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  1. [23:11] <@MattBo> TU 1
  2. 01[23:11] <vcuEvan> i think that's everyone
  3. [23:11] <sinan> morgoth is the only one
  4. [23:11] <touchpack> gogogo
  5. [23:11] <@MattBo> 1. In a Mughal miniature, Jahangir uses one of these objects as a throne while scorning James I of England
  6. 02[23:11] * morgoth (Mibbit@cloak-CECD0B05.hsd1.mi.comcast.net) Quit (Quit: http://www.mibbit.com ajax IRC Client)
  7. [23:11] <@MattBo> for a Sufi mystic
  8. [23:11] <@MattBo> One of these items lies unobtrusively on a table in between four Venetian painters playing
  9. [23:12] <@MattBo> as a string quartet in Veronese’s Marriage at Cana. In the bottom right corner of A Dance to the Music
  10. [23:12] <@MattBo> of Time, a putto is holding one of these items. In another painting, one of these objects is on the back of a
  11. [23:12] <@MattBo> muscular, bald (*)  winged man who extends his right arm to draw back an ultramarine curtain. One of these
  12. [23:12] <magin> buzz
  13. [23:12] <@MattBo> objects is held up by a haggard creature wearing a crown interwoven with snakes in Albrecht Durer’s Knight, Death,
  14. [23:12] <@MattBo> Magin
  15. [23:13] <magin> an hourglass?
  16. [23:13] <@MattBo> 10
  17. 01[23:13] <vcuEvan> nice
  18. [23:13] <ThisIsMyUsername> aha
  19. 01[23:13] <vcuEvan> how do we direct answers?
  20. [23:13] <touchpack> awesome
  21. [23:13] <ThisIsMyUsername> that makes a lot of sense
  22. [23:13] <Stephen> that was a good idea
  23. 01[23:13] <vcuEvan> on bonuses
  24. [23:13] <setht> take the first wrong thing they say and the first right thing we say, I figure
  25. [23:13] <magin> sounds good
  26. [23:13] <Stephen> how about we preface it with "answer:"
  27. [23:13] <@MattBo> Jonathan should do that, yes
  28. [23:13] <ThisIsMyUsername> makes sense
  29. 01[23:13] <vcuEvan> ok
  30. [23:14] <@MattBo> They can be defined as an abelian group M with a ring homomorphism from R to the endomorphism ring of M.  For 10 points each:
  31. [23:15] <magin> am I lagging?
  32. [23:15] <Stephen> am i still connected
  33. [23:15] <@MattBo> no, Sinan is just asking me a question
  34. [23:15] <touchpack> i haven't seen anything
  35. [23:15] <touchpack> after the leadin
  36. [23:15] <ThisIsMyUsername> you're both still connected
  37. [23:15] <@MattBo> They can be defined as an abelian group M with a ring homomorphism from R to the endomorphism ring of M.  For 10 points each:
  38. [23:15] <@MattBo> urgh
  39. [23:15] <@MattBo> [10] Name these mathematical objects in which the additive abelian group M is acted upon by R such that the map is associative and distributive
  40. [23:15] <touchpack> i think it's a vector space
  41. [23:15] <magin> I trust you
  42. 01[23:15] <vcuEvan> sounds good
  43. [23:15] <Stephen> ok sure
  44. [23:15] <touchpack> answer: vector space
  45. [23:15] <@MattBo> I'll prompt you
  46. [23:16] <touchpack> uhhhhh
  47. [23:16] <@MattBo> or antiprm
  48. [23:16] <@MattBo> *prompt
  49. [23:16] <@MattBo> answer?
  50. [23:16] <@MattBo> time
  51. [23:16] <@MattBo> it's a module
  52. [23:16] <@MattBo> [10] When the underlying ring is a field, M instead becomes one of these objects.  Complete normed ones are known as Banach spaces, while one that also has a bilinear product is an algebra over a field.
  53. [23:16] <touchpack> ok
  54. [23:16] <touchpack> this is a vector space then
  55. [23:16] <@MattBo> answer?
  56. [23:16] <touchpack> vector space again
  57. [23:17] <@MattBo> yes
  58. [23:17] <@MattBo> [10] When the underlying ring is a field, M instead becomes one of these objects.  Complete normed ones are known as Banach spaces, while one that also has a bilinear product is an algebra over a field.
  59. [23:17] <@MattBo> do the answer thing though when you can
  60. [23:17] <Stephen> you just gave us that one
  61. [23:17] <@MattBo> oops
  62. [23:17] <magin> what a slow moderator
  63. [23:17] <@MattBo> indeed
  64. [23:17] <@MattBo> [10] The structure theorem for finitely generated modules over one of these objects states that if R is one of these and M is a finitely generated R-module, then M is isomorphic to the direct sum of finitely many cyclic modules.  These objects are Dedekind domains that are also unique factorization domains.
  65. [23:17] <@MattBo> there we go, correctly pasted
  66. [23:18] <@MattBo> answer?
  67. [23:18] <magin> any ideas, billy?
  68. [23:18] <touchpack> well this is mostly gibberish to me
  69. [23:18] <Stephen> oh well
  70. [23:18] <@MattBo> ok, these are principle ideal domains
  71. [23:18] <@MattBo> you get 10
  72. 03[23:18] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 20 Seth: 0'
  73. [23:18] <@MattBo> TU
  74. [23:18] <@MattBo> [10] The structure theorem for finitely generated modules over one of these objects states that if R is one of these and M is a finitely generated R-module, then M is isomorphic to the direct sum of finitely many cyclic modules.  These objects are Dedekind domains that are also unique factorization domains.
  75. [23:18] <@MattBo> gaahh
  76. [23:18] <Stephen> lol
  77. [23:18] <ThisIsMyUsername> haha
  78. [23:19] <touchpack> ctrl-C loses again
  79. [23:19] <@MattBo> Slug testing of these objects is very quick and inexpensive, but only tests a small area
  80. [23:19] <@MattBo> of one and may be best used in poorly transmissive conditions. Th
  81. [23:20] <@MattBo> The Hantush-Thomas method can often be used to calculate
  82. [23:20] <@MattBo> characteristics of these objects when their values of Kh and Kv differ;
  83. [23:21] <@MattBo> ; that difference defines the anisotropic type
  84. [23:21] <@MattBo> ; that difference defines the anisotropic type
  85. [23:21] <@MattBo> this sucks
  86. [23:21] <touchpack> are you trying to copy from pdf?
  87. [23:21] <@MattBo> no
  88. [23:21] <@MattBo> and that's weird
  89. [23:21] <@MattBo> which is often found in the fractured rock variety of these objects.
  90. [23:22] <@MattBo> A Ghyben-Herzberg lens occurs when these
  91. [23:22] <@MattBo> objects are on islands
  92. [23:23] <@MattBo> when these objects are on islands, and an equation named for those two men is used to calculate the level
  93. [23:23] <@MattBo> of(*) intrusion into one of these objects. Perched ones are usually small, while confined ones often border a clay or
  94. [23:23] <setht> buzz
  95. [23:23] <@MattBo> seth
  96. [23:23] <setht> water tables
  97. [23:23] <@MattBo> I'll prompt?
  98. [23:23] <setht> aquifers
  99. [23:24] <@MattBo> 10
  100. [23:24] <@MattBo> 2. This form is exemplified by A Change of Heart and Passing Time, both by Michel Butor. For 10 points each:
  101. [23:24] <ThisIsMyUsername> I'm glad that the timestamp confirms that science tossups take as long as I've always suspected they do
  102. [23:24] <@MattBo> haha
  103. 01[23:24] <vcuEvan> heh
  104. [23:24] <@MattBo> [10] Name this literary form developed in 1950’s France that is characterized by confusion of genre and a lack of
  105. [23:24] <@MattBo> metaphorical narrative description. It was pioneered by the author of In the Labyrinth and Jealousy.
  106. [23:24] <ThisIsMyUsername> this is nouveau roman
  107. [23:24] <ThisIsMyUsername> I'm pretty sure
  108. [23:24] <@MattBo> this computer just sucks I guess
  109. [23:24] <setht> fine by me
  110. [23:24] <ThisIsMyUsername> because that's robbe-grillet
  111. [23:24] <dendroicavirens> go for it
  112. [23:24] <selene> ok
  113. [23:24] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: nouveau roman
  114. [23:25] <@MattBo> 10
  115. [23:25] <@MattBo> [10] This author of For a New Novel helped develop the form in works like Jealousy and The Erasers. He wrote the
  116. [23:25] <@MattBo> script for Last Year in Marienbad.
  117. [23:25] <setht> go for it
  118. [23:25] <ThisIsMyUsername> that's definitely robbe-grillet
  119. [23:25] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: robbe-grillet
  120. [23:25] <@MattBo> [10] Another pioneer of the nouveau roman was this Jewish woman, the author of Golden Fruits, The Planetarium,
  121. [23:25] <ThisIsMyUsername> that's sarraute
  122. [23:25] <@MattBo> and Childhood who barely escaped execution by the Nazis during the German occupation.
