  
  408. is about
  409.  
  410. james brown
  411.  
  412. same
  413.  
  414. as the other
  415.  
  416. 3
  417.  
  418. charlton hepburn
  419.  
  420. jfk
  421.  
  422. as the other
  423.  
  424. 3
  425.  
  426. charlton hepburn
  427.  
  428. same
  429.  
  430. as the other
  431.  
  432. 4
  433.  
  434. he loves tiffany
  435.  
  436. she loves roosevelt
  437.  
  438. as the other
  439.  
  440. 5
  441.  
  442. she loves charlton
  443.  
  444. he loves
  445.  
  446. cherry
  447.  
  448. james brown
  449.  
  450. 4
  451.  
  452. i love harry dick
  453.  
  454. the other
  455.  
  456. 3
  457.  
  458. i love harry
  459.  
  460. he loves tiffany
  461.  
  462. she loves
  463.  
  464. chris brown
  465.  
  466. 6
  467.  
  468. i love harry
  469.  
  470. 7
  471.  
  472. the
  473.  
  474.  
  475. ------Context------
  476. Who alive can say,|NL|‘Thou art no Poet—may’st not tell thy dreams?’”|NL|
  477. -----Generated-----
  478. on a morning that he’s gone to the inn
  479. I hear a door open, slowly, and then I turn
  480. and see a woman, an old woman, in a velvet slip,
  481. her hair unbound and her face turned to the window,
  482. a light on the table, and her eyes looking at something in the door.
  483.  
  484. with a thousand beauties—nothing fairer than that,
  485. nothing more simple than that—in a passion that’s wild,
  486. a love so passionate, that makes you turn and go
  487. from her, and she is there, as you awoke,
  488. to find you were not there?
  489.  
  490. lilacs
  491.  
  492. blooms of the forest
  493.  
  494. ivy-covered sallows
  495.  
  496. no brighter than your eyes
  497.  
  498. ivy-grown,
  499.  
  500. ivy-long-stemmed lily-white
  501.  
  502. ah!
  503.  
  504. they are there
  505.  
  506. ivy-stemmed lily-white
  507.  
  508. they are there
  509.  
  510. ivy-long-stemmed lily-white
  511.  
  512. they are there
  513.  
  514. ivy-grown
  515.  
  516. ivy-grown
  517.  
  518. ivy-long-stemmed
  519.  
  520. they are there
  521.  
  522. ivy-grown
  523.  
  524. ivy-blooms of the forest
  525.  
  526. ivy-long-stemmed
  527.  
  528. ivy-long-stemmed
  529.  
  530. ivy-rose
  531.  
  532. ivy-tall sallows
  533.  
  534. ivy-blooms
  535.  
  536. ivy-blooms
  537.  
  538. ivy-green
  539.  
  540. sprayers of the forest
  541.  
  542. ivy
  543.  
  544.  
  545. ------Context------
  546.  
  547. -----Generated-----
  548. "Brown", by Jane Hirshfield [Living, Death, Marriage & Companionship, Relationships, Family & Ancestors]
  549. The road to the funeral parlor is a steep
  550. silo, with grass stuffed between the seats.
  551. In the back, a wooden bench with a name
  552. stamped across it, and a mourning dove on its shoulder.
  553.  
  554. Those who were there, remember the thin
  555. black wooden chairs. The wooden benches
  556. and the chimney, drawn up around the legs
  557. of the stairwell, were pressed into the floor.
  558.  
  559. The walls of the conference room were high
  560. and reeking, and the blue
  561. light of the conference room shone on them.
  562. They had a clean, linoleum to their names,
  563. and faces older than their own.
  564.  
  565. It was a nice day. I found a chair
  566. on the edge of a small parking lot.
  567.  
  568. A woman came out of the bathroom
  569. and leaned against the door. She was wearing black
  570.  
  571. flannel, a long skirt, and stockings.
  572.  
  573. “Hello,” she said, “I’m back...
  574. and thank you for inviting me.”
  575.  
  576. I didn’t know what to say,
  577. and tried to think of the way they could
  578. make love in the house, the way
  579.  
  580. they could hold hands and be
  581. honest. I wondered how they could
  582. leave the room and go on living
  583.  
  584. without anyone being there.
  585. They could stay in their slips and eat
  586. the food left out for them, and know
  587.  
  588. if they were hungry. I knew
  589.  
  590. their loneliness, and so I tried
  591. to imagine being with them.
  592.  
  593. But they were not there.
  594.  
  595. ------Context------
  596. The gods are they who came to earth |NL|And set the seas ablaze with gold.
  597. -----Generated-----
  598.  
  599. gods are they who set the world a-swing, did the Romans know
  600. themselves? they who were gods who fell into the trenches at Troy?
  601. the gods are they who came to the shore of a fine bay
  602. and made a city high of gold? did the Greeks see on their way
  603. to the gods their chariots full of gold? did the gods see in our eyes
  604. the weeping eye of Pluto? did he see the land where the little folk
  605. with their wooden sandals and their crooked talons live? did they see in our eyes
  606. the gods who are they who rule in the place of kings? did the gods
  607. see our young men, our sons? did they see the gods on their way to Troy?
  608. the gods are they who sowed the seed and reap the harvest? did the gods see
  609. in our eyes their own bright children? did they see the dust
  610. we trampled? did they see the blood on their hands? did they see
  611. in our eyes their own bright children? did they see the dust
  612. we trampled? did they see? did they see? did the gods see
  613. in our eyes their own bright children? did they see?