  123. [23:25] <ThisIsMyUsername> the other nouveau roman person
  124. [23:25] <setht> ok
  125. [23:25] <selene> ok
  126. [23:25] <dendroicavirens> go
  127. [23:25] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: sarraute
  128. [23:25] <@MattBo> you receive 30 points
  129. [23:25] <setht> nice
  130. 03[23:25] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 20 Seth: 40'
  131. [23:25] <Stephen> good job
  132. [23:25] <ThisIsMyUsername> thanks
  133. [23:26] <@MattBo> TU
  134. [23:26] <@MattBo> 3. In a novella by this author, a coral merchant named Nissen Piczenik comes back from his first trip to the
  135. [23:26] <@MattBo> sea to find that he is losing business to a man selling celluloid beads. This author of The Leviathan created a
  136. [23:26] <@MattBo> character who has an affair with Frau Slama, who then dies in childbirth, and receives a packet of his letters
  137. [23:26] <@MattBo> to her on a visit to her widower. The protagonist of a novel by this writer leaves his crippled and mentally
  138. [23:26] <@MattBo> deficient son Menuchim behind in Europe to go to New York. That character, Mendel Singer, suffers the
  139. [23:26] <@MattBo> wrath of God before being reunited with his family.
  140. [23:27] <@MattBo> The (*) Emperor’s Tomb is a sequel to this author’s most
  141. [23:27] <@MattBo> famous novel, in which a lowly infantryman is promoted for taking a bullet for Franz Joseph during the Battle
  142. [23:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> buzz
  143. [23:27] <@MattBo> John
  144. [23:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> maybe this is Joseph Roth?
  145. [23:27] <@MattBo> 10
  146. [23:27] <Stephen> fuck
  147. [23:27] <@MattBo> 3. This family rose out of the gentry class after inheriting Caister Castle from Sir John Fastolf under questionable
  148. [23:27] <@MattBo> circumstances. For 10 points each:
  149. [23:28] <@MattBo> [10] Name this medieval English family from Norfolk. Their correspondence is the largest collection of letters
  150. [23:28] <ThisIsMyUsername> time to sit back and watch Jeff do his magic...
  151. [23:28] <@MattBo> surviving from 15th-century England and sheds light on the life of the gentry at that time.
  152. [23:28] <dendroicavirens> answer: Pastons
  153. [23:28] <@MattBo> haha
  154. [23:28] <@MattBo> [10] One of the Paston letters records what may be this epidemic, a mysterious disease that broke out six times in
  155. [23:28] <@MattBo> England in the 15th and 16th centuries. It killed Arthur, Prince of Wales.
  156. [23:28] <dendroicavirens> huh. is this the English sweating sickness?
  157. [23:28] <setht> I have nothing here
  158. [23:28] <@MattBo> is that your answer?
  159. [23:28] <selene> i got nothing
  160. [23:28] <ThisIsMyUsername> me neither
  161. [23:28] <setht> but that sounds like a fine mysterious British disease
  162. [23:28] <dendroicavirens> answer: English sweating sickness
  163. [23:28] <@MattBo> it is
  164. [23:28] <@MattBo> [10] The death of Arthur, Prince of Wales made this woman a widow. She claimed she had never slept with Arthur
  165. [23:29] <@MattBo> and married Arthur’s brother.
  166. [23:29] <dendroicavirens> answer: Catherine of Aragon
  167. [23:29] <@MattBo> 30
  168. 03[23:29] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 20 Seth: 80'
  169. [23:29] <@MattBo> TU
  170. [23:29] <@MattBo> 4. A queen of this kingdom commissioned a round, 27-layer granite tower with a square top and a window a
  171. [23:29] <@MattBo> few meters off the ground for observing stars. Another of this kingdom’s treasures is said to give the infant
  172. [23:29] <@MattBo> cry “Emille!” when struck, because a baby was melted into the bronze for a huge bell. This kingdom’s
  173. [23:29] <@MattBo> ceremonial crowns had three branch-shaped prongs and two tall prongs shaped like deer antlers, all made
  174. [23:29] <@MattBo> of gold leaf. Religious treasures from this kingdom include the Sokkuram shrine. This kingdom included the
  175. [23:30] <@MattBo> hereditary “head rank 6” caste in its
  176. [23:30] <@MattBo> (*) bone rank system
  177. [23:30] <Stephen>  buzz
  178. 01[23:30] <vcuEvan> buzz
  179. [23:30] <@MattBo> stephen
  180. [23:30] <Stephen> Silla?
  181. [23:30] <@MattBo> 10 points
  182. [23:30] <Stephen> emille?
  183. [23:30] <magin> well done
  184. [23:30] <@MattBo> 4. It was the age of low-budget music videos and bands fronted by former hairdressers. Name the following New
  185. 01[23:30] <vcuEvan> i'm 90 percent sure i read a young adult novel about the queen from the leadin when i was a kid
  186. [23:30] <@MattBo> Wave songs from descriptions of their videos for 10 points each:
  187. [23:30] <@MattBo> [10] There were so many mirrors on its set that the reflection of the camera can be seen in this A Flock of Seagulls
  188. [23:30] <@MattBo> video.  Strangely dressed women walked zombie-like towards a tinfoil-draped camera while Mike Score sang that
  189. [23:30] <@MattBo> despite doing this “all night and day/I couldn’t get away.”
  190. 01[23:30] <vcuEvan> this is like "i fly away" or something
  191. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> no
  192. [23:31] <magin> anyone know any a flock of seagulls songs?
  193. [23:31] <touchpack> i totally read that as mike sorice
  194. [23:31] <Stephen> i didnt know a flock of seagulls was real
  195. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> they're a one hit wonder
  196. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> this is their one hit
  197. [23:31] <@MattBo> answer?
  198. [23:31] <magin> say something, evan
  199. [23:31] <Stephen> yeah sorry
  200. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> answer: i fly away
  201. [23:31] <@MattBo> you just missed "I Ran"
  202. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> right
  203. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> ran
  204. [23:31] <magin> oh
  205. [23:31] <@MattBo> [10] Inspired by a 1984 movie, this song’s video featured Johann Hölzel dressed in a tuxedo while walking through
  206. [23:31] <@MattBo> a crowd from the court of Joseph II, then dressed as the title character while being carried through a biker bar.
  207. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> this is going to go poorly
  208. [23:31] <magin> rock me amadeus?
  209. [23:31] <Stephen> yeah that sounds good
  210. 01[23:31] <vcuEvan> yeah, that's probably right
  211. [23:31] <magin> does that make sense?
  212. [23:31] <touchpack> why not
  213. [23:31] <magin> answer: rock me amadeus
  214. [23:31] <@MattBo> [10] This song by Real Life shares its name with a hit by the Scorpions.  As David Sterry sings “Do you believe in
  215. [23:32] <@MattBo> heaven above/do you believe in love,” a beauty-and-the-beast pursuit plays out in this medievally-themed video.
  216. 01[23:32] <vcuEvan> i should have listened more closely to JR's cd
  217. [23:32] <magin> what are some hits by the scorpions
  218. [23:32] <magin> anyone know
  219. [23:32] <@MattBo> answer?
  220. 01[23:32] <vcuEvan> answr: rock me like a hurricane
  221. [23:32] <@MattBo> send me an angel
  222. [23:32] <@MattBo> 10
  223. 03[23:32] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 40 Seth: 80'
  224. [23:32] <@MattBo> TU
  225. [23:32] <@MattBo> 5. In a reaction synthesizing these compounds, a ketoxime reacts with an electron-deficient alkyne to
  226. [23:33] <@MattBo> generate a compound that can undergo a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement. That is the Trofimov synthesis.
  227. [23:33] <@MattBo> The reaction of two equivalents of an aldehyde and a hydrazine can form one of these compounds with
  228. [23:33] <@MattBo> substituents at the 3 and 4-positions, that is the Piloty-Robinson synthesis. The most well-known synthesis of
  229. [23:33] <@MattBo> these compounds requires one to react a primary amine with a 1,4-diketone; this is the Paal-Knorr synthesis.
  230. [23:33] <@MattBo> Although they are not pyridines, the Hantzsch synthesis of these compounds is a common way to produce them.
  231. [23:33] <touchpack> buzz
  232. [23:33] <touchpack> pyrroles
  233. [23:33] <@MattBo> 10
  234. [23:33] <Stephen> nice
  235. [23:33] <@MattBo> 5. This hero escaped a treacherously-set grassfire after his magic sword started spontaneously mowing the burning
  236. [23:33] <@MattBo> grass down. For 10 points each:
  237. [23:34] <Stephen> okuninushi i think
  238. [23:34] <@MattBo> [10] Name this hero who turns into a white bird after his death. His downfall comes after he misidentifies a
  239. [23:34] <Stephen> maybe not
  240. [23:34] <@MattBo> mountain god in boar form as a messenger of that mountain god and is slain by a hailstorm on Mount Ibuki.
  241. [23:34] <Stephen> yeah it is
  242. [23:34] <magin> go for it
  243. [23:34] <Stephen> answer: okuninushi
  244. [23:34] <@MattBo> It's Yamato-Takeru
  245. [23:34] <@MattBo> [10] Yamato-Takeru’s magic sword was this “grass-cutting sword” discovered by Susano’o in Orochi’s corpse. It is
  246. [23:34] <Stephen> oh ok nvm sorry
  247. [23:34] <@MattBo> part of the Imperial Regalia of Japan. It’s Japanese. Japan.
  248. [23:34] <Stephen> kusanagi
  249. [23:34] <touchpack> kusanagi yea
  250. [23:34] <Stephen> answer: kusanagi
  251. [23:34] <@MattBo> 10
  252. [23:34] <@MattBo> [10] In a moderately similar incident, Susano’o set a field on fire in an attempt to kill this future son-in-law of his,
  253. [23:35] <@MattBo> who was trying to marry Suseri-hime. He was the ruler of Izumo prior to Ninigi.
  254. [23:35] <Stephen> ok this is okuninushi
  255. [23:35] <Stephen> who also got hit by a flaming boar
  256. [23:35] <magin> I'm sold
  257. [23:35] <Stephen> man that's confusing
  258. [23:35] <touchpack> lol
  259. [23:35] <magin> what's with japan and flaming boars
  260. [23:35] <@MattBo> answer?
  261. [23:35] <Stephen> answer: okuninushi
  262. [23:35] <@MattBo> 20
  263. 03[23:35] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 70 Seth: 80'
  264. 01[23:35] <vcuEvan> nice
  265. [23:35] <@MattBo> TU
  266. [23:35] <@MattBo> 6. Humphrey Searle based the structure of his twelve-tone Piano Sonata on this earlier composition, and
  267. [23:35] <@MattBo> Searle also orchestrated this piece for Frederick Ashton's ballet Marguerite and Armand. A fermata on a
  268. [23:36] <@MattBo> dominant ninth chord in E minor leads unexpectedly into this work's F-sharp major Andante sostenuto
  269. [23:36] <@MattBo> section. W. S. Newman coined the term “double-function form” to describe this piece's structure. The
  270. [23:36] <ThisIsMyUsername> buzz
  271. [23:36] <@MattBo> John
  272. [23:36] <ThisIsMyUsername> is this Liszt's Piano Sonata in B minor?
  273. [23:36] <@MattBo> 15
  274. [23:36] <selene> nice buzz
  275. [23:36] <ThisIsMyUsername> thank you
  276. [23:36] <@MattBo> composer anticipated some of this work's themes in his Grand Concert-Solo, which would later become the
  277. [23:36] <@MattBo> err
  278. [23:36] <@MattBo> 6. This author wrote about Ulysses S. Grant’s death in A Few Stout Individuals and described two archaeologists
  279. [23:36] <@MattBo> who vacation in Sicily in Four Baboons Adoring the Sun. For 10 points each:
  280. [23:36] <@MattBo> [10] Name this American playwright of Gardenia and The House of Blue Leaves, who wrote another play about a
  281. [23:37] <@MattBo> black man named Paul who tricks Ouisa and Flan Kittredge into thinking he’s the son of Sidney Poitier.
  282. [23:37] <ThisIsMyUsername> guare
  283. [23:37] <@MattBo> yes
  284. [23:37] <@MattBo> [10] This aforementioned John Guare play is about how Paul’s cons serve as an indirect link between otherwise
  285. [23:37] <ThisIsMyUsername> I hadn't directed it at you yet!
  286. [23:37] <@MattBo> unrelated couples in New York.
  287. [23:37] <@MattBo> oh whoops
  288. [23:37] <ThisIsMyUsername> but this is definitely six degrees of separation
  289. 01[23:37] <vcuEvan> simon says...
  290. [23:37] <setht> sounds good
  291. [23:37] <dendroicavirens> go
  292. [23:37] <selene> yeah
  293. [23:37] <@MattBo> answer?
  294. [23:37] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: six degrees of separation
  295. [23:37] <@MattBo> [10] In Six Degrees of Separation, Paul is writing his thesis on this novel whose characters include the prostitute
  296. [23:37] <@MattBo> Sunny and her pimp Maurice.
  297. [23:37] <ThisIsMyUsername> Catcher in the Rye, I think
  298. [23:37] <setht> hey I know this one!
  299. [23:37] <setht> yeah
  300. 01[23:37] <vcuEvan> good work Seth!
  301. [23:37] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: The Catcher in the Rye
  302. 03[23:38] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 70 Seth: 125'
  303. [23:38] <Stephen> jesus stop 30ing stuff
  304. [23:38] <@MattBo> TU
  305. [23:38] <@MattBo> 7. In Islam, Muhammad claimed that this man’s wife Asiya will enter Jannah first among women, joining
  306. [23:38] <@MattBo> Mary, Khadijah, and Fatima among the four most pious women of history. Puah and Shiphrah defied this
  307. [23:38] <@MattBo> man by working “upon the stools.” In Judaic midrash, this man has a daughter named Bithiah. The theft of
  308. [23:38] <@MattBo> an item belonging to this man led to a test under his roof involving a bar of gold and a burning-hot
  309. [23:38] <@MattBo> (*) coal.
  310. [23:38] <@MattBo> picked up by a baby. This man is warned of the “finger of God,”
  311. [23:38] <Stephen> did you skip something
  312. [23:39] <@MattBo> no
  313. [23:39] <ThisIsMyUsername> the coal was picked up by a baby?
  314. 01[23:39] <vcuEvan> you must have
  315. [23:39] <@MattBo> no, the coal was picked up by a baby
  316. [23:39] <ThisIsMyUsername> wow, that sucks for the baby
  317. [23:39] <@MattBo> This man is warned of the “finger of God,” and New Testament descriptions of “hearts” being
  318. [23:39] <touchpack> this is borderline conferring
  319. [23:39] <Stephen> but there's a period
  320. [23:39] <@MattBo> hardened
  321. [23:39] <@MattBo> I added the period by accident, I skipped nothing
  322. [23:39] <Stephen> oh ok
  323. [23:39] <@MattBo> “hardened” derive from this Old Testament figure’s narrative. This man presided over Goshen before the father of
  324. [23:40] <@MattBo> Gershom confronted him.
  325. [23:40] <@MattBo> For 10 points, name this ruler
  326. [23:40] <magin> buzz
  327. [23:40] <@MattBo> jonathan
  328. [23:40] <magin> is this just pharaoh?
  329. [23:40] <@MattBo> 10
  330. [23:40] <Stephen> nice
  331. 01[23:40] <vcuEvan> good job
  332. [23:40] <touchpack> cool
  333. [23:40] <@MattBo> 7. Chief Little Crow led his people in this war, though he warned them, “You will die like rabbits when the hungry
  334. [23:40] <ThisIsMyUsername> that's a cool idea
  335. [23:40] <@MattBo> wolves eat them in the Hard Moon.” For 10 points each:
  336. [23:40] <@MattBo> [10] Name this 1862 war that ended with the largest mass-execution in American history when 38 American Indians
  337. [23:40] <@MattBo> were hanged in Mankato.
  338. [23:41] <magin> all right, where are we
  339. [23:41] <Stephen> something in the southwest?
  340. [23:41] <touchpack> maybe like black hawk's war?
  341. [23:41] <Stephen> nah
  342. [23:41] <magin> no, it's not that
  343. [23:41] <@MattBo> answer?
  344. 01[23:41] <vcuEvan> red river war maybe?
  345. [23:41] <Stephen> apache war?
  346. [23:41] <Stephen> oh go with that
  347. 01[23:41] <vcuEvan> answer: apache war
  348. [23:41] <magin> evan, say that
  349. [23:41] <@MattBo> it's the Dakota war
  350. [23:41] <Stephen> i meant the other one...but whatever
  351. [23:42] <@MattBo> [10] John Chivington and the “Bloodless Third” paraded around with the genitalia of dead Cheyenne Indians after
  352. [23:42] <@MattBo> committing this 1864 massacre of Black Kettle’s band in Colorado.
  353. [23:42] <touchpack> this is the sand creek probably
  354. [23:42] <Stephen> yeah
  355. [23:42] <touchpack> it's definitely sand creek
  356. 01[23:42] <vcuEvan> i agree
  357. [23:42] <magin> yes
  358. [23:42] <magin> answer: sand creek
  359. [23:42] <@MattBo> yep
  360. [23:43] <@MattBo> [10] The First Sioux War began after this 1854 “massacre” of 29 soldiers by the Brule Lakotas in retaliation for the
  361. [23:43] <@MattBo> death of Chief Conquering Bear in a dispute over a dead cow.