  614.  
  615.  
  616. ------Context------
  617. "The New York Movie", by William Collins|NL|
  618. -----Generated-----
  619. one of the most famous of cinematic forms,
  620. whose name has become a household word
  621. is now playing in a new york city movie
  622. which has become a worldwide phenomenon,
  623. attracting millions of tourists each year
  624. who flock to see this picture
  625. and, hoping to catch a glimpse of the future,
  626. are thus confronted with a myriad of reality-based characters
  627. who do not believe in fiction
  628. and are therefore, in all likelihood,
  629. completely unaware of what is taking place
  630. on the silver screen:
  631. the future which is a movie
  632. played on a gilded copy of The New York Movie,
  633. which has not yet been released in any theatres.
  634. the year is 2001
  635. and, for all its monumental and dazzling potential,
  636. is still an unreleased movie
  637. that is gaining ground rapidly,
  638. as more and more people discover
  639. it isn’t revolution but a new mode of entertainment,
  640. a new mode of cheerleading,
  641. which has overtaken even cinematic standards.
  642. the wave of tourists,
  643. not deterred by the enormous price tag,
  644. is eager to see the movie and get out of the city;
  645. in fact, the city has opened a whole new vista,
  646. the vista that is totally unlocked.
  647. in fact, the entire city has been swept off
  648. like a glass of cheap champagne, thrown
  649. in the face of a cliff or a stadium,
  650. and it’s as if the movie had never been
  651. released and, therefore, never will be.
  652. the city has been ruined and rebuilt
  653. completely over the course of several decades,
  654. during which the inhabitants have forgotten
  655. or completely forgotten that it once existed.
  656. the city is innumerable
  657. like the characters in the movie,
  658. each one unique, with his or her own quirks and habits,
  659. his own quirks and habits,
  660. like a
  661.  
  662.  
  663. ------Context------
  664. Who alive can say,|NL|‘Thou art no Poet—may’st not tell thy dreams?’”|NL|
  665. -----Generated-----
  666. — Aristotle
  667.  
  668. Not in thy dream we all,
  669. Though oft in thought we have,
  670. Smiles and thy hand is in my mouth
  671. The draught that will not let me be
  672. Nor thou deem’st me a poet?
  673.  
  674. I dream, that from a young woman
  675. Shall a rosy morning gleam,
  676. The smile of the red, red rose,
  677. The laughter of the boy,
  678. The arms of the maiden, ’neath her hair,
  679. Something of the world and of me
  680. Too strange to believe.
  681.  
  682. A dream, ah dream, it will not be
  683. Until the heav’ns have brought me sight
  684. Of such a dawn as thyself,
  685. When from the lonely shore
  686. Of youth to the city of life
  687. He hies, and turns aside;
  688. To stand there, amidst the roar
  689. Of savage beasts and madmen,
  690. Far from the roar,
  691. To see my swart, wintry arms,
  692. And my frozen, frozen feet,
  693. And the weary halting eyes,
  694. Pleading o’er the frozen stream,
  695. For my dead love to come;
  696.  
  697. But she, ah she is not here;
  698. No more, no more is she;
  699. And I, no more, no more am I.
  700.  
  701. Ah! It will not be
  702. That I writ no more,
  703. I cannot blame nor praise
  704. Without a cause or friend;
  705. And yet, to be writ,
  706. Is not enough.
  707.  
  708. But yet, we know the gloom
  709. Of each sad, gloomy head;
  710. We know how deep the groan
  711. Of the dying, the dying,
  712. Who
  713.  
  714.  
  715. ------Context------
  716.  
  717. -----Generated-----
  718. "Song", by Bill Knott [Nature, Animals, Religion, The Spiritual]
  719. Nobody saw my uncle
  720.  
  721. Bear. Nobody knew when
  722.  
  723. To fly. Nobody knew
  724.  
  725. The hawk eared the caged bird.
  726.  
  727. In the raw moon’s eye
  728.  
  729. Berries exploded.
  730.  
  731. In that other world
  732.  
  733. Crows built their houses.
  734.  
  735. Another world
  736.  
  737. Wondered at the sapphire sky.
  738.  
  739. Painted everywhere
  740.  
  741. Wondered at the speed of light.
  742.  
  743. The speed of sound.
  744.  
  745. What is there to say.
  746.  
  747. From hawk to hawk
  748.  
  749. Eagle, from hawk to dove,
  750.  
  751. Lark from linnet, from crow to crow.
  752.  
  753. The red deer, the crows of the hawk.
  754.  
  755. Atta boy, the quest
  756.  
  757. To know if a soul could drown.
  758.  
  759. In that other world
  760.  
  761. Hunting, divining,
  762.  
  763. The way a man betrays his sister.
  764.  
  765. In that other world
  766.  
  767. Pale where the grasses bend to the ground,
  768.  
  769. Badgers suck at a stone—
  770.  
  771. The way a man is sucked
  772.  
  773. When he runs from his wife—
  774.  
  775. How that dog leaps away.
  776.  
  777. There is something in a man’s cry
  778.  
  779. That makes him think he is a bird.
  780.  
  781. The way a man cries out,
  782.  
  783. “Get up, get up!”
  784.  
  785. The way a man cries out,
  786. |
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