  362. [23:43] <magin> not the fetterman massacre, I don't think
  363. [23:43] <magin> what are some other massacres
  364. 01[23:43] <vcuEvan> i have nothing else
  365. [23:43] <touchpack> i got nothing
  366. 01[23:43] <vcuEvan> this is white people dying
  367. [23:43] <Stephen> same
  368. [23:43] <@MattBo> answer?
  369. [23:43] <magin> sigh
  370. [23:43] <magin> answer: fetterman massacre
  371. [23:43] <@MattBo> it's the Grattan Massaccre
  372. [23:43] <@MattBo> 10
  373. [23:43] <dendroicavirens> !
  374. 03[23:43] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 90 Seth: 125'
  375. [23:43] <magin> this is much harder than that john guare bonus
  376. [23:44] <@MattBo> eh
  377. [23:44] <@MattBo> you should know the Dakota war
  378. [23:44] <@MattBo> TU
  379. [23:44] <@MattBo> 8. This city invented, and still produces, a unique cinnamon, clove, and nutmeg-spiced liqueur called tentura,
  380. [23:44] <@MattBo> and its outskirts contain a winery founded by Bavarian migrant Gustav Clauss, which produces fortified
  381. [23:44] <@MattBo> (also I'm never clear on how hard to make non-canonical contemporary lit)
  382. [23:44] <@MattBo> madovrafni wine. This city’s central square is named after King George I of its country. In 2004, this city’s
  383. [23:44] <@MattBo> suburb of Rio was linked to Antirrio by a white cable-stay bridge, the world’s longest. This city’s St. Andrews
  384. [23:45] <@MattBo> claims to house the bones of (*) St. Andrew himself
  385. [23:45] <@MattBo> who was martyred here
  386. [23:45] <@MattBo> This former textile-production center
  387. [23:45] <@MattBo> is the largest city and capital of the Achaia region.
  388. [23:45] <@MattBo> For 10 points, name this Peloponnesian city
  389. [23:46] <@MattBo> whose population follows Thessaloniki as the third-largest in Greece
  390. [23:46] <dendroicavirens> buzz
  391. [23:46] <@MattBo> jeff
  392. [23:46] <dendroicavirens> Corinth?
  393. [23:46] <@MattBo> -5
  394. [23:46] <magin> whew
  395. [23:46] <@MattBo> whose namesake gulf to its west contains buried shipwrecks from the Battle of Lepanto.
  396. [23:46] <@MattBo> 4
  397. [23:46] <@MattBo> 3
  398. [23:46] <@MattBo> 2
  399. [23:46] <Stephen> buzz
  400. [23:47] <@MattBo> stephen
  401. [23:47] <Stephen> macaria
  402. [23:47] <@MattBo> no
  403. [23:47] <@MattBo> patras
  404. [23:47] <dendroicavirens> wow
  405. [23:47] <magin> good guess, though
  406. [23:47] <Stephen> oh thats right
  407. [23:47] <@MattBo> TU
  408. 01[23:47] <vcuEvan> damn, had no idea that place existed
  409. [23:47] <@MattBo> 9. One man of this surname worked with Henry Salt and Giambattista Belzoni to move a statue dubbed the
  410. [23:47] <@MattBo> “Young Memnon” from the Ramesseum in Egypt to his adoptive country Britain, and traipsed about the
  411. [23:47] <@MattBo> Middle East using the pseudonym “Sheik Ibrahim.” A later scholar of this surname sent letters agreeing with
  412. [23:47] <@MattBo> the thesis of The Birth of Tragedy to Friedrich Nietzsche. That thinker of this name included a penultimate
  413. [23:47] <@MattBo> section on “Society and Festivals” in a two-work magnum opus that described the dissolution of the “ban on
  414. [23:47] <@MattBo> personality” with increased “municipal freedom” in its section “The Development of the
  415. [23:47] <dendroicavirens> buzz
  416. [23:48] <@MattBo> Jeff
  417. [23:48] <dendroicavirens> Burckhardt
  418. [23:48] <@MattBo> 15
  419. [23:48] <ThisIsMyUsername> nice
  420. 01[23:48] <vcuEvan> nice buzz
  421. [23:48] <@MattBo> 8. Werner Herzog's explored the life and music of this composer in his film Death for Five Voices, and Stravinsky
  422. [23:48] <@MattBo> orchestrated several of his works in a ballet honoring his 400th birthday. For 10 points each:
  423. [23:48] <@MattBo> [10] Name this Renaissance composer known for writing intensely dissonant and chromatic pieces like “Moro,
  424. [23:48] <@MattBo> lasso,” the opening of which Charles Burney considered “extremely shocking and disgusting.”
  425. [23:48] <ThisIsMyUsername> oh, i'ts going to be that murdering asshole
  426. [23:48] <ThisIsMyUsername> umm...
  427. [23:48] <ThisIsMyUsername> gesualdo
  428. [23:48] <ThisIsMyUsername> sound okay?
  429. [23:48] <@MattBo> answer?
  430. [23:48] <selene> great
  431. [23:48] <setht> sure
  432. [23:48] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: gesualdo
  433. [23:48] <dendroicavirens> whatever you say
  434. [23:48] <@MattBo> yes
  435. [23:48] <@MattBo> [10] Most of Gesualdo's best-known pieces, including “Moro, lasso,” are in this form. Prominent composers of
  436. [23:49] <@MattBo> these through-composed polyphonic settings of Italian vernacular poetry included Jacques Arcadelt and Claudio Monteverdi
  437. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> I think these are madrigals
  438. [23:49] <@MattBo> you think!
  439. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> okay with you guys?
  440. [23:49] <selene> yes
  441. [23:49] <setht> yep
  442. [23:49] <dendroicavirens> yes
  443. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: madrigals
  444. [23:49] <@MattBo> [10] This madrigal by Monteverdi was attacked by Giovanni Artusi for its use of dissonance. The text, which comes
  445. [23:49] <@MattBo> from Giovanni Battista Guarini's Il pastor fido, complains that the title shepherdess is “fiercer and more elusive”
  446. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> oh, shit
  447. [23:49] <@MattBo> than the asp
  448. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> they taught me this twice!
  449. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> I've had to analyze this!
  450. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> fuck...
  451. [23:49] <@MattBo> answer?
  452. [23:49] <ThisIsMyUsername> not coming, sorry...
  453. [23:50] <@MattBo> Cruda Amarilli
  454. [23:50] <@MattBo> 20
  455. [23:50] <ThisIsMyUsername> yes
  456. [23:50] <ThisIsMyUsername> fuck
  457. 03[23:50] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 90 Seth: 150'
  458. [23:50] <@MattBo> TU
  459. [23:50] <@MattBo> 10.  In a lyrical interlude in this film, a couple dances in the dark to a record of a piano and cello, which
  460. [23:50] <@MattBo> abruptly cuts to the loud rock music of a scene in a dance club. At the end of this film, the credits run
  461. [23:50] <dendroicavirens> (155)
  462. [23:50] <@MattBo> 155?
  463. [23:50] <touchpack> 150 with the neg?
  464. [23:50] <magin> there was a neg
  465. [23:50] <selene> and a power
  466. [23:50] <Stephen> jeff powered
  467. [23:50] <Stephen> that last one
  468. [23:50] <@MattBo> hmm
  469. [23:50] <Stephen> john powered earlier
  470. [23:50] <touchpack> yeah the score should be odd
  471. [23:51] <Stephen> it was 125 before
  472. [23:51] <Stephen> so 155 sounds right
  473. [23:51] <@MattBo> ok, then it should be 155
  474. [23:51] <@MattBo> right
  475. [23:51] <touchpack> yeah 155
  476. 03[23:51] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 90 Seth: 155'
  477. [23:51] <@MattBo> silently over the final image of an empty staircase. In this film, a gathering breaks up after a man suddenly
  478. [23:51] <@MattBo> murmurs, “I think we’re making fools of ourselves,” after incessantly singing improvised blues songs. In a
  479. [23:52] <@MattBo> later scene, that man observes that “nobody has the time to be vulnerable to each other” and parodies his
  480. [23:52] <@MattBo> playboy persona by mimicking a robot after resuscitating his married lover from a sleeping pill overdose.
  481. [23:52] <@MattBo> This film was shot over a period of six months in the (*) director’s house with a group of his friends working as
  482. [23:52] <@MattBo> the unpaid crew. In this film, the aging businessman Dickie asks his wife for a divorce before spending a night with
  483. [23:52] <@MattBo> the prostitute Jeannie, who was played by the director’s wife, Gena Rowlands. For 10 points, name this landmark
  484. [23:52] <@MattBo> 1968 film directed, like Shadows
  485. [23:52] <@MattBo> and A Woman Under the Influence
  486. [23:52] <@MattBo> by John Cassavetes.
  487. [23:53] <@MattBo> 3
  488. [23:53] <@MattBo> 2
  489. [23:53] <@MattBo> 1
  490. [23:53] <@MattBo> time
  491. [23:53] <@MattBo> this is Facces
  492. [23:53] <@MattBo> *Faces.
  493. 01[23:53] <vcuEvan> yikes
  494. [23:53] <@MattBo> TU
  495. [23:53] <magin> a woman under the influence not hardcore enough for CO, eh?
  496. [23:53] <@MattBo> 11. One protein central to this experiment is a ferrichrome transporter coded for by the fhuA gene. One
  497. [23:53] <@MattBo> that was another Casalaspi special
  498. [23:53] <@MattBo> hypothesis being tested by this experiment proposed a Fano Factor of unity with low variance and the
  499. [23:53] <magin> I see
  500. [23:53] <@MattBo> results following a Poisson distribution. The FALCOR calculator was developed to analyze the results of this
  501. [23:54] <@MattBo> (at least Will Nediger got it in the other room)
  502. [23:54] <@MattBo> experment, while Haldane’s method assumes synchronous cell growth. The Ma-Sandri-Sarkar maximum
  503. [23:54] <@MattBo> likelihood estimator is the most accurate way to interpret its results, and is superior to a method using Yule
  504. [23:54] <@MattBo> processes named for Lea and (*) Coulson. Cairns’ modification of this experiment used lactase-deficient E coli,
  505. [23:54] <@MattBo> and this experiment built upon one investigating antibiotic resistance to penicillin performed by Lederberg. This
  506. [23:54] <@MattBo> experiment disproved the “acquired immunity” hypothesis,
  507. [23:54] <@MattBo>  which claimed that mutations would only exist in
  508. [23:54] <touchpack> buzz
  509. [23:54] <@MattBo> Billy
  510. [23:54] <touchpack> luria-delbruck?
  511. [23:54] <@MattBo> 10
  512. [23:54] <magin> good work
  513. [23:54] <Stephen> well done
  514. 01[23:54] <vcuEvan> good stuff
  515. [23:54] <@MattBo> 10. Answer the following questions about pericyclic reactions. FTPE:
  516. [23:55] <touchpack> oh yay
  517. [23:55] <@MattBo> [10] The Diels-Alder reaction is a 4+2 [read: four plus two] type of this type of pericyclic reaction, which involves
  518. [23:55] <magin> I think this is all billy
  519. [23:55] <Stephen> haha all yours
  520. 01[23:55] <vcuEvan> yeah, just answer them
  521. [23:55] <@MattBo> the reaction of two components to generate a ring.
  522. [23:55] <touchpack> answer: cycloaddition
  523. [23:55] <@MattBo> [10] This reaction is often described as a 2+2+1 [read: two plus two plus one] cycloaddition between an alkyne,
  524. [23:55] <@MattBo> alkene, and carbon monoxide to generate a cyclopentenone, and is generally catalyzed by cobalt or molybdenum
  525. [23:55] <@MattBo> carbonyl compounds.
  526. [23:55] <@MattBo> anybody?
  527. [23:55] <touchpack> well
  528. [23:55] <@MattBo> answer please
  529. [23:56] <touchpack> alder ene
  530. [23:56] <@MattBo> this is the Pauson-Khand reaction
  531. [23:56] <@MattBo> [10] This gas is generally used to protect conjugated 1,3-dienes in a cheletropic pericyclic reaction. The kinetics of
  532. [23:56] <@MattBo> this cheletropic reaction was studied by Suarez and Sordo in 1995, and the rate law was found to be second order in
  533. [23:56] <@MattBo> the gas but first order in the diene.
  534. [23:56] <@MattBo> answer, billy?
  535. [23:56] <touchpack> NO2
  536. [23:56] <touchpack> idk
  537. [23:56] <@MattBo> SO2
  538. [23:56] <@MattBo> 10
  539. [23:56] <selene> oof!
  540. 03[23:56] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 110 Seth: 155'
  541. 01[23:57] <vcuEvan> good effort
  542. [23:57] <touchpack> that's brutally hard
  543. [23:57] <@MattBo> TU
  544. 01[23:57] <vcuEvan> classic sriram
  545. [23:57] <@MattBo> 12. A league pushing for this legislation brought about the resignation of Spencer Walpole by rioting in Hyde Park.
  546. [23:57] <@MattBo> Park.  This bill was opposed by a group named for the Biblical location where David gathered “everybody gathered that was discontented,"
  547. [23:57] <Stephen> lol classic
  548. [23:57] <@MattBo> the Adullamites
  549. [23:57] <@MattBo> Thomas Hodgkinson added an amendment to this bill
  550. [23:57] <@MattBo> that eliminated compound ratepaying.
  551. [23:58] <@MattBo> A speech in favor of this legislation by John Bright may have originated the term "Beating a dead horse."
  552. [23:58] <@MattBo> John Stuart Mill unsuccessfully tried to amend this bill
  553. [23:58] <@MattBo> to benefit women.k
  554. [23:58] <@MattBo> This bill was passed under Lord Derby’s Conservative government, and was actually more radical than a previous
  555. 01[23:58] <vcuEvan> buzz
  556. [23:58] <dendroicavirens> buzz
  557. [23:58] <ThisIsMyUsername> buzz
  558. [23:58] <@MattBo> evan
  559. 01[23:58] <vcuEvan> third reform bill?
  560. [23:58] <@MattBo> -5
  561. [23:58] <@MattBo> Liberal attempt due to the connivance of its drafter, Benjamin Disraeli.  For 10 points, name this 1867 act that
  562. [23:58] <@MattBo> doubled the electorate of England and Wales, passed after a similar act in 1832.
  563. [23:58] <dendroicavirens> buzz
  564. [23:58] <@MattBo> Jeff
  565. [23:59] <dendroicavirens> Second Reform Bill
  566. [23:59] <@MattBo> 10
  567. 01[23:59] <vcuEvan> shit sorry, i thought the great reform bill was the second one for some reason
  568. 03[23:59] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 105 Seth: 165'
  569. [23:59] <Stephen> oh well
  570. [23:59] <@MattBo> 11. This poem conjures up images of “balls and masks begun at midnight, burning ever to mid-day,” but brings up
  571. [23:59] <magin> it happens, no worries
  572. [23:59] <@MattBo> the warning that “dust and ashes, dead and done with, Venice spent what Venice earned.” For 10 points each:
  573. [23:59] <@MattBo> [10] Name this poem whose speaker feels “chilly and grown old” after “lesser thirds” and “sixths diminished” bring
  574. [23:59] <@MattBo> up thoughts of 18th-century Venice.
  575. [23:59] <magin> aw
  576. [23:59] <ThisIsMyUsername> a toccata of galuppi's
  577. [23:59] <setht> tocat
  578. [23:59] <setht> yeah
  579. [23:59] <selene> ok
  580. [23:59] <@MattBo> answer?
  581. [23:59] <dendroicavirens> say it
  582. [23:59] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: a toccata of galuppi's
  583. Session Time: Thu Jul 25 00:00:00 2013
  584. [00:00] <@MattBo> is written by
  585. 01[00:00] <vcuEvan> damn and now we don't get this bonus
  586. [00:00] <setht> r browning
  587. [00:00] <ThisIsMyUsername> r. browning
  588. [00:00] <@MattBo> [10] This Browning poem, also set in Italy, laments the sensation of “Infinite passion, and the pain of finite hearts
  589. [00:00] <@MattBo> that yearn.” The speaker of this poem wishes he could “see with” his lover’s eyes and “drink [his] fill at [her] soul’s
  590. [00:00] <@MattBo> springs," but cannot.
  591. [00:00] <ThisIsMyUsername> is this the thing with campagna in the title?
  592. [00:00] <ThisIsMyUsername> like "love in campagna"
  593. [00:00] <setht> maybe
  594. [00:00] <setht> not sure what this is
  595. [00:00] <dendroicavirens> I have no idea what this is
  596. [00:00] <ThisIsMyUsername> or something like that?
  597. [00:00] <@MattBo> answer?
  598. [00:00] <setht> go for it
  599. [00:00] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: love in campagna
  600. [00:00] <@MattBo> two in the campagna
  601. [00:01] <magin> two in the campagna, I believe
  602. 01[00:01] <vcuEvan> two in the campagna
  603. [00:01] <@MattBo> 20
  604. [00:01] <ThisIsMyUsername> darn
  605. [00:01] <setht> good try
  606. 03[00:01] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 105 Seth: 185'
  607. [00:01] <@MattBo> TU
  608. [00:01] <@MattBo> 13. Before leaving this city, a man asks “My soul - does it linger on your sleeve?” to a woman whom he’d
  609. [00:01] <@MattBo> taken to the nearby Isle of Orange Trees. An aristocratic widower in this city writes with jealousy about the
  610. [00:01] <@MattBo> mallards in his garden pond. In this city, a bell tolls after an old woman called Benn tells a noble visitor of
  611. [00:01] <@MattBo> his  illegitimate parentage. A pun on this  place’s name with an original-language word meaning “dreary”
  612. [00:01] <@MattBo> or “gloomy” is often exploited in literature about it. A girl who attempted suicide in this city’s namesake
  613. 03[00:01] * mbjackson (~chatzilla@cloak-284E3E70.home.otenet.gr) has joined #COFinals
  614. [00:01] <@MattBo> river is later exorcised at a distant monastery after two months of a mostly-silent trance. A nobleman’s boat
  615. [00:01] <@MattBo> arrives in this city in a section of a larger work called (*) “Tasseled Knots.” This city is the home of the Eighth
  616. [00:02] <@MattBo> Prince and his two daughters.
  617. [00:02] <@MattBo>  Two frequent visitors to this place are prince Niou and his friend Kaoru, who engage
  618. [00:02] <@MattBo> in a love triangle with its resident Ukifune that is never resolved.
  619. [00:02] <@MattBo> For 10 points, name this city
  620. [00:02] <@MattBo> the setting of ten namesake chapters
  621. 01[00:02] <vcuEvan> buzz
  622. [00:02] <@MattBo> Evan
  623. 01[00:02] <vcuEvan> asu?
  624. [00:02] <@MattBo> Evan?
  625. [00:02] <@MattBo> -5
  626. [00:03] <@MattBo>  that follow after the blank page titled “Vanished Into the Clouds” indicates  Prince Genji’s death.
  627. [00:03] <@MattBo> 3
  628. [00:03] <@MattBo> 2
  629. [00:03] <@MattBo> 1
  630. [00:03] <@MattBo> time
  631. [00:03] <@MattBo> this is Uji
  632. [00:03] <Stephen> oh thats right
  633. [00:03] <magin> hey, you had a bead on it
  634. [00:03] <@MattBo> TU
  635. [00:03] <@MattBo> 14. This man used the phrase “calm extensive benevolence” to describe the highest good of an individual.
  636. [00:03] <Stephen> that's a great tossup
  637. 03[00:03] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 100 Seth: 185'
  638. [00:03] <@MattBo> A 1976 book on this man’s philosophy by Peter Kivy uses the example of Mr. A seeing X and Mr. B seeing
  639. [00:04] <@MattBo> Y to comment on his theory that “uniformity amidst variety” is aesthetically pleasing. This successor of
  640. [00:04] <@MattBo> Gershom Carmichael in a professorial chair launched the use of the term “approbation” to describe the
  641. [00:04] <@MattBo> feeling produced in a subject that apprehends moral goodness. This author’s Reflections Upon Laughter tried
  642. [00:04] <@MattBo> to refute the self-interest theories of
  643. [00:04] <@MattBo> Jean (*) Mandeville
  644. [00:04] <@MattBo> and his Inquiry into the Original of Our Ideas of Beauty
  645. [00:04] <@MattBo> and Virtue pre-empted Bentham by coining the phrase “greatest happiness for the greatest numbers.”
  646. [00:05] <@MattBo> For 10 points, name this man who argued for an “aesthetic sense” in his Inquiry Concerning Beauty, Order, Harmony, Design, a
  647. [00:05] <magin> buzz
  648. [00:05] <@MattBo> moral sense theorist of the Scottish Enlightenment
  649. [00:05] <@MattBo> Magin
  650. [00:05] <magin> is this hutcheson?
  651. [00:05] <@MattBo> 10
  652. [00:05] <Stephen> nice
  653. [00:05] <magin> whew, I was worried I messed up the name
  654. [00:05] <@MattBo> 12. Answer these questions about the freed black slave Jean-Baptiste Belley, for 10 points each.
  655. [00:05] <@MattBo> [10] Belley represented this French colony in the National Convention during the 1794 debate over abolishing
  656. [00:05] <@MattBo> slavery. The Bois Caiman incident rocked this sugar- and coffee-producing colony also home to Henri Christophe.
  657. [00:05] <magin> haiti
  658. [00:05] <Stephen> haiti
  659. 01[00:05] <vcuEvan> haiti
  660. [00:05] <magin> answer: haiti
  661. [00:05] <@MattBo> yes
  662. [00:06] <@MattBo> [10] Belley lost his Convention seat as this mulatto leader was gathering troops in Haiti’s south in 1797. This man
  663. [00:06] <@MattBo> and his younger partner Alexandre Petion then lost the War of the Knives to Toussaint L’Ouverture.
  664. 01[00:06] <vcuEvan> hmmm no idea
  665. [00:06] <magin> I knew this once
  666. [00:06] <magin> not dutty boukman?
  667. [00:06] <Stephen> if only this was on the war of the knives
  668. [00:06] <@MattBo> answer?
  669. [00:06] <magin> or the other one
  670. 01[00:06] <vcuEvan> answer: pierre
  671. [00:06] <@MattBo> Andre Rigaud
  672. [00:06] <@MattBo> [10] This huge world history book has Girodet’s painting of Jean-Baptiste Belley on its cover. Its author, C. A.
  673. [00:06] <@MattBo> Bayly, argues that the world was deeply globalized as early as 1780, using the Haitian Revolution’s ripple effects
  674. [00:07] <Stephen> oh that's who belley is
  675. [00:07] <@MattBo> across Europe and the Americas as one example.
  676. [00:07] <@MattBo> haha
  677. [00:07] <dendroicavirens> !
  678. [00:07] <@MattBo> I wonder if Jeff knows this
  679. [00:07] <magin> well, I don't know
  680. 01[00:07] <vcuEvan> i got nothing
  681. [00:07] <dendroicavirens> (I'll give it a shot...)
  682. [00:07] <Stephen> go for it jeff
  683. [00:07] <@MattBo> alright, what's Jeff got
  684. [00:08] <dendroicavirens> is this Imperial Meridian?
  685. [00:08] <@MattBo> The Birth of the Modern World
  686. [00:08] <dendroicavirens> oh, that thing
  687. [00:08] <@MattBo> TU
  688. [00:08] <dendroicavirens> wow
  689. [00:08] <@MattBo> This phrase inspires the command “Skippy, valium, level 3,” which is given to an off-camera worker. One
  690. [00:08] <@MattBo> target of this phrase works on the side as a wedding and funeral singer, and is twice referred to after putting
  691. 03[00:08] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 130 Seth: 185'
  692. [00:08] <@MattBo> a finger to her lips as a “killer librarian.” Dialogue about a “gag item” precedes the first use of this phrase,
  693. [00:08] <Stephen> 120
  694. [00:08] <@MattBo> didn't you 10 the tossup
  695. [00:08] <@MattBo> oh right, you 10'd the bonus
  696. [00:08] <Stephen> we had 100 before
  697. 03[00:08] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 120 Seth: 185'
  698. [00:09] <@MattBo> whose main user said his thumb was in the way during a Playgirl photo shoot. It follows the phrase “rowing
  699. [00:09] <@MattBo> the Atlantic” and talk about the “last perfect pitched game” of the Chicago Cubs. David and a gap-toothed
  700. [00:09] <@MattBo> black woman named Valerie first hear this phrase
  701. [00:09] <@MattBo> from Penn and Teller.
  702. [00:09] <@MattBo>  Later in the episode in which this phrase appears,
  703. [00:09] <@MattBo> phrase appears, it inspires the line “Stone cold, girl…stone cold” from Whoopi Goldberg.
  704. [00:10] <@MattBo> An agreement with the phrase "smoke and fog" ends the use of this phrase
  705. [00:10] <@MattBo> resulting in Tom Bergeron jumping for joy
  706. [00:10] <@MattBo> at 1000-dollar,
  707. [00:10] <@MattBo> 5-square win.
  708. [00:10] <@MattBo>  For 10 points, name this two-word phrase exclaimed ten times by Gilbert Gottfried
  709. [00:10] <@MattBo> to incompetent Hollywood Squares contestants.
  710. 01[00:11] <vcuEvan> buzz
  711. [00:11] <@MattBo> evan
  712. 01[00:11] <vcuEvan> you idiot
  713. 01[00:11] <vcuEvan> s
  714. [00:11] <@MattBo> no
  715. [00:11] <setht> please yell this at us
  716. [00:11] <@MattBo> 5
  717. [00:11] <@MattBo> 4
  718. 01[00:11] <vcuEvan> this is an ambitious tossup
  719. [00:11] <@MattBo> 3
  720. [00:11] <touchpack> 10 times
  721. [00:11] <@MattBo> 2
  722. [00:11] <@MattBo> 1
  723. [00:11] <@MattBo> time
  724. [00:11] <@MattBo> this is "YOU FOOL!"
  725. [00:11] <Stephen> so close evan
  726. [00:11] <touchpack> wow
  727. [00:11] <@MattBo> TU
  728. [00:11] <@MattBo> 16. Paul Johnson suggested that some participants in this program were actually hiding out in Cuba. A
  729. [00:12] <@MattBo> burned-out Ford Fairlane used by participants in this program was found near the edge of
  730. [00:12] <@MattBo> of the Bogue Chitto Swamp,
  731. [00:12] <@MattBo> where the FBI discovered eight corpses.
  732. [00:12] <@MattBo> This program was the brainchild of Bob Parris Moses.
  733. [00:12] <@MattBo> This program resulted in the creation of the MFDP, whose vice-chair was Fannie Lou Hamer, and which tried to
  734. [00:12] <magin> buzz
  735. [00:12] <@MattBo> Magin
  736. [00:12] <magin> the freedom riders?
  737. [00:13] <@MattBo> -5
  738. [00:13] <@MattBo> bring a rival delegation to the DNC
  739. [00:13] <magin> oh, I fucked up the package
  740. [00:13] <@MattBo> bring a rival delegation to the DNC. In 2005, Edgar Ray (*) Killen was convicted of manslaughter for his actions
  741. [00:13] <@MattBo> against this program. James Chaney, Michael Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman were working on this campaign
  742. [00:13] <@MattBo> when they were murdered by the White Knights. For 10 points, name this 1964 campaign organized by SNCC and
  743. [00:13] <@MattBo> CORE to register black voters in Mississippi.
  744. [00:13] <dendroicavirens> buzz
  745. [00:13] <@MattBo> Jeff
  746. [00:13] <dendroicavirens> freedom summer?
  747. [00:13] <@MattBo> 10
  748. 01[00:13] <vcuEvan> so close
  749. 03[00:13] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 115 Seth: 195'
  750. [00:14] <@MattBo> It was developed by Feynman. For 10 points each:
  751. [00:14] <@MattBo> [10] Name this formulation of quantum mechanics that generalizes the action principle of classical mechanics.
  752. [00:14] <setht> path integral formulation, I think
  753. [00:14] <selene> sounds great
  754. [00:14] <ThisIsMyUsername> go for it
  755. [00:14] <setht> answer: path integral formulation
  756. [00:14] <@MattBo> yes
  757. [00:14] <@MattBo> [10] One of the more interesting twists on the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics is the fractional
  758. [00:14] <@MattBo> quantum mechanics of Laskin. In this modification, the Brownian paths are replaced with these paths in which there
  759. [00:15] <@MattBo> are fewer long jumps as opposed to short jumps, leading to long tails.
  760. [00:15] <setht> I'm not sure what this is
  761. [00:15] <@MattBo> answer?
  762. [00:15] <setht> answer: mean field
  763. [00:15] <@MattBo> levy flights
  764. [00:15] <@MattBo> [10] One of the more useful things about the path integral formulation is its ability to derive insight into this
  765. [00:15] <@MattBo> quantity, which is a path integral over periodic orbits of period of 1 divided temperature. The Helmholtz Free
  766. [00:15] <@MattBo> Energy is proportional to the logarithm of this quantity.
  767. [00:16] <setht> partition function, I think
  768. [00:16] <@MattBo> answer?
  769. [00:16] <selene> sure
  770. [00:16] <setht> answer partition function
  771. [00:16] <@MattBo> 20
  772. 03[00:16] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 115 Seth: 215'
  773. [00:16] <@MattBo> TU
  774. [00:16] <@MattBo> 17. This author drew on the Amphitryon myth for a novel narrated by Hermes, who has to get Adam Godley
  775. [00:16] <@MattBo> out of bed so that Zeus can sleep with Godley’s wife Helen. This author of The Infinities rose to fame on the
  776. [00:16] <@MattBo> strength of a tetralogy of scientifically-themed novels, including Doctor Copernicus and Newton’s Letter.
  777. [00:16] <@MattBo> In one novel by this author, the amoral mathematician Freddy Montgomery comes to regret murdering a
  778. [00:16] <Stephen> buzz
  779. [00:16] <@MattBo> Stephen
  780. [00:17] <Stephen> banville
  781. [00:17] <@MattBo> uh
  782. [00:17] <@MattBo> that's 15 dude
  783. [00:17] <magin> nice buzz
  784. [00:17] <touchpack> nice
  785. [00:17] <ThisIsMyUsername> nice
  786. 01[00:17] <vcuEvan> damn i read that book
  787. 01[00:17] <vcuEvan> athena
  788. [00:17] <Stephen> lol they have all those scientist novels at the bookstore i go to
  789. [00:17] <magin> ha
  790. [00:17] <@MattBo> 14. The character of Boris Lermontov from Powell and Pressburger's The Red Shoes was based on this man, and he
  791. 01[00:17] <vcuEvan> err it's a trilogy i think
  792. [00:17] <@MattBo> commissioned La Boutique fantasque from Ottorini Respighi and Léonide Massine. For 10 points each:
  793. [00:17] <@MattBo> [10] Name this ballet impresario who employed Anna Pavlova, Mikhail Fokine, and Vaslav Nijinsky in his
  794. [00:17] <magin> probably balanchine
  795. [00:17] <magin> or maybe not
  796. [00:17] <Stephen> ok
  797. [00:17] <@MattBo> company, the Ballets Russes.
  798. [00:17] <magin> no
  799. 01[00:17] <vcuEvan> i have nothing here, pick one
  800. [00:17] <magin> diaghilev
  801. [00:17] <magin> right
  802. [00:17] <Stephen> diaghilev
  803. [00:17] <magin> answer: diaghilev
  804. [00:18] <@MattBo> [10] In 1917 Diaghilev put on this ballet, a collaboration between Erik Satie, Jean Cocteau, and Pablo Picasso. It
  805. [00:18] <magin> facade
  806. [00:18] <@MattBo> features three impresarios futilely attempting to get people to enter their theaters, and its title refers to the side acts
  807. 01[00:18] <vcuEvan> i concur
  808. [00:18] <@MattBo> that end up being the focus of attention.
  809. [00:18] <magin> answer: facade
  810. [00:18] <@MattBo> Parade
  811. [00:18] <ThisIsMyUsername> so close
  812. [00:18] <magin> shit!
  813. 01[00:18] <vcuEvan> oh well
  814. [00:18] <@MattBo> [10] Another Ballets Russes production was Le dieu bleu, with music by this Venezuelan-born composer and lover
  815. [00:18] <Stephen> lol
  816. [00:18] <touchpack> nooo
  817. [00:18] <magin> I knew that, too
  818. [00:18] <@MattBo> of Marcel Proust, best known for songs like “Si mes vers avaient des ailes” and “L'heure exquise.”
  819. [00:18] <magin> but said facade for some reason
  820. [00:18] <magin> hahn
  821. [00:18] <magin> answer: hahn
  822. [00:18] <@MattBo> that Marcel Proust's asshole tossup serves you well
  823. [00:18] <@MattBo> 20
  824. [00:18] <ThisIsMyUsername> yeah, Kevin likes Reynaldo Hahn
  825. [00:18] <magin> should have 30d
  826. 03[00:18] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 150 Seth: 215'
  827. [00:19] <magin> tsk tsk
  828. [00:19] <magin> facade is walton
  829. [00:19] <ThisIsMyUsername> yes, indeed
  830. [00:19] <ThisIsMyUsername> based on stuff by sitwell, I think
  831. [00:19] <Stephen> wasnt i talking to you guys at lunch on saturday about banville never coming up
  832. [00:19] <magin> right
  833. [00:19] <@MattBo> tossup 18
  834. [00:19] <@MattBo> 18. In a solid under the influence of an electric field, the production of this type of current in addition to the
  835. [00:19] <@MattBo> charge current causes the Peltier effect. Perelman introduced one form of this quantity that was both coercive
  836. [00:19] <@MattBo> and critical for Ricci flow.
  837. [00:20] <@MattBo>  A strong magnetic field suppression of thermopower is an indication of a large
  838. [00:20] <@MattBo> contribution to this quantity due to spins. Another form of this quantity is based off power law generating
  839. [00:20] <@MattBo> statistics and uses a parameter q that quantifies how much this quantity departs from
  840. [00:20] <@MattBo>  (*) extensivity.
  841. [00:20] <@MattBo> This quantity is one of the natural variables of both enthalpy and internal energy.
  842. [00:20] <touchpack> buzz
  843. [00:20] <@MattBo> Billy
  844. [00:20] <touchpack> volume
  845. [00:20] <@MattBo> -5
  846. [00:21] <touchpack> that's also a natural variable for both those things
  847. [00:21] <@MattBo> The sum of the product of eigenvalues of the density matrix
  848. [00:21] <@MattBo> with the log of those eigenvalues gives another form of this quantity. For 10
  849. [00:21] <touchpack> or wait no
  850. [00:21] <@MattBo> points, name this quantity whose most basic form is equal to Boltzmann’s constant times the log of the number of
  851. [00:21] <@MattBo> microstates.
  852. [00:21] <setht> buzz
  853. [00:21] <@MattBo> seth
  854. [00:21] <setht> entropy
  855. [00:21] <@MattBo> 10
  856. [00:21] <touchpack> yeah, i screwed that up
  857. [00:22] <@MattBo> 15. It is treated by inserting a catheter into the heart and firing radiofrequency waves at the defective tissue, for 10
  858. [00:22] <Stephen> oh well
  859. [00:22] <magin> it's all right, join the club
  860. [00:22] <@MattBo> points each:
  861. [00:22] <@MattBo> [10] Name this conduction disorder in which an accessory pathway called the Bundle of Kent transmits electrical
  862. [00:22] <@MattBo> impulses faster than usual, leading to pre-excitation of the ventricles and reentrant tachycardia.
  863. [00:22] <selene> Wolff-Parkinson-White??
  864. [00:22] <setht> no clue here
  865. [00:22] <ThisIsMyUsername> if you say so
  866. [00:22] <dendroicavirens> designate Selene
  867. [00:22] <selene> answrer:  wolff-parkinson-white
  868. [00:22] <@MattBo> [10] This is the specific part of the conduction system that gets bypassed in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. It
  869. [00:23] <@MattBo> transmits its impulses to the Bundle of His and is defective in a condition that exhibits Wenckebach periodicity.
  870. [00:23] <selene> uh...
  871. [00:23] <setht> one of them nodes?
  872. [00:23] <@MattBo> answer?
  873. [00:23] <selene> AV node?
  874. [00:23] <selene> er…answer:  av node?
  875. [00:23] <@MattBo> 10
  876. [00:23] <@MattBo> [10] Though most patients have normal recordings, the classic pattern for Wolff-Parkinson-White seen on an
  877. [00:23] <@MattBo> electrocardiogram consists of a shortened PR interval as well as this unique finding,  in which the ascending part of
  878. [00:23] <@MattBo> the QRS complex is slurred.
  879. [00:24] <selene> delta
  880. [00:24] <setht> okay
  881. [00:24] <selene> answer:  delta
  882. [00:24] <@MattBo> 304
  883. [00:24] <@MattBo> *30
  884. [00:24] <touchpack> impressive
  885. [00:24] <setht> I prefer 304
  886. 03[00:24] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 145 Seth: 255'
  887. [00:24] <selene> medicine!
  888. [00:24] <@MattBo> TU
  889. [00:24] <@MattBo> 19. In the best-known account of this being, its environs include hanging severed heads described with the
  890. [00:24] <@MattBo> word “tabo”, a rare ablative form meaning “with decay.”  Potitius observed the downfall of this figure, which
  891. [00:24] <@MattBo> inspired the Pinarian family to set up additional rituals. An early account describes the army of Tarchon
  892. [00:25] <@MattBo> helping to vanquish this figure.
  893. [00:25] <@MattBo> This being lives under a vulture-infested pointy rock made of flint, and was
  894. [00:25] <@MattBo> betrayed by a sister with a feminine version of his name in Etruscan accounts.
  895. [00:25] <@MattBo> His namesake steps led to the Forum Boarium.
  896. [00:25] <@MattBo> Forum Boarium. This half-human uses a tactic first seen in Homer’s Hymn to (*) Hermes when he walks his
  897. [00:25] <@MattBo> victims backwards into a cave whose door is blocked by a boulder.
  898. [00:25] <setht> buzz
  899. [00:25] <Stephen> buzz
  900. [00:25] <@MattBo> seth
  901. [00:25] <setht> cacus
  902. [00:25] <@MattBo> 10
  903. [00:25] <@MattBo> 16. Two airplanes appear in the sky above a bunch of colored disks in a painting this man dedicated to an aviator,
  904. [00:26] <@MattBo> Homage to Bleriot. For 10 points each:
  905. [00:26] <@MattBo> [10] Name this 20th-century French artist of a series depicting the Eiffel Tower, who founded a movement alongside
  906. [00:26] <@MattBo> his wife Sonia Terk.
  907. [00:26] <ThisIsMyUsername> delauney
  908. [00:26] <ThisIsMyUsername> I'm pretty sure
  909. [00:26] <selene> sure
  910. [00:26] <setht> sounds good here
  911. [00:26] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: delauney
  912. [00:26] <@MattBo> yes
  913. [00:26] <@MattBo> [10] Delaunay helped found this school of Cubist art, whose name was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in reference
  914. [00:26] <@MattBo> to a mythological musician.
  915. [00:26] <ThisIsMyUsername> orphism
  916. [00:26] <setht> orph
  917. [00:26] <@MattBo> [10] Another offshoot of Cubism was developed by this Russian woman, whose paintings Aeroplane over Train and
  918. [00:26] <@MattBo> The Cyclist exemplify her style of “Cubo-Futurism.”
  919. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> I didn't say answer!
  920. [00:27] <@MattBo> oh whatever
  921. [00:27] <@MattBo> you knew it
  922. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> this is popova, I think
  923. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> but I'm not sure
  924. [00:27] <setht> I don't know
  925. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> it's one of the -ova's
  926. [00:27] <selene> your choice
  927. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> I'll guess popova
  928. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> answer: popova
  929. [00:27] <@MattBo> Goncharova
  930. [00:27] <Stephen> goncharova
  931. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> fuck
  932. [00:27] <ThisIsMyUsername> the other one
  933. [00:27] <Stephen> apple picking wasnt mentioned
  934. [00:27] <@MattBo> TU
  935. [00:27] <@MattBo> 20. This poem parenthetically calls the universe “a procession, with measured and beautiful motion” before
  936. [00:27] <@MattBo> aggressively asking, “do you know so much yourself, that you call the slave or dull-face ignorant?”
  937. 03[00:28] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 145 Seth: 285'
  938. [00:28] <@MattBo> This poem’s speaker asserts that “to be with those I like is enough” and tells an anecdote about an old farmer
  939. [00:28] <@MattBo> who goes fishing with his five sons and his grandchildren.
  940. [00:29] <@MattBo> In another section of this poem, the speaker cries out that “books, art, religion” are “now consumed” in the midst of “limitless limpid jets of love, hot and
  941. [00:29] <@MattBo> enormous"
  942. [00:29] <magin> buzz
  943. [00:29] <@MattBo> enormous.” The third poem in the (*) “Children of Adam” sequence, it dismisses a “sloven” who “does not know
  944. [00:29] <@MattBo> Magin
  945. [00:29] <magin> hmm
  946. [00:29] <magin> fuck
  947. [00:29] <magin> i sing the body electric?
  948. [00:29] <@MattBo> I'll give you 15 for that
  949. [00:29] <Stephen> wow
  950. 01[00:29] <vcuEvan> woo
  951. [00:29] <Stephen> goodbuzz
  952. [00:29] <touchpack> good closer
  953. [00:29] <magin> thanks
  954. [00:30] <ThisIsMyUsername> I was trying to figure out which Whitman cumming thing that was
  955. [00:30] <magin> yeah, there are a lot of them
  956. [00:30] <@MattBo> 17. In the conclusion to this book, titled “The Conflicts of Modernity,” its author suggests that beneath the general
  957. [00:30] <ThisIsMyUsername> there are too many...
  958. [00:30] <@MattBo> agreement on moral imperatives in modern culture is profound disagreement on their underlying moral sources. For
  959. [00:30] <@MattBo> 10 points each:
  960. [00:30] <@MattBo> [10] Name this philosophical and historical study of the “making of the modern identity,” which argues that modern
  961. [00:30] <@MattBo> philosophy has ignored the relationship between the title concept and ideas of human good.
  962. [00:30] <Stephen> no clue
  963. 01[00:30] <vcuEvan> nope
  964. [00:30] <@MattBo> anything from Jonathan?
  965. [00:31] <magin> I wish
  966. [00:31] <@MattBo> this is Sources of the Self
  967. [00:31] <@MattBo> [10] Sources of the Self was written by this living Canadian philosopher who has advanced a communitarian critique
  968. [00:31] <@MattBo> of liberalism in such works as Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition.
  969. 01[00:31] <vcuEvan> taylor?
  970. [00:31] <magin> why not
  971. 01[00:31] <vcuEvan> answer: taylor
  972. [00:31] <@MattBo> that's correct
  973. [00:31] <@MattBo> [10] In his The Ethics of Authenticity, Taylor names the “three malaises” of modernity as the rise of individualism,
  974. [00:31] <@MattBo> the primacy of instrumental reason, and the danger of the “soft despotism” first coined and theorized in this book by
  975. [00:31] <@MattBo> Alexis de Tocqueville.
  976. [00:31] <magin> democracy in america
  977. 01[00:31] <vcuEvan> i hope so
  978. [00:32] <Stephen> yeah
  979. [00:32] <magin> answer: democracy in america
  980. [00:32] <Stephen> what's taylor's first name?
  981. [00:32] <@MattBo> 20
  982. [00:32] <@MattBo> Charles Taylor
  983. 01[00:32] <vcuEvan> charles?
  984. [00:32] <magin> is there a tiebreaker?
  985. [00:32] <@MattBo> there is
  986. [00:32] <touchpack> what's the final score?
  987. 03[00:32] * MattBo changes topic to 'Magin: 180 Seth: 285'
  988. [00:32] <magin> if we didn't neg so often, alas
  989. 01[00:32] <vcuEvan> good game
  990. [00:32] <magin> gg
  991. [00:32] <touchpack> good game!
  992. 01[00:32] <vcuEvan> indeed
  993. [00:32] <Stephen> yes good game
